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Speaker for the Dead
 
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Speaker for the Dead [Format Kindle]

Orson Scott Card
4.2 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

Amazon.com

Ender Wiggin, the hero and scapegoat of mass alien destruction in Ender's Game, receives a chance at redemption in this novel. Ender, who proclaimed as a mistake his success in wiping out an alien race, wins the opportunity to cope better with a second race, discovered by Portuguese colonists on the planet Lusitania. Orson Scott Card infuses this long, ambitious tale with intellect by casting his characters in social, religious and cultural contexts. Like its predecessor, this book won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards.

From Publishers Weekly

Card's novel Ender's Game introduced Ender Wiggin, a young genius who used his military prowess to all but exterminate the "buggers," the first alien race mankind had ever encountered. Wiggin then transformed himself into the "Speaker for the Dead," who claimed it had been a mistake to destroy the alien civilization. Many years later, when a new breed of intelligent life forms called the "piggies" is discovered, Wiggin takes the opportunity to atone for his earlier actions. This long, rich and ambitious novel views the interplay between the races from the differing perspectives of the colonists, ethnologists, biologists, clergy, politicians, a computer artificial intelligence, the lone surviving bugger and the piggies themselves. Card is very good at portraying his characters in these larger, social, religious and cultural contexts. It's unfortunate, then, that many of the book's mysteries and dilemmas seem created just to display Ender's supposedly godlike understanding. A fine, if overlong, novel nonetheless.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2121 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 419 pages
  • Editeur : Tor Books; Édition : Author's Definitive Edition (30 novembre 2009)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B003H4I4JU
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.2 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°23.991 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Orson Scott Card (né et vivant aux Etats-Unis) est l'un des aute urs de science-fiction (la série Ender), de fantasy (les chroniques d'Alvin le faiseur) et de romans historiques les plus connus, lus et estimés dans le monde. Il a remporté le prix Hugo et le prix Nébula deux années consécutives, pour La Stratégie Ender et sa suite, La voix des morts, exploit sans précédent.

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Commentaires client les plus utiles
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Great book but so many typos! 20 janvier 2012
Format:Format Kindle
I would have given this book the full five stars if it weren't for the fact that the Kindle edition is littered with typos.
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Almost as good as thé classic Ender's Game 20 mars 2014
Par Bob D
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Well written sequel. Some Nice twists and turns. A good read. I'll certainly read thé next in thé séries. Not quite à classic in thé same way, but i recommend it.
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 We shall never cease from exploration 5 février 2014
Par bernie
Format:Format Kindle
We shall never cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time. - T. S. Eliot

We start off where the last book ended. Now Ender the writer of "The Hive Queen and the Hegemon", after traveling three thousand years of penance as a Speaker for the Dead is summoned to a planet where there is a new race and an opportunity to put things right.

Even though the author says that you can read this book as a complete story without reading the first novel it is actually part of a five book series. True the essential background will be repeated or contemplated in this volume it is still not as complete as reading the first volume.

Once again you can bypass the introduction but then you will have missed crucial information on the author and his intent. The introduction can also be used as part of a good writing course.

The first book was thinly veiled as a version of "Starship Troopers" and you can see that somewhere the author must have read some field manuals. In "Speaker for the Dead" you can see that Orson Scott Card knows his Catechism. I used to teach RCIA so he could not fake it. I also come from a strong LDS background. I suspect he spiced it up with a little "Tony Hillerman." Our main character may have changed focus a tad form the first book but people change, authors change, and we change.

The only part of the writing the did not go too smoothly was the inclusion of references to "The Tempest" it seemed a tad forced where other authors such as Dorothy Sayers for example with "stale flat and unprofitable" would not be spotted if one had not read "Hamlet" but it fits her story like a glove.

I can see why this book has a problem with being pigeonholed as sci-fi or space opera, etc. as it has all the elements needed to thinly veil a message. What is the message you ask? Read the book.
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1 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Card dépasse carrément ses promesses 2 novembre 2000
Format:Relié
Après Ender's Game, Card apporte la rédemption, la maturité, la question de la survie de l'espèce et une perspective novatrice du respect des morts et des hommages qu'on leur rend. Sur Lusithania, Ender préfère qu'on l'appelle Andrew, et déchire les barrières qu'une famille s'est imposée.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 étoiles sur 5  1.462 commentaires
290 internautes sur 299 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Ender's Game? No. Impressive? Definitely. 25 avril 2000
Par Dan Dean - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
I went through various stages of opinion while reading this book... First was, "Hey- why is this nothing like Ender's Game? Drats!" Then, "What is with all this Portuguese stuff, and religious garbage?" and "Why is Ender some kind of space-detective?" And so I began trudging through this book with a lack of enthusiasm. Then slowly but steadily, this story pulls you in. You don't mind the lack of Game's glorious action. This is a very mature piece.
I doubt that anyone will be able to read Ender's Game and stop there. You want more. Speaker for the Dead is where you have to go. I find it extremely hard to consider this a sequel, because never have I seen an author switch his style this drastically within one series. Card forces you to accept all of his changes, but those who adapt to this book are highly rewarded! I found myself involved with Card's characters quite alarmingly, and touched by his themes on so many levels.
One thing that really impressed me- Card takes our first intelligent contact with aliens and compares it with 16th century European explorers encountering the natives of South America. It shows the barriers of language, technology, religion, and misunderstandings -as well as mankind's need to control or dominate any new race it meets. This book is like a history lesson that teaches us not to make the same mistakes when we reach this point of our future. Very interesting.
There is no doubt I will be continuing this series.
252 internautes sur 277 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Orson Scott Card's best work 7 août 1999
Par J. Angus Macdonald - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
As a habit, I avoid best sellers. When I heard there was a sequel to Ender's Game, I shuddered. That book had affected me so deeply, I could not imagine a sequel to it.
This book is in all ways, barring one, superior.
This book reminds me of Ursula LeGuin at her best, and I do not invoke her name lightly. She is one of the few sci-fi authors who understands something of anthropology and, more importantly, the human condition. Card in this one books has levelled with her.
Ender is a far richer and deeper character in this book than he was in Ender's Game. Here he is having to live with his own guilt and the positive and negative aspects of his own legend. He has inspired a cult of sorts, the Speakers of the Dead, people who speak not well of the dead, but realistically. How does one live with such a legacy?
The Piggies are intrinsicly fascinating. They are not small humans. They are not just randomly acting individuals. They act in a consistent, rational manner -- once you know all the peices of the puzzle. Most of these peices are not revealed except with time. Jane is also fascinating. "She" acts in a logical manner as well, but again it is not a HUMAN manner. The Hive Queen is very real and, again, not human. There is a delicate balance inherent in this book.
This book is far superior to Ender's Game, a book which is one of those rare sci-fi novels that I have read twice. It speaks to the core of humanity within us all, it speaks to our fears, our dreams, our hatreds, our prejudices, our nobility, our failings, and our longings. It is not a shoot-em-up. This book is literature, not science fiction. It may be read again with profit. It is not a book about plot and action (thank all the powers!). It is a book about being humnan.
I put a reservation in here, one way in which the book does NOT match Ender's Game. The ending of this book is abrupt and calls out for a sequel. This is quite sad. Ender's Game stands on its own; Speaker for the Dead calls out for a conclusion. Aside from that, this is a superlative book. No, not for everyone; name me a book that is for everyone. But in the end, an intelligent reader will gain much from reading Speaker for the Dead.
96 internautes sur 107 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A landmark of sci-fi and humanism 2 juillet 2000
Par William Krischke - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
As he tells us in the introduction (which is, by the way, the best introduction I've ever read), this is the book Card intended to write when he began the ever-popular Ender series. Ender's Game was simply a prologue -- originally a short story.
There are so many good things about this book. Card has a talent for writing deep, real characters that I've never seen in sci-fi and seldom in any modern literature. He is a master storyteller, and this book is wonderfully paced -- you will continually be twisting your brain trying to uncover what is up with the pequeninos before the scientists do.
But most of all, this book is a eloquent manifesto of humanism. As Speaker for the Dead, it is our hero Ender's lifelong task to understand people and tell the truth about them -- a truth that will reveal their good, bad, and ugly, but most importantly, their inherent worth and um, goodness. This truth-seeking carries from the individual to the entire races, as Card (and Ender) examine how we relate to those we don't understand, even those we can't understand.
So what is it? It's a page-turner, crazy idea-filled(as all sci-fi should be) thrilling, thoughtful, powerful, funny, poignant novel. It is an excellent piece of writing that I would love to see taught in high school classrooms.
My only problems with it are that terrible cover(who designed these covers? They have nothing to do with the story -- not even the tone of the story) and the sometimes indecipherable use of portuguese. But those are both minor.
An excerpt:
"We know you now. That makes all the difference, doesn't it? Even Quim doesn't hate you now. When you really know somebody, you can't hate them." "Or maybe it's just that you can't really know them until you stop hating them." "Is that a circular paradox? Dom Cristao says that most truth can be only expressed in circular paradoxes." "I don't think it has anything to do with truth, Olhado. It's just cause and effect. We can never sort them out. Science refuses to admit any cause except first cause-- knock down one domino, the one next to it also falls. But when it comes to human beings, the only type of cause that matters is final cause, the purpose. What a person had in mind. Once you understand what people really want, you can't hate them anymore. You can fear them, but you can't hate them, because you can always find the same desires in your own heart."
If you'd like to discuss this novel, e-mail me at krischwe@whitman.edu
41 internautes sur 45 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Sequel to Ender's Game requires a different mindset. 6 juin 1997
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
As a teacher, I have insisted that my high school freshmen all read Ender's Game. The fast pace and excellent character development engage the students and lead them toward discussion of serious issues, like how we treat those who are "different" and the ultimate goals and purposes of education. Speaker for the Dead has a different focus, and perhaps a different audience. Although many of my students have read it because they so loved Ender's Game, not many were ready for its sophistication.
Speaker for the Dead works for me in its treatment of two major issues. The first of these, expressed through the interaction (and its disastrous results) between the piggies and the humans, has to do with cultural relationships and the arrogant assumptions often made by the dominant culture. The humans function at a level of cultural blindness hard to understand through most of the novel, and that blindness has tragic consequences.
The second issue I love in this book is the concept of the Speaker for the Dead, the role that Ender Wiggin has taken on in his adulthood. A Speaker's job consists of traveling to places he is called to "speak" the life of someone who has died. These itinerant Speakers come to the person's life completely objectively, and thus they are able to speak the truth about that person--good and bad. The speaker helps the community deal with the person's death by allowing them to see that person completely; all the person's facets, foibles, and fortes are displayed. I found myself thinking that if mopre people read this book, we might have a whole new funereal ritual to deal with.
In short, while of a completely different tone than Ender's Game, Speaker for the Dead brings up some important issues, and it is well worth the time spent in reading it. Invest several days in this book; it deserves them.
--Prudence Plunkett (Prudence_Plunkett@breadnet.middlebury.edu)
39 internautes sur 44 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Different than Ender's Game, but better 25 janvier 1999
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
Speaker for the Dead is not meant for hard core sci-fi readers. They might find it boring, as I did when I first tried reading it as a 12 year old who only wanted to read something like Star Wars.
As I got older, though and I began understanding exactly what Speaker for the Dead was about, it quickly became one of my favorite novels, and now I have to say only Les Miserables beats it on my all-time great novels list.
The novel deals with complex issues such as racism, discrimination, guilt, redemption, compassion, understanding, and the power of truth. Thankfully the book doesn't preach, but it simply show what happens in a clear and straight foreward way, and then it allows the reader to make his or her own conclusions.
Card allows us to understand the conflicting emotions and desires of the characters extremely well, which helps the reader gain interest in the plot and the lives of the characters. I was impressed with how Card was able to develop so many characters so well and deeply, that they felt more like people than characters in a novel. I felt like I understood Ender, Valentine, Ela, Miro, and Novinha. I was also impressed with how much I felt I understood Pipo, Libo, and Marcao, who appear in the book either very shortly or not at all.
The novel forced me to deeply think about my own attitudes about the various themes in the story very closely, and it even inspired me to change the way I thought about many issues the book presents. The alien pequeninos were masterfully devleloped as both an alien race, but also a race that is remarkably human.
The symbolism was obvious, which is how I feel symbolism should be. I don't like playing the deep overdisection of a novel game so many of my former English teachers felt were necessary. Speaker doesn't demand nor inspire that. It simply tells the story in a clear manner, and lets the reader understand what is going on beneath the black and white.
If you like fast paced shoot em up sci-fi space operas, I would not recommend Speaker to you. But if you like a well thought out, well developed novel with rich characterization and a thought provoking story, Speaker for the Dead is a great novel to read. If you don't like sci-fi because the characters are often too flat, and the plot line excessively fast paced, without inspiring any thought on the reader's part, Speaker for the Dead is also highly recommended to you. I have always felt it had much more in common with Les Miz, Great Expectations, Scarlet Letter, and Shakespeare, than traditional science fiction.
But make sure you read Ender's Game first (also a fantastic novel that is more traditional sci-fi, but still very enjoyable to those who don't).
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED--but only if thinking too much doesn't give you a headache.
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