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Static Contraction Training [Format Kindle]

Peter Sisco , John Little

Prix Kindle : EUR 12,17 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

"This is truly an incredible discovery that could cause physiology books to be rewritten." -- Ironman Magazine "A thorough, productive weight workout in less than three minutes? You better believe it! Larger muscles. Stronger techniques. Fewer injuries. What more do you want?" -- Martial Arts Training Magazine From bodybuilding and fitness pioneers Peter Sisco and John R. Little comes this revolutionary guide to building maximum muscle size and strength--using workouts that last as little as two minutes! Based on the authors' groundbreaking new research, Static Contraction Training reveals how a program consisting of only six 15- to 30-second exercises per workout will build muscle size and strength more efficiently than any other method. Learn firsthand the concepts that are revolutionizing bodybuilding, including:

  • Why training more than once a week--or longer than five minutes--can compromise your progress
  • How to stimulate maximum muscle mass
  • Nutritional fact vs. fiction
  • Gaining muscle without fat
  • Your weak link and how to overcome it in your next workout
  • The "law" that guarantees you huge muscle growth Whether you are a weekend athlete, beginning bodybuilder, or champion, the information in this book will forever change the way you view bodybuilding and strength training exercise. Peter Sisco is editor of Ironman Magazine's Ultimate Bodybuilding series and co-author of Power Factor Training and The Golfer's Two-Minute Workout. John R. Little, the innovator of the Static Contraction Method of strength training, is the editor of the Bruce Lee Library Series and co-author of Power Factor Training and The Golfer's Two-Minute Workout.

