undrgrnd Cliquez ici Toys NEWNEEEW nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos FIFA16 cliquez_ici Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo
Sense and Sensibility et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus
Acheter d'occasion
EUR 0,01
+ EUR 2,99 (livraison)
D'occasion: Très bon | Détails
Vendu par -betterworldbooks-
État: D'occasion: Très bon
Commentaire: Condition très bonne pour un livre d'occasion. Usure minime. Sous garantie de remboursement complet. Plus de plus d'un million clients satisfaits! Votre alphabétisation dans le monde achat avantages!
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 3 images

Sense and Sensibility (Anglais) Broché – 1 décembre 1995


Voir les formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
Relié
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 18,90 EUR 0,74
Broché, 1 décembre 1995
EUR 2,45 EUR 0,01
Broché
"Veuillez réessayer"
Cassette
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 80,04

Rentrée Littéraire 2015 : découvrez toutes les nouveautés de la rentrée en livre et ebook Rentrée Littéraire 2015 : découvrez toutes les nouveautés de la rentrée en livre et ebook

--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché.

Livres anglais et étrangers
Lisez en version originale. Cliquez ici

Offres spéciales et liens associés


Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Sense and Sensibility, the first of those metaphorical bits of "ivory" on which Jane Austen said she worked with "so fine a brush," jackhammers away at the idea that to conjecture is a vain and hopeless reflex of the mind. But I'll venture this much: If she'd done nothing else, we'd still be in awe of her. Wuthering Heights alone put Emily Brontë in the pantheon, and her sister Charlotte and their older contemporary Mary Shelley might as well have saved themselves the trouble of writing anything but Jane Eyre and Frankenstein. Sense and Sensibility, published in 1811, is at least as mighty a work as any of these, and smarter than all three put together. And it would surely impress us even more without Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815) towering just up ahead. Austen wrote its ur-version, Elinor and Marianne, when she was nineteen, a year before First Impressions, which became Pride and Prejudice; she reconceived it as Sense and Sensibility when she was twenty-two, and she was thirty-six when it finally appeared. Like most first novels, it lays out what will be its author's lasting preoccupations: the "three or four families in a country village" (which Austen told her niece, in an often-quoted letter, was "the very thing to work on"). The interlocking anxieties over marriages, estates, and ecclesiastical "livings." The secrets, deceptions, and self-deceptions that take several hundred pages to straighten out-to the extent that they get straightened out. The radical skepticism about human knowledge, human communication, and human possibility that informs almost every scene right up to the sort-of-happy ending. And the distinctive characters-the negligent or overindulgent parents, the bifurcating siblings (smart sister, beautiful sister; serious brother, coxcomb brother), the charming, corrupted young libertines. Unlike most first novels, though, Sense and Sensibility doesn't need our indulgence. It's good to go.

In the novels to come, Elinor Dashwood will morph into Anne Elliott and Elizabeth Bennet (who will morph into Emma Woodhouse); Edward Ferrars into Edmund Bertram, Mr. Knightley, Henry Tilney, and Captain Wentworth; Willoughby into George Wickham and Henry Crawford. But the characters in Sense and Sensibility stand convincingly on their own, every bit as memorable as their later avatars. If Austen doesn't have quite the Caliban-to-Ariel range of a Shakespeare, she can still conjure up and sympathize with both Mrs. Jennings-the "rather vulgar" busybody with a borderline-unwholesome interest in young people's love lives, fits of refreshing horse sense, and a ruggedly good heart-and Marianne Dashwood, a wittily observed case study in Romanticism, a compassionately observed case study in sublimated adolescent sexuality, and a humorously observed case study in humorlessness. "I should hardly call her a lively girl," Elinor observes to Edward, "-she is very earnest, very eager in all she does-sometimes talks a great deal and always with animation-but she is not often really merry." Humorlessness, in fact, may be the one thing Marianne and her eventual lifemate, Colonel Brandon, have in common. (Sorry to give that plot point away; it won't be the last one, either. So, fair warning.) The minor characters have the sort of eidetic specificity you associate with Dickens: from the gruesomely mismatched Mr. and Mrs. Palmer to Robert Ferrars, splendidly impenetrable in his microcephalic self-complacency. The major characters, on the other hand, refuse to stay narrowly "in character"; they're always recognizably themselves, yet they seem as many-sided and changeable as people out in the nonfictional world.

Elinor makes as ambivalent a heroine as Mansfield Park's notoriously hard-to-warm-up-to Fanny Price. She's affectionately protective of her sister Marianne yet overfond of zinging her: "It is not every one who has your passion for dead leaves." She's bemused at Marianne's self-dramatizing, yet she's as smug about suffering in silence as Marianne (who "would have thought herself very inexcusable" if she were able to sleep after Willoughby leaves Devonshire) is proud of suffering in Surround Sound. She can be treacherously clever, as when Lucy Steele speculates (correctly) that she may have offended Elinor by staking her claim to Edward: " 'Offended me! How could you suppose so? Believe me,' and Elinor spoke it with the truest sincerity, 'nothing could be farther from my intention, than to give you such an idea.' " Yet she can also be ponderously preachy: "One observation may, I think, be fairly drawn from the whole of the story-that all Willoughby's difficulties, have arisen from the first offense against virtue, in his behaviour to Eliza Williams. That crime has been the origin of every lesser one, and of all his present discontents." (In the rest of Austen, only the intentionally preposterous Mary in Pride and Prejudice strikes just this note: "Unhappy as the event may be for Lydia, we may draw from it this useful lesson; that loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable . . ."). Is Elinor simply an intelligent young woman overtaxed by having to be the grown-up of the family? Or is she an unconsciously rivalrous sibling, sick of hearing that her younger, more beautiful sister will marry more advantageously? Or both? Or what? It's not that Austen doesn't have a clear conception of her-it's that she doesn't have a simple conception. Elinor is the character you know the most about, since Austen tells most of the story from her point of view, and consequently she's the one you're least able to nail with a couple of adjectives or a single defining moment.

Edward bothers us, too. He's a dreamboat only for a woman of Elinor's limited expectations: independent-minded yet passive and depressive, forthright and honorable yet engaged in a book-long cover-up. (It's a tour de force on Austen's part to present a character so burdened with a secret that we see his natural behavior only long after we've gotten used to him.) At his strongest and most appealing-to Elinor, at least-he's a clear-your-mind-of-cant kind of guy: "I am not fond of nettles, or thistles, or heath blossoms. . . . A troop of tidy, happy villagers please me better than the finest banditti in the world." But he can also be a Hamlet-like whiner, complaining about his own idleness and vowing that his sons will be brought up "to be as unlike myself as possible. In feeling, in action, in condition, in every thing." For my money, Edward is the least likable of Austen's heroes, while his opposite number, Willoughby, is the most sympathetic of her libertines: smarter than Pride and Prejudice's Wickham (a loser who gets stuck with the "noisy" and virtually portionless Lydia Bennet) and more warmhearted than Mansfield Park's textbook narcissist Henry Crawford. Willoughby may strike trendy Wordsworthian poses with his effusions on cottages ("I consider it as the only form of building in which happiness is attainable"), but at least he has enough sense to abhor his own callowness, and enough sexy boldness to discompose even the rational Elinor. "She felt that his influence over her mind was heightened by circumstances which ought not in reason to have weight; by that person of uncommon attraction, that open, affectionate, and lively manner which it was no merit to possess . . ." His opening line when he at last explains to her what he's been up to ("Tell me honestly, do you think me most a knave or a fool?") is one of those Byronic flourishes that make him the person in Sense and Sensibility you'd most want to dine with and least want to trust. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

Revue de presse

"As nearly flawless as any fiction could be."
—Eudora Welty --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .



Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 272 pages
  • Editeur : Dover Publications Inc.; Édition : New edition (1 décembre 1995)
  • Collection : Dover Thrift Editions
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0486290492
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486290492
  • Dimensions du produit: 1,9 x 13,3 x 21 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (13 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 188.377 en Livres (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres)
  • Table des matières complète
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?


En savoir plus sur les auteurs

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre

(En savoir plus)
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

5.0 étoiles sur 5
5 étoiles
13
4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
Voir les 13 commentaires client
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Commentaires client les plus utiles

5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par roseB (France) TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS le 17 mars 2012
Format: Broché
J'ai lu tous les romans de Jane Austen et pour certains d'entre eux plusieurs fois (à l'exception de persuasion)....Dans ce roman Jane Austen nous offre la plus large palette de personnages tous différents tant dans leur caractère, leur histoire individuelle, leur statut, leur rang de naissance....

DONC 5 ETOILES , pour les raisons suivantes:

- le plaisir pur de se laisser glisser et griser par le style inimitable de Jane Austen, qui toujours avec élégance et souvent beaucoup d'humour décrit sans complaisance ni mièvrerie la société anglaise victorienne. Pour toutes celles et ceux qui ne connaissent pas cette époque, ce roman est un TEMOIGNAGE EXEMPLAIRE du cloisonnement de cette société qui peut briser des êtres en les empêchant de choisir leur vie, leur destin professionnel, leur amour, leur mariage....

- dans tous ses romans Jane Austen s'est attachée à défendre la condition des femmes et les peu de droit qu'elles possédaient, ICI NOUS RETROUVONS UNE DESCRIPTION de cette condition féminine à travers le destin de 2 soeurs : Miss Dashwood et sa soeur cadette Marianne principalement. Mais les femmes sont présentes avec aussi leurs travers en particulier l'insupportable Mrs John Daswood, où la mère des deux soeurs Daswood, complètement "dépassée" après le décès de son mari, Je vous laisse découvrir le caractère complétement exubérant limite excentrique de Lady Middleton... qui nous offre par sa franchise et parfois son sans gène des pages exquises de rire... a real match-maker!
Lire la suite ›
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Pascal Gallez le 2 janvier 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Edition fidèle à l'original, qui coûte deux francs trois sous, si bien que ce livre est un fidèle compagnon de voyage vis à vis duquel on aura aucun remord, quand on l'abandonne, lecture terminée, dans une guesthouse birmane, indienne ou indonésienne (dans ce cas, abandon au rocher d'or; bonne lecture à son prochain propriétaire :)...).

Que dire de Sense & Sensibility qui n'aurait pas déjà été dit... rien, je suppose et me tais donc en ce qui concerne l'oeuvre (magistrale) d'Austen.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Nina Dauphin le 20 juin 2014
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Un merveilleux roman de mariage dans la campagne anglaise du XIXe siècle. Issues la petite aristocratie de campagne, après la mort du père, la veuve et ses trois filles se retrouvent déclassées faute d'héritier mâle mais vont se créer une nouvelle vie et une nouvelle société où les rencontres amoureuses vont les mettre à l'épreuve. L'aînée Elinor est remarquable par sa retenue, son caractère raisonnable tandis que Marianne se donne sans réserve à une rencontre peut-être douteuse. Au travers de ses amours, une peinture du féminin enserré dans une éducation ultra-codifiée et un destin déterminé par le mariage. A l'intérieur de ces contraintes, des tempéraments se déchaînent dans l'intimité de la famille, espèrent et désespèrent dans l'attente de la fameuse proposition. Consolation : une solidarité infinie entre femmes.
Facile à lire en anglais avec un vocabulaire délicieusement désuet
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Par Renée le 30 août 2011
Format: Broché
You'll find in this particular edition the highly interesting original Penguin Classics introduction by Tony Tanner, who quotes Freud and Foucault to prove that Marianne is a true Romantic character, which is quite an unusual idea about Austen: she is rather known to mock Romanticism in her work- in fact, as always, she mocks the appearance of it, the make-believe, not the sincere feeling.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Par Perrot le 18 novembre 2011
Format: Broché
Je connaissais déjà "Pride and Prejudice" que j'avais dévoré. J'ai voulu donc lire "Sense and Sensibilty", dont j'avais déjà vu la version filmée de la BBC, et qui m'avais beaucoup plu. Je ne suis pas du tout déçue par ce roman: histoire qui nous prend, personnages attachants, lecture très agréable. On n'a pas envie de lâcher le livre! On est dans l'histoire.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
J'adore l'écriture de Jane Austen dont les phrases à double tranchant se raille des travers des personnages sans en avoir l'air. on ne reste cependant pas insensible aux doutes amoureux de ces demoiselles. Rafraichissant.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
After watching the movie by Ang Lee, I wanted to read the novel. It was great, I read it with the actors' faces and voices in my mind. A keen observation of the time's mores. Entertaining and instructive.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?