Commencez à lire Rickey and Robinson sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.
Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier [Format Kindle]

Harvey Frommer

Prix conseillé : EUR 7,56 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 13,28
Prix Kindle : EUR 5,29 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 7,99 (60%)

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 5,29  
Broché EUR 13,25  
Chaque jour, un ebook avec au moins 60% de réduction
Découvrez l'Offre Éclair Kindle et inscrivez-vous à la Newsletter Offre Éclair Kindle pour ne rater aucun ebook à prix exceptionnel. Abonnez-vous dès maintenant




Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Blending exclusive interviews with Rachel Robinson, Mack Robinson (Jackie's brother), Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Ralph Kiner and others, celebrated author Harvey Frommer evokes the lives of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Branch Rickey and heralded baseball player Jackie Robinson to describe how they worked together to shatter baseball's color line. Rickey and Robinson is a dual biography tracing the convergence of the lives of two of baseball's most influential individuals in a special moment in sports and cultural history. To this day, their bravery and determination continues to shape the sociological perspectives of the sports world. Now in a new paperback edition!

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1974 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 264 pages
  • Editeur : Taylor Trade Publishing; Édition : Limited 1st ed (1 mai 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00CMOC91A
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  •  Souhaitez-vous faire modifier les images ?


Commentaires en ligne 

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 étoiles sur 5  30 commentaires
5 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 7 juillet 2003
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
From Black Athlete Sports Netwrok
This N' That with Tony Mack:
Book Review: Rickey and Robinson
-"It is not the critic who counts, nor the man who points out where the strong man stumbles, nor where the doer of deeds could have done better. On the contrary, the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena -- whose vision is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives vallantly; who errs and comes up again and again; who knows the greatest devotions; the great enthusiasms; who at best knows in the end of the triumph of high achievement."
-- Theodore Roosevelt
Harvey Frommer lived in Brooklyn that summer in 1947 when two men, one black and one white, came together to right a long overdue wrong in the sport of baseball. Just two years removed from the end of World War II, the climate in America and the world had taken on a major change.
More than 50 years later, Frommer gives us a brief snapshot of the life and times of Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey. Blending exclusive interviews with Rachel Robinson, Mack Robinson (Jackie's brother), Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Ralph Kiner, and others, Frommer evokes the lives of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Branch Rickey and heralded baseball player Jackie Robinson to describe how they worked to shatter baseball's color line.
"Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier" gives a vivid account on the lives of these two men and how their collaboration helped bring change to the game of baseball and to society. "Many Blacks had just returned home from the war, including Jackie", said Frommer. "They had just served their country in a war and were tired of being considered second-class citizens."
In an excerpt from the book, Frommer talks about that day in April when Robinson played his first game in Brooklyn:
"With the blue number 42 on the back of his Brooklyn Dodger home uniform, Jackie Robinson took his place at first base at Ebbets Field on April 15, 1947. It was 32 years to the day since Jack Johnson had become the first black heavyweight champion of the world."
Writer James Baldwin had noted: "Back in the thirties and forties, Joe Louis was the only hero that we ever had. When he won a fight, everybody in Harlem was up in heaven. On that April day the large contingent of blacks in the crowd of nearly 40, 000 had another hero to be "up in heaven" about, another hero to stand beside Joe Louis."
Frommer's book also examines the decisions and oppositions that existed during a time when black athletes underwent the kind of scrutiny that would be embarrassing to this day. In many instances, we can still see them existing in a subtle fashion now, but it showed how Robinson had to be the first to endure such indignities.
"Rickey and Robinson" is a dual biography tracing the convergence of the lives of two of baseball's most influential individuals in a special moment in sports and cultural history.
For anyone that wants to learn and grasp the period that these two men lived, this book does an excellent job of weaving that story.
I highly recommend that you check this book out.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 7 juillet 2003
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
From Black Athlete Sports Netwrok
This N' That with Tony Mack:
Book Review: Rickey and Robinson
-"It is not the critic who counts, nor the man who points out where the strong man stumbles, nor where the doer of deeds could have done better. On the contrary, the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena -- whose vision is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives vallantly; who errs and comes up again and again; who knows the greatest devotions; the great enthusiasms; who at best knows in the end of the triumph of high achievement."
-- Theodore Roosevelt
Harvey Frommer lived in Brooklyn that summer in 1947 when two men, one black and one white, came together to right a long overdue wrong in the sport of baseball. Just two years removed from the end of World War II, the climate in America and the world had taken on a major change.
More than 50 years later, Frommer gives us a brief snapshot of the life and times of Jackie Robinson and Branch Rickey. Blending exclusive interviews with Rachel Robinson, Mack Robinson (Jackie's brother), Hall of Famers Monte Irvin, Duke Snider, Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella, Ralph Kiner, and others, Frommer evokes the lives of Brooklyn Dodgers manager Branch Rickey and heralded baseball player Jackie Robinson to describe how they worked to shatter baseball's color line.
"Rickey and Robinson: The Men Who Broke Baseball's Color Barrier" gives a vivid account on the lives of these two men and how their collaboration helped bring change to the game of baseball and to society. "Many Blacks had just returned home from the war, including Jackie", said Frommer. "They had just served their country in a war and were tired of being considered second-class citizens."
In an excerpt from the book, Frommer talks about that day in April when Robinson played his first game in Brooklyn:
"With the blue number 42 on the back of his Brooklyn Dodger home uniform, Jackie Robinson took his place at first base at Ebbets Field on April 15, 1947. It was 32 years to the day since Jack Johnson had become the first black heavyweight champion of the world."
Writer James Baldwin had noted: "Back in the thirties and forties, Joe Louis was the only hero that we ever had. When he won a fight, everybody in Harlem was up in heaven. On that April day the large contingent of blacks in the crowd of nearly 40, 000 had another hero to be "up in heaven" about, another hero to stand beside Joe Louis."
Frommer's book also examines the decisions and oppositions that existed during a time when black athletes underwent the kind of scrutiny that would be embarrassing to this day. In many instances, we can still see them existing in a subtle fashion now, but it showed how Robinson had to be the first to endure such indignities.
"Rickey and Robinson" is a dual biography tracing the convergence of the lives of two of baseball's most influential individuals in a special moment in sports and cultural history.
For anyone that wants to learn and grasp the period that these two men lived, this book does an excellent job of weaving that story.
I highly recommend that you check this book out.
3 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 *****REWARDING AND READABLE BOOK*********************** 8 juillet 2003
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
******************************************************** ...
Professional athletes are probably no more ignorant of history than the rest of us, but there was something especially disturbing about the number of modern players who, in 1997, during the fiftieth anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking the baseball color line, revealed that they didn't know who he was. Pollsters probably didn't ask, but it's likely even fewer would have known who Branch Rickey was. That black players in particular, whose careers follow the path that these men blazed, do not comprehend and honor the debt is most troubling of all. Anyone wishing to remedy their own lack of knowledge, and even those who think they already know the whole story, will find Harvey Frommer's Rickey and Robinson an invaluable resource and a truly moving read.
Mr. Frommer had the novel idea of structuring the book as parallel biographies of the two men, their stories overlapping and lives knitting together for that remarkable period of years when they, almost by themselves, integrated major league baseball. Jackie Robinson's is the better known tale, from UCLA to the Army to the Negro Leagues to the Dodgers' minor leagues and then to Brooklyn, with a significant career in business and politics afterwards. And most baseball fans will be familiar with Branch Rickey's reputation as an innovator, his most lasting contributions, besides integration, to the game including the batting helmet and the organized minor league farm system. Met fans too will recall Ralph Kiner's stories about how tight-fisted and patronizing (in both the positive and negative senses) Rickey was with his players. But Mr. Frommer gives us a full picture of the man, of his religious background (which seems to have played no small part in his willingness to be a racial pioneer), his keen mind for the game and for business, and his endless maneuvering to improve his teams. Each man led a life full enough to support a biography of his own. Here we get both and they're fascinating.
But the event that defined their lives was the meeting on August 28, 1945, at Brooklyn Dodgers headquarters, between Rickey and Robinson. It's astonishing to realize that this first time the men ever met, Branch Rickey asked Jackie Robinson to take on the daunting task of being the first black man to play organized white baseball (at least since the color bar had been erected decades earlier). But Rickey had made a true project of the whole idea, had scouted the Negro Leagues and the personal backgrounds of the prospective players thoroughly, and he knew Robinson was uniquely well-suited-- by his ability, his intelligence, his education, his relatively middle-class California upbringing, and his temperament, desire, and will--to bear the burdens. And so "The Meeting" was not just a get acquainted session, but an opportunity for Rickey to probe and to prepare Robinson, even to the point of demonstrating the kind of taunts he should expect to hear, before offering him the bittersweet role of, as he put it: "carrying the reputation of a race on your shoulders."
The whole book is enjoyable but it is this chapter that really sings. The Meeting has been the subject of books, film, stageplay, and more, but it's never been told better than here, with high drama and a sense of history, but also with an immediacy that makes the reader feel like he's a fly on the wall in Rickey's office those sixty years ago. No one can understand what happened in baseball and in American society over those sixty years without knowing the story of Rickey and Robinson and, Mr. Frommer having given us such a rewarding and readable book about the men and their noble achievement, there's no excuse for not knowing it.
*****************************************************
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 - CNN.COM: A BOOK THAT HAS LOST NONE OF ITS RELEVANCE 20 juin 2003
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
This year has been very, very good to baseball books. Harvey Frommer: "Rickey and Robinson" (Taylor paperback). This recent re-release of Frommer's 1982 hardcover shows it to have lost none of its relevance. The book tells the story of Jackie Robinson's breaking of baseball's color line, and the important role played by Dodger general manager Branch Rickey in getting Robinson into the majors. -
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Tip of the Iceberg! 4 mars 2014
Par Book Mark - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
If you too recently watched 42 and are looking to learn more about Jackie Robinson or Branch Rickey, this book is a start... It's certainly better written and more interesting than Branch Rickey (Penguin Lives). Author Frommer structures the book as parallel biographies of the two men, their stories overlapping and lives knitting together for that remarkable period of years when they, almost by themselves, integrated major league baseball.

I have concluded however, that my favorite book on this topic is the first memoir by Jackie Robinson: My Own Story. It was hard to find, but worth the search. It was written with the help of Wendell Smith, who was clearly a friend and advocate for Robinson. It's also interesting to think that its words are the closest to Robinson's thoughts and memories as he and Branch Rickey broke the color barrier in baseball.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique