Commencez à lire Scarcity: Why having too little means so much sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Scarcity: Why having too little means so much
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

Scarcity: Why having too little means so much [Format Kindle]

Sendhil Mullainathan , Eldar Shafir

Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 14,14
Prix Kindle : EUR 7,58 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 6,56 (46%)

Applications de lecture gratuites Kindle Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 7,58  
Relié EUR 22,94  
Broché EUR 14,42  
CD, Livre audio, Version intégrale EUR 29,67  


Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

Stars in their respective disciplines, and the combination is greater than the sum of its parts. Their project has a unique feel to it: it is the finest combination of heart and head that I have seen in our field (Daniel Kahneman, author of 'Thinking, Fast and Slow')

Scarcity is a captivating book, overflowing with new ideas, fantastic stories, and simple suggestions that just might change the way you live (Steven D. Levitt, coauthor of 'Freakonomics')

Here is a winning recipe. Take a behavioral economist and a cognitive psychologist, each a prominent leader in his field, and let their creative minds commingle. What you get is a highly original and easily readable book that is full of intriguing insights. What does a single mom trying to make partner at a major law firm have in common with a peasant who spends half her income on interest payments? The answer is scarcity. Read this book to learn the surprising ways in which scarcity affects us all (Richard Thaler, co-author of 'Nudge')

An ultimately humane and very welcome book (Oliver Burkeman Guardian)

The book's unified theory of the scarcity mentality is novel in its scope and ambition (The Economist)

A succinct, digestible and often delightfully witty introduction to an important new branch of economics (Felix Martin New Statesman)

A pacey dissection of a potentially life-changing subject (Time Out)

Présentation de l'éditeur

Why can we never seem to keep on top of our workload, social diary or chores? Why does poverty persist around the world? Why do successful people do things at the last minute in a sudden rush of energy? Here, economist Sendhil Mullainathan and psychologist Eldar Shafir reveal that the hidden side of all these problems is that they're all about scarcity.



We've all struggled with packing a suitcase with too many items and not enough time to do it. In Scarcity, two intellectual adventurers show us that this simple idea explains the most fundamental problems in all walks of life. Using the new science of scarcity, they explain why obesity is rampant; why people find it difficult to sleep when most sleep deprived; and why the lonely find it so hard to make friends. Scarcity will change the way you think about both the little everyday tasks and the big issues of global urgency.



Sendhil Mullainathan is a Professor of Economics at Harvard, and a recipient of a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant". He conducts research on development economics, behavioral economics, and corporate finance. He is Executive Director of Ideas 42, Institute of Quantitative Social Science, Harvard University.



Eldar Shafir is William Stewart Tod Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University. Most of his work focuses on descriptive analyses of inference, judgment, and decision making, and on issues related to behavioral economics.



'Stars in their respective disciplines, and the combination is greater than the sum of its parts. Their project has a unique feel to it: it is the finest combination of heart and head that I have seen in our field', Daniel Kahneman, author of Thinking, Fast and Slow



'Scarcity is a captivating book, overflowing with new ideas, fantastic stories, and simple suggestions that just might change the way you live'


Steven D. Levitt, coauthor of Freakonomics



'Here is a winning recipe. Take a behavioral economist and a cognitive psychologist, each a prominent leader in his field, and let their creative minds commingle. What you get is a highly original and easily readable book that is full of intriguing insights. What does a single mom trying to make partner at a major law firm have in common with a peasant who spends half her income on interest payments? The answer is scarcity. Read this book to learn the surprising ways in which scarcity affects us all', Richard Thaler, co-author of Nudge


Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur les auteurs

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 étoiles sur 5  112 commentaires
79 internautes sur 86 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Bringing Sociology to an Economic concept 3 septembre 2013
Par Daniel Estes - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
There's a passage from the introduction where the authors tell a colleague about their research for this book, and the colleague replies, "There's already a science of scarcity. You might have heard of it. It's called economics." The authors then go on to defend why their particular focus is unique, though I must admit I was skeptical too. I just didn't see how this subject would go from the abstract to something nearer to my own experience. Fortunately, my concern was unfounded. Some fancy-sounding words are thrown about (tunneling, bandwidth and slack, for example, sound more mathematical than not) but how they're applied in real life is what makes the study of scarcity practical and familiar.

I've had a saying for years now, "When you're up and life's going your way, the choices are easy. It's the choices you make when you're down on your luck or in failure's grip that says the most about your character--about who you really are." This book is a partial scientific explanation about why this is true. The sections on poverty, especially, demonstrate just how limited the choices are for the poor. Certain groups of people--those in positions of power, the wealthy, the well-educated--they simply have more resources to weather the bumps in life.

I recommend this one. The playing field may never be leveled though that doesn't mean we shouldn't try. What's important is that in the process of doing so we need to be aware that everyone faces life's problems from different starting points and often with a wide variety of advantages and disadvantages.
55 internautes sur 59 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 in defense of a war against poverty, not against the poor 3 octobre 2013
Par Naima - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
There is a popular misconception in America, one few outside our borders understand, that the poor among us are financially constrained because they deserve it, they earned it, they aren't smart enough to avoid it. They make worse choices than the haves because they don't think things through, and have to live with those consequences. Explain, then, the experiment in which Princeton students (hardly an unintelligent lot) are randomized to "wealthy" vs "poor" teams in a game at the end of which the wealthy consistently do better than the poor. Underlying intelligence didn't drive the result; randomization to wealth vs poverty, to nonchalance vs desperation, did. That decision-making under pressure is often sub-optimal may seem obvious to some, but it is easily forgotten by others. And it is not a problem of just the poor, due to financial constraints, but of the high-powered business elites due to time constraints, and hopeful obese in their calorie constraints. The main difference being, of course, that no matter how busy you are, you can take a break from business by going on vacation. No matter how much weight you have to lose, you can take a break from your diet, and splurge on dessert one night. But if you're poor, there is no break, no respite, no time-out to allow you to recharge. And that makes all the difference.

Understanding this fundamental challenge can help each and every one of us in daily decision-making for ourselves (build in slack if you're busy; set reasonable goals for a diet), but more importantly, encourages us to soften our critique of the poor decisions we judge in others. This book couldn't have arrived at a better time in American politics. I only hope the busy judges among us find the time to read it.
188 internautes sur 215 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 an underachievement for the authors 14 septembre 2013
Par KristofS - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I once heard Sendhil Mullainathan speak at an event in DC, and he was smart and engaging. He's a MacArthur Foundation genius, a Harvard economist, and a TED speaker. He has a wry sense of humor and tells anecdotes from his personal life to make his economics work come alive. And all of that is in this book, written with his long-time collaborator, Eldar Shafir, who's a Princeton psychologist.

Still this book was a bit of a disappointment, possibly because I expected so much. A lot of the conclusions are, well, obvious. The book's entire thesis can be summarized as: "People make bad decisions when they are resource-constrained, whether the resources in question are money, time, food, or something else." Some of it recaps what has been said before about hyperbolic discounting in economics.

The book's chapters go like this...

Intro - definition of "scarcity" and overview of its consequences
Chap. 1 - The good: scarcity can cause focus. The bad: focus can mean inattention to other things.
Chap. 2 - Scarcity causes an internal disruption that makes it harder to make good decisions.
Chap. 3 - Slack (the opposite of scarcity) allows better choices and reduces the bad consequences of failiure.
Chap. 4 - Poor people are sometimes more realistic about estimating costs, because they have to be.
Chap. 5 - Borrowing when you're short of cash leads to a descending spiral of debt.
Chap. 6 & 7 - Poverty is a vicious circle of scarcity leading to bad decisions leading to scarcity...
Chap. 8 - Poverty can be alleviated by creating slack, such as extra cash or day care to create more time.
Chap. 9 - Efficient use of resources and division of labor helps organizations become more efficient.
Chap. 10 - Efficient use of self-control helps with life issues.

On the positive side, the book contains some interesting stories, and a rich set of endnotes to track down the many studies the authors cite. On the negative side, the book keeps talking about how mainstream economics is traditionally (for example, that people are "rational" decision makers), just so the authors can tear down the mainstream view. Economists come across as completely clueless, which maybe they are. Is it really surprising that when you're poor, hungry, and stressed, that you would make less than rational decisions?

Mullainathan and Shafir seem aware of this problem with the book. Chap. 2 contains some defensive passages about how bad decisions under scarcity are different from bad decisions due to stress. The explanation isn't compelling, and unlike most of their other claims, that passage doesn't have lots of studies to back it up.

The most interesting study in the book is one about street vendors in India who are in perpetual debt from a loan-sell-repay cycle (Chap. 6). The researchers give the vendors a cash grant to pay off their debts, which should have allowed them to start saving a little and eventually eliminate the need for borrowing altogether. One by one, though, the vendors fall back into debt. Any non-economist would see this as challenges of personality or habit. It's the same reason why couch potatos find it hard to get off the couch and exercise everyday. The authors, though, somehow turn this into a story of scarcity. How it was because there wasn't enough slack. Why don't they do an experiment where they give everyone a little extra cash to save? They don't, though, and I'd bet good money that with additional cash, the vendors would still have fallen back into debt eventually. What the vendors need is some training and hand-holding.

This study illustrates one of the biggest problems with the book. In order to make a case for the centrality of scarcity, the authors go too far. Not every bad decision is about scarcity. Sometimes, people are dumb, and sometimes there are dumb people. And sometimes, people are smart, and there are also smart people. At one point, the authors write, "all people, if they were poor, would have less effective bandwidth." Not sure about that. My grandmother managed seven kids and ran a shop, but she was dirt poor until her children grew up.
9 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Scarcity 16 septembre 2013
Par EconProf - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
"Scarcity" is the rare book that challenges intuitions about the world around us. Why do the poor sometimes appear neglectful of opportunities to decrease their debt? Why do chronically busy people often appear to only have themselves to blame? It's easy to attribute cause to features of the individual (they're lazy or scatterbrained) or economic constraints (they're short on money or time), but this book convincingly shows that these common arguments may miss a big piece of the puzzle: The feeling of "having too little" itself changes how we think in potentially counterproductive ways. I can't recommend this book highly enough.
18 internautes sur 21 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Worth your time 3 septembre 2013
Par Sheila Gallagher - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a fair and honest review.

This book breaks down scarcity and lean times in easy to understand language. It reminds me of FREAKANOMICS. I did not have to know anything about economics. A layperson can understand what the authors are saying. There is humor in it. I laughed but I also was able to see how I do the same things the poor (or the busy) do in regards to good times versus lean times (extra time versus deadlines). I hope that I will make the necessary changes to save during prosperous times (or free time) for the lean times. It opened my eyes to what I am doing wrong and proposes what I can do for the future.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique