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Rod: The Autobiography (Anglais) Relié – 23 octobre 2012


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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

“Funny, self-deprecating and a whole lot less boastful than he could be, Mr. Stewart offers a string of Grade-A rock ‘n’ roll debauchery stories and…makes them charming.” The New York Times 

“The best news about Stewart’s autobiography is that it revives the rollicking humor and self-deprecating personality of his early career. It takes the jolly perspective of a guy who knows he’s one of the world’s luckiest men, and the result proves infectious.”  –New York Daily News
 
“In an action-packed memoir, Stewart explains how he survived the excesses of Seventies rock stardom…full of bad behavior and enough ex-wives to fill an entire soccer side.” —Rolling Stone

“A he-said romp through a five-decade music career that spawned a string of enduring pop classics…[Stewart is] an entertaining storyteller who admits that at age 67 he still spends time on that bottle-blond, high-maintenance hair. We love him for that.” –The Tampa Bay Times
 
“Unsurprisingly, Rod Stewart has a few stories to tell…The singer tells them in a charming, often humble and self-deprecating, and always entertaining fashion throughout Rod, his autobiography….A moving read.” –The Buffalo News

“…a life that seems to be one endless romp from hit song to hot date, with a few stylish Italian sports cars and expensive pieces of Pre-Raphaelite art thrown in for good measure. Blondes (Have More Fun), indeed.”USA Today

"The most outrageous—and wittiest—rock autobiography of the decade." –The Daily Mail

 “Amiably and self-knowingly told… the tone [is] pitched right and the jokes good." –The Guardian
 
"Forget your Salman Rushdie.  Put down your JK Rowling.  Tomorrow sees the publication of one of the most entertaining, revealing, captivating books of the year-- the autobiography of Rod Stewart.  Truly." The Independent online

“Anyone who wants to be a rock and roll superstar should read this…crazy stories.” –Jimmy Fallon
 
“A likable, mostly generous and well-written look back at the days of bedding starlets and destroying hotels.” –Kirkus

“Looking at the fall release schedule and seeing memoirs slated from Pete Townshend and Neil Young, who would have tipped Rod Stewart as being the rock graybeard most likely to produce the best book? But he did. Rod: The Autobiography (Crown) is a warm, roguish reminiscence. More playful than Townshend's at times ponderous Who I Am and far more insightful than Young's numbing Waging Heavy Peace, Stewart's memoir has much of the joyful, big-hearted raffishness of the singer's classic early '70s recordings. (It's more "Mandolin Wind" than "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?" — or anything else of his from the last 35 years or so.) The book is a fun, rollicking read.” —Spin.com

Présentation de l'éditeur

The extraordinary life and career of music legend Rod Stewart, in his own words for the first time.
 
With his soulful and singular voice, narrative songwriting, and passionate live performances Rod Stewart has paved one of the most iconic and successful music careers of all time. He was the charismatic lead singer for the trailblazing rock and roll bands The Jeff Beck Group and The Faces, and as a solo artist, the author of such beloved songs as "Maggie May," "Tonight’s the Night," "Hot Legs," "Da Ya Think I’m Sexy?," "Young Turks," "Forever Young," and "You Wear It Well."  Now after more than five decades in the spotlight, he is finally ready to take a candid and romping look back at his life both on and off the stage. From his humble British roots to his hell-raising years on tour with his bandmates, not forgetting his great loves (including three marriages and eight children) and decades touring the world, Rod delivers a riveting ride through one of rock's most remarkable lives.



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Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 400 pages
  • Editeur : Crown Archetype; Édition : 1 (23 octobre 2012)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0307987302
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307987303
  • Dimensions du produit: 16,4 x 3,5 x 23,9 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 256.286 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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Format: Broché
This book has no co-writer, so Rod must have done the whole job by himself (?). It reads like a dictaphone job, like he would talk to you directly. A plus, absolutely. This carries for like 60 pages, where he he tells us about his family, growing up, first musical and sexual encounters - never bragging, on the contrary. He could have written a good book had he kept on like this. Unfortunately, there are whole chapters about hair (of course), trains, football, cars, collecting art. And then the marriages, the model and actress girl friends. From this moment on, I started to read diagonally whole parts of the book. Until to the middle, when I started to only check like every tenth page if there would be something of interest. Until I read this: "The following day, I got into serious trouble when the paparazzi snapped me drinking a can of Coca-Cola." On an event sponsored by Pepsi....

I put the book down.

Read the rest later: Now I know which one of his women loved sex as much as he does, I also learned to my astonishment that Rod is not too fond of his best song in my opinion, 'Da Ya Thing I'm Sexy' - also the seminal 'Blondes Have More Fun' gets the thumbs low from Rod himself. Well, that sort of explains why he made some bad judgements about what has to go into the book. A simple case of disputable taste, then.

On the plus side: A discography at the end. And, lest I forget: At last I know the reason why he did get those puffy cheecks in the 80's: special voice treatments a.k.a. doping.

So, the book has it's strong parts, but on the whole it certainly talks too superficially about the music, the musicians, the industry etc. And there are way too many fillers here. Dommage.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 693 commentaires
87 internautes sur 89 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Highly entertaining, whether you're a fan or not 21 novembre 2012
Par Phil Clapham - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Way back in the 1970's, I saw Rod Stewart acting like a petulant prima donna on a British TV program, and for a long time thereafter had him pegged as an immature twit, albeit one with a great voice. As someone who went to university in London in the mid-70's and saw just about every rock band that was worth seeing - plus a fair number who weren't - I was never a great Rod Stewart fan. I liked some of his songs - I would have absolutely killed to see the Faces play "Stay With Me" in concert - and appreciated his unique voice, but I never jumped wholeheartedly onto the Stewart bandwagon.

All of which somehow makes this autobiography all the more of a delightful surprise. It's lightly written, funny and informative. It's also charmingly self-deprecating; here is the voice of a former Bad Boy of Rock and Roll, all grown up and now looking back with the balance and wisdom of his later years.

The book is full of good behind-the-scenes stories that tell of bands, songs and relationships. We learn of Stewart's humble origins, his unsteady progress as a singer and harmonica player (he notes wryly that he was playing the latter badly for a year before someone pointed out that you could actually play the instrument by sucking as well as blowing into it), and the ups and downs of various bands and albums before fame and commercial success finally sunk their hooks into him for good. This happened in part because of his classic song Maggie May, which Stewart almost discarded from the Every Picture Tells A Story album because he didn't think much of it:

"When the Beatles finished `Please Please Me', George Martin allegedly clicked on the talkback and said, `Congratulations, boys, you've just recorded your first number one.' What would I have said had I spoken to the studio after finishing Maggie May? Probably, `Well, that's sort of OK, I suppose. Drink, anyone?'"

Originally released as the B side of a single, Maggie May was played widely by radio DJs in the States, and then in Britain, and this finally catapulted both the song and the album to number 1 at the same time in both countries (a feat which, Stewart notes, not even Elvis or the Beatles had managed).

Stewart avoids the temptation to use his autobiography to settle scores, and usually describes conflicts tactfully, despite telling us that, "as everyone in the business of rock'n'roll knows, the rule is as follows: in bands, there's always one c**t who no one gets on with." (Amazon won't allow the c word to be printed, even though it's a quote from the book). That he was a horrible and terminally unfaithful partner to his various wives and girlfriends he openly admits. The caricatured life of a star - literally sex, drugs and rock and roll - was too good to pass up, and Stewart indulged unceasingly and head first. At one point he confesses to spending a week in a prime hotel suite in the south of France, literally flying in one girl after another (his manager would drop off one girl at the airport and then head over to Arrivals to pick up the next to arrive).

And on the positive side, we get some great stories about his closest friends in the business; the tales of his long relationship with Elton John, including their constant practical jokes and one-upmanship, are particularly amusing. Not to mention the so-called Sex Police: members of the band who tried their best to stop any other band member from having sex with whatever groupie he'd brought back to the hotel after a concert. In one case, this involved removing every last piece of furniture from a musician's hotel suite and replacing it with live chickens. The afflicted band member duly returned and, acting as if nothing was amiss, proceeded to enjoy his girl anyway... as Stewart notes, the important thing was not to give your friends the satisfaction of seeing you inconvenienced or annoyed.

Along the way, we get amusing digressions on various topics ranging from his love of cars to Rod Stewart impersonators to the staggering amount of work involved in creating his hairdo... all of this related in a tone that makes it clear he never takes himself too seriously.

Viewed superficially, Stewart could be written off - as some have done - as a pretty boy with a good voice. But that does him a disservice: it's very clear from this book that a genuine love of great music was there from the beginning, and he has both appreciated and embraced genres that ranged widely from folk to blues to hard-core rock. Indeed, reading this book made me go back and listen to a "Best of" album (I highly recommend The Definitive Rod Stewart, a two-CD set that includes most of his best songs); in doing so, I recognized many of these influences, sometimes woven together to give a richer whole. Above it all, of course, is that famous raspy voice which, at its best, reflects Stewart's emotional investment in the lyrics (listen to his heartfelt rendering of Tom Waits' wonderful song Tom Traubert's Blues).

But overall, you don't have to love the guy to enjoy this book; it's a very entertaining romp through his career, and along the way it provides a highly readable history of the musical era in which he became famous.

And Rod Stewart - at least in his maturity - turns out to be a nice guy after all.
44 internautes sur 46 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Rare Memoir Told With Remarkable Candor 27 octobre 2012
Par G.I Gurdjieff - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
First off, I am a fan of Rod Stewart's and I may be a tad biased though I really don't think so.This book is interesting and loaded with Stewart's self-deprecating humor which makes it the easiest of reads. He takes his readers through his childhood and upbringing, the three wives, eight kids, and the much publicized romances. Couple that with a many decade long career, life on the road, career and personal ups and even some downs and the end product is a page turner from start to finish. As Stewart has proven time and again, he is the king of reinvention who manages to redefine himself over and over again. What emerges in this book is a Rod Stewart that is still sort of a rakish dog, bad boy, and capable of being vulnerable.
Stewart has managed to do with a book what he does consistently when he performs. He flirts, cajoles, and establishes an intimacy with his reader that is almost irresistible. This book is one of those special instances where the information is coming from the subject with a lot of honesty and heart. It seems as if he pretty much covers it all-----the good, the bad, and the ugly------and what is left is the many lives of Rod Stewart.
28 internautes sur 34 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Best read of the year. 1 novembre 2012
Par Mazza - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Well I have always been a huge fan of Rod Stewart's and of the Faces but this autobiography surpassed even all of my expectations. As well as being informative and putting right a lot of the myths and stories surrounding himself and his bands (and his relationships) over the years, the book is genuinely funny and made me laugh out loud in places. I loved the history of the early songs and album tracks, and particularly the stories of his early performing years with Long John Baldry. Of course the Scottish connection and tales of football matches and trips to Hampden to see his beloved Scottish team play (and usually get beaten) were fascinating, funny and evocative of my own young years being a die-hard Celtic and Scotland fan. In the book Rod Stewart speaks respectfully of his ex-wives and partners and very lovingly about his children. He comes across as being, at heart, a real family man, which you can read from the book stems from his own childhood within a very close and loving family. Can't rate this book highly enough - Rod Stewart is a great story-teller, song-writer, singer and, what do you know, comedian. What a read!!
13 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Lacks Substance 30 mai 2013
Par Darcia Helle - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Sometimes I read a musician's autobiography, and I like him/her more afterward. Other times, as with this one, I'm left wishing I hadn't read the book at all.

This felt more like bragging rights than telling the story of his life. I learned Rod Stewart is an unapologetic womanizer who loves football (soccer to those of us in the U.S.), trains, and flashy cars. And that's about all I learned.

Stewart comes from a modest family that appeared to be lower middle class. Yet, when his career takes off, he makes no mention of his family's reaction. Did he help them out financially? Were they happy for him? Were they envious? None of this is ever talked about. Aside from mentioning his brothers and father in the context of football, we learn nothing about their relationship.

There is an entire chapter on his hair. Granted, it's a short chapter and perhaps meant to be comical, but I did not need that much information on his grooming habits. There is also an enormous amount of football talk. I got the point that he loves the sport without the endless pages on the topic.

He takes us through all his relationships, with the women he lived with, married, and cheated with. He makes a point of letting us know they were all young and supermodels. Some had children already, so he briefly played stepfather. He also had a bunch of kids of his own along the way. (I lost count of how many.) Yet, aside from him pointing out what a big part he played in each of their births, it's like they didn't exist afterward. Was it hard for him to leave them when he toured? Did he take them? Did he ever see them after divorcing their mothers? After reading 400 pages, I don't know the answer to any of these questions.

I would hope there is more to Rod Stewart's life than the self-important fluff he writes about here. Though it says a lot about the man that this is what he chose to share.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
It was just okay. 26 novembre 2012
Par Amy Griffin - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Rod discussed many events that occured during his rise to fame. However, I never really felt like I got to know who he was as a person. I've been a big fan of his since the 70's, so I was hoping for more information about who he is. I felt he could have given more insight to who he is and how he was affected personally by the events in his life.
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