Book Description

"This is truly an incredible discovery that could cause physiology books to be rewritten." -- Ironman Magazine "A thorough, productive weight workout in less than three minutes? You better believe it! Larger muscles. Stronger techniques. Fewer injuries. What more do you want?" -- Martial Arts Training Magazine From bodybuilding and fitness pioneers Peter Sisco and John R. Little comes this revolutionary guide to building maximum muscle size and strength--using workouts that last as little as two minutes! Based on the authors' groundbreaking new research, Static Contraction Training reveals how a program consisting of only six 15- to 30-second exercises per workout will build muscle size and strength more efficiently than any other method. Learn firsthand the concepts that are revolutionizing bodybuilding, including:
  • Why training more than once a week--or longer than five minutes--can compromise your progress
  • How to stimulate maximum muscle mass
  • Nutritional fact vs. fiction
  • Gaining muscle without fat
  • Your weak link and how to overcome it in your next workout
  • The "law" that guarantees you huge muscle growth Whether you are a weekend athlete, beginning bodybuilder, or champion, the information in this book will forever change the way you view bodybuilding and strength training exercise.
Peter Sisco is editor of Ironman Magazine's Ultimate Bodybuilding series and co-author of Power Factor Training and The Golfer's Two-Minute Workout. John R. Little, the innovator of the Static Contraction Method of strength training, is the editor of the Bruce Lee Library Series and co-author of Power Factor Training and The Golfer's Two-Minute Workout.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 4885 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 176 pages
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Jusqu'à 4 appareils simultanés, selon les limites de l'éditeur
  • Editeur : McGraw-Hill; Édition : 1 (1 janvier 1999)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B003OYJILG
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°208.301 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Amazon.com: 3.5 étoiles sur 5  113 commentaires
153 internautes sur 159 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 This training method doesn't work! 22 janvier 2004
Par David J. Walmsley - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Save yourself time, money and energy and forget about Static Contraction Training (SCT). I followed this method for 8 solid months. Every workout I attempted to lift heavier weights and I did succeed- I did "hold" heavier weights.
Here's a few examples- Seat shoulder press I started with 225lb. and built up to a 370lb. hold. Bench I started at 365lbs. and built up to 465lbs. Close bench 290, up to 385. I was using more than 2200lbs. on the leg press, the machine couldn't hold anymore weight.
I was amazed at the weights I was "holding", and was pleased that I was able to increase almost every workout. I also made sure to get enough rest- I increased my recovery time between workouts up to 1 month, meaning that I had 30 days to recover before doing the same exercises again. The books states that you need to increase recovery times in order to grow stronger.
Then last week I decided to "test" myself. See what I could do using full range dynamic exercise. I thought that for sure I would be able to add 20lbs. to my bench press- I thought that would be very easy to do. WRONG! I was able to bench my normal weight- 200lbs., but it felt a bit heavy. When I tried 220 the bar got half way up and that was it- no way was it going any further. I was stunned! I'm holding 465 and yet I couldn't get 220 up.
After a few days rest I tried a few more full range exercises. I did seated dumbbell presses- I struggled to get 4 reps with 50lb. DB's. I dropped down to 30lb. DB's and 8 reps felt quite challenging (remember that I was statically holding 370lbs.). 80lbs. on the leg extension was heavy for 6 reps (I'm statically holding 380lbs. on that exercise). On dumbbell concentration curls I would use 75lbs. and get 6 reps (prior to SCT), now doing 65lbs. for 6 reps was a challenge.
Before SCT I could do over 100 non-stop pushups and do chinups for 3 sets of 10 with 30lbs. tied to my waist. After 8 months of SCT I struggle to get 40 pushups and can barely do 10 chinups with just my bodyweight.
Forget all the hype about this program, it just doesn't work.
I believed very strongly in this method and based on my static holds I thought it was working wonderfully. But attempting a few full range movements as proved to me that static holds do not transfer over to full range movements.
Now don't think for a moment that I wasn't pushing myself during SCT. I kept looking to increase hold times and/or amount of weight being used. I busted my butt trying to hold more weight. So lack of effort was not the problem.
The method sounds great in theory but falls well short in reality. If you want to "hold" more weight then use SCT. If you want to use your muscles in "motion" then look for some other training method.
67 internautes sur 71 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Nice baby... but with a big tub of bathwater 21 novembre 2000
Par Z. D. Carter - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
The authors argue that a workout consisting of static contractions, wherein you select a weight for a particular exercise that represents the most you can hold in a static position for 10-20 seconds before the weight starts to drop, is the most effective way to build strength, and they offer results of some medical research, and results of their own studies, in favor of their assertion. The arguments and information presented are interesting, but not without fault.

I've tried the static contraction method myself, and have gotten better results with it than anything else I've tried, but since reading this book, I've modified my choice of exercises from what the authors recommend, based on my own experiences and outside readings.

One of the assertions the authors make is that muscle fiber recruitment during contraction, and therefore contraction force, is highest when a muscle is maximally shortened. That much is true, but then the authors go on to confuse force exerted during a movement with force of muscular contraction.

Force exerted at any stage of a lifting effort is a product of contractile force and mechanical advantage, and mechanical advantage can vary greatly throughout the range of an exercise.

Therefore, the authors' recommendation that you hold the weight in the strongest position of a particular movement is in many cases equivalent to recommending that you hold the weight in the position of greatest mechanical advantage.

When stated in this manner, their recommendation sounds silly, and it is.

That it is nonsense can be seen from the fact that in pressing movements (squat, bench, etc) the mechanical advantage of your muscles at the lockout position is infinite. At (or near) the lockout position, the limit of your "strength" is set not by your muscles, but by the ultimate yielding strength of your bones, joints and tendons. I don't know about you, but I do NOT venture into the gym hoping to discover the yielding point of my bones, joints, and tendons... if you follow the authors' recommendations as far as exercise selection to the letter, you will sooner or later experience severe joint and tendon pains, and possibly severe injury.

The authors also assume in their discussions that all else is equal (with the exception of force exerted) throughout the range of a movement, and therefore, nothing is to be gained by working a muscle statically in any position other than the fully contracted position.

In a simple minded model of the body, where a single muscle acts to cause rotation about a single joint or axis, that might be true, but the kinesiology of movement is not that simple. In the real world, with real body movements, various muscles contribute varying percentages to the total muscular effort at different stages of the movement. Thus, when you're performing a bench press, the muscles which you are using when you're at the bottom of the lift pressing the bar off your chest are different and/or are used to a different degree than when you are at the top of the lift. So while it is completely true that increases in static strength correlate very well with increases in dynamic strength for a -particular- muscle in a particular range of the overall movement, this is not necessarily true when one considers a full range movement where different muscles are used at different stages of the movement.

I think this explains why some people who experiment with this program have subsequently discovered that their full range lifting strength has gone -down- even while all indications from their static hold weights were that they were gaining strength much faster than they ever had before.

In summary, I would read this book for the information it contains on static contractions and their effect on strength, the information on workout frequency and training volume, and the nutritional information, but I would ignore the authors' mostly nonsense notions on exercise selection, and their recommendations on which range of a particular movement should be selected when doing a static contraction "rep". The key is to select those exercises which place maximum stress on the -muscle- you want to work (and minimum stress on joints), regardless of how much weight you happen to be able to hold in that position relative to other positions.

If you do that, you can lose the bathwater, but keep the baby.
46 internautes sur 49 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Results 21 mai 2002
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
I normally never express any reviews like this, however I was compelled to give my opinion and experience on the whole Power Factor and Static Contraction Training based on the reviews I read. I was introduced to these training methods by a gentlemen I met in the gym. I helped him with a spot where he was lifting incredibily high weight. He possessed a very muscular & thick physique. He preceeds to tell me about PFT. The biggest points that captured my attention was the fact he has been on the program for over 4 years, only works out 1 time per week and never had an injury despite the high weight. At that moment, I was in mild pain due to my current full range training to my joints and shoulder.
I took the initiative and did my research. Bought the books and looked at the website. Took me over a week to open my mind for many of their concepts shattered what I beleived was true about bodybuilding. I decided to assume they were right and to give the program a try for 10 weeks before I made a judgement.
I am 32 years old and have been lifting weights for over 10 years now. I have tried different programs, attended seminars on bodybuilding and fitness and paid thousands of dollars on different programs. My family was also into bodybuilding and we often compared notes on methods that worked and did not. For the most part, I have a good grasp of what works and what does not for the NATURAL bodybuilder, so I am far from being a beginner in the sport.
I have 3 people currently on the Static Contraction Training program. We are into our 4th week and the results so far are astounding!!! All 3 of our bodies have changed, our strength has increased immensely, plus I no longer have the lingering pain in my joints and shoulders. As a matter of fact, I feel they are getting stronger. I am amazed at the weight I am able to hold thus far (ie. 1000lbs+ on Leg Press, Bench 450lbs+ as an example) and my 2 other test subjects receiving similar results in weight.
My whole point is don't listen to the negative reviews on methods that could profoundly change your body. Judge for yourself and base it on RESULTS. In everything in life there are different ways, blueprints and methods. One author may say one thing is good and another will say it's not despite all their credentials. Who do you beleive? Results never lie. Give it an honest try before you make any judgements. I have followed the program "exactly" prescribed and am thrilled with what I am experiencing so far.
68 internautes sur 75 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Worth trying out if you have the right stuff 2 janvier 2001
Par Anthony - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
This is a workout system involving holding very heavy weights in a stationary position for a few seconds. The system works, but their are a few drawbacks you should consider before purchasing this book. The first is that the book tries to get a little too scientific, and spends a little too much time on things like nutrition etc. I wish they would have jus focused on the workout. The second drawback is that you must have access to a good power rack. If you don't, then it could be dangerous. The last and biggest drawback is that for this system to really work you need to have a strong partner. That is the only way to actually get the heavy weights into postiion, and the only way to get an accurate time. If you don't have a partner or a good power rack then you would be better off skipping this system. One