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Self-Editing for Fiction Writers, Second Edition: How to Edit Yourself Into Print [Format Kindle]

Renni Browne , Dave King

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Hundreds of books have been written on the art of writing. Here at last is a book by two professional editors to teach writers the techniques of the editing trade that turn promising manuscripts into published novels and short stories.

In this completely revised and updated second edition, Renni Browne and Dave King teach you, the writer, how to apply the editing techniques they have developed to your own work. Chapters on dialogue, exposition, point of view, interior monologue, and other techniques take you through the same processes an expert editor would go through to perfect your manuscript. Each point is illustrated with examples, many drawn from the hundreds of books Browne and King have edited.

Biographie de l'auteur

Renni Browne, once senior editor for William Morrow and other companies, left mainstream publishing in 1980 to found The Editorial Department, a national book-editing company.



Dave King is a contributing editor at Writer's Digest. He also works as an independent editor in his home in rural Ashfield, Massachusetts.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 373 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 292 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 0060545690
  • Editeur : HarperCollins e-books; Édition : 2 Sub (15 juin 2010)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B003JBI2YI
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°132.825 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5  311 commentaires
86 internautes sur 86 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Maybe now I can be published! 9 août 2006
Par Mark J. Fowler - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
You wouldn't be here if you weren't interested in writing. Perhaps, like me, you also wouldn't be here unless you had also experienced some degree of professional rejection of the manuscript you thought was full of promise.

I sent my as-yet-unpublished novel to a literary agent. I wasn't surprised to not be accepted - there are plenty of famous stories of rejection of everyone from Tom Clancy to Stephen King - but I was encouraged to receive a page of constructive criticism from the agent. Among his suggestions: Read Browne and King's "Self-Editing". I did and immediately the glaring deficiencies of my manuscript stood out as plainly as a Naked Cowboy in Times Square. I took these words to heart and reworked the entire manuscript. I have no idea if the manuscript will find a professional home - but I am certain it is better, much better, than it was.
48 internautes sur 48 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A Summary By the Authors Themselves... 8 octobre 2008
Par Ralph White - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
This is a verbatim handout in a clinic the authors taught in 1990 in New York. Each item on the following self-editing checklist is a deal-breaker for your blockbuster. Your manuscript likely has many of them. Buy this essential book; understand what the checklist items refer to, and start self-editing.

1) SHOW(ing) AND TELL(ing): As you re-read your work, watch for places where you tell your readers about personality traits, situations, or emotions, rather than showing them through actions and events.

2) DIALOGUE DIRECTIVES: Watch like a hawk for places where you've explained your dialog. Watch for "ly" adverbs and verbs for speech other than "said." And rethink your paragraphing.

3) SEE HOW IT SOUNDS: Read a passage of dialogue, narration, or description aloud and listen for the unconscious changes.

4) EASY BEATS: Beware of including either beats that describe dialogue or so many beats that the dialogue is choppy.

5) INTERIOR MONOLOGUE: As with beats, make sure your interior monologue isn't obtrusive or actually an explanation in disguise. Also, dispense with stage directions whenever possible.

6) SOPHISTICATION: Watch for "as" and "-ing" constructions and change the sentences that don't actually require these constructions.

7) BREAKING UP IS EASY TO DO: Break up lengthy sections of narration or descriptions with frequent paragraphs, or with dialogue, or even with the occasional one or two line paragraph.

8) POINT OF VIEW: Watch for places where you change point of view in the middle of a scene. If the change is necessary, insert a linespace and start a new scene.

9) ONCE IS USUALLY ENOUGH: Look for places in which you've accomplished essentially the same thing twice. Decide which of the two is strongest and cut the weaker phrase, sentence, or entire scene.

10) VOICE: As you read over your work, highlight the passages that please you most. Then highlight the passages that displease you and work to turn the one into the other.

11) PROPORTION: As ou read, ask yourself what interests you the most. Then take a look at what's left and decide whether it's really needed.

12) CHARACTER DESCRIPTIONAND EXPOSITION: Don't describe your characters all at once. Let your readers meet them slowly, naturally.

13) DON'T LET THEM SEE YOU SWEAT: Beware of words like "very" and "rather," strings of adjectives, fancy imagery, overuse of italics, and exclamation points.

14) ELLIPSIS: Check your work for blow-by-blow descriptions and work to condense them.
118 internautes sur 127 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 A breezy read 26 août 2008
Par Graham Gersdorff - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Renni Browne and Dave King have written a better than average book on craft for fiction writers. It covers the following topics:

1. Showing not telling
2. Characterization & exposition
3. Point of view
4. Proportion
5. Dialog mechanics
6. How the text sounds
7. Interior monologue
8. Beats (character actions between bits of dialog)
9. Sentence/paragraph/chapter breaks
10. Repetition
11. Sophisticated versus amateur style
12. Voice

They include passages from works of famous writers as well as of clients of their own editing service in showing how to address errors. They also provide exercises, and in the appendix, suggested answers to those exercises. Excellent.
The book is certainly worth reading, but I am concerned they missed the forest for the trees in certain places. The best example of my concern is in the first chapter on showing not telling. The authors take issue with the following line from F. Scott Fiztgerald's The Great Gatsby:

The two girls and Jordan leaned together confidentially.

The "problem" is the ly-adverb "confidentially". The authors suggest it would be stronger to eliminate this adverb explaining the girls' emotion, and instead write the following:

The two girls and Jordan leaned their heads together.

Their rule is to avoid using adverbs to tell the reader which emotions the characters are experiencing, and instead convey their emotion by dialog and actions. This is a perfectly reasonable rule, and I agree it should be followed, most of the time. In the above example however, the rewritten version doesn't quite convey what Fitzgerald intended. There could be many reasons for the girls to have leaned their heads together. They could have been tired from the party and from the alcohol they consumed, for example, and simply flopped their heads to one side in exhaustion. The notion that they leaned closer to gossip was lost when the word "confidentially" was removed. To address this, we could give a more detailed explanation of exactly how they leaned together. Here is my suggestion:

The two girls and Jordan leaned their heads together, glanced from side to side, and lowered their voices.

A problem with my version however, is that the longer explanation might interrupt the flow of the scene. None of us can get into Fitzgerald's head, but I'd like to offer a reasonable guess regarding his reason for using the dread ly-adverb. Most of us have a mental image of how a group of gossiping girls behaves. The word "confidentially" encapsulates this mental image, and adequately conveys the mood of the scene. It's a shortcut, and if it's not overused, it can be effective. I sense the authors are too rigid in the application of their rules.

FINAL QUESTION: Would The Great Gatsby have been a better novel if F. Scott Fitzgerald had not made "mistakes" like the one above? I doubt it. For me, Dave King and Renni Browne lost credibility when they began line editing a novel of that stature. Most readers agree the novel has an essence that goes beyond such mechanical issues. That's what I meant at the beginning when I said the authors may have lost the forest for the trees.
21 internautes sur 22 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 An invaluable tool for the beginning writer 5 novembre 2006
Par Brian Hawkinson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
I would have to say that this book should be a must for all aspiring authors. Even, dare I say, to many established authors who make many of the mistakes that this book talks about. And I don't say this because I blindly follow what this book says. Nay, I have read books and I have been annoyed or bothered by their unrealistic dialogue, their page long speeches over and over again, using too much description, and finally the author patronizing the reader by trying to force feed everything. That is why I found this book to be amazing, because what I had already been shaking my head at was found in this book to be big no-nos.

That being said I was amazed while reading. There were some chapters that were rather basic, such as chapter 1, "Show and Tell", but then there were other chapters that I know, as an amateur writer, will greatly help my already written work as well anything in the future. Such chapters as "Proportion", "Dialogue Mechanics" and "Breaking Up Is Easy To Do" are all great chapters.

I would most definitely recommend this book to all beginning writers, even to those already established just to refresh their editing styles. A quick read that is well worth it.

5 stars.
9 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Like my college course on fiction writing 21 octobre 2005
Par L. Harvey - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
If you look at the front cover of this book it looks like the book is about fixing grammatical mistakes and typos. Not so. This book covers issues such as showing rather than telling, voice, and avoiding repetitious language. The key to what makes this book work is the many before-and-after examples the authors use -- including from published works. The small amount of grammatical instruction focuses on accepted modern style, such as saying "Bob said" rather than "said Bob". This stuff is invaluable -- like a very smart critique group. I'd love to see the authors come out with a workbook, so we had even more examples, but there are many exercises at the end of each chapter.
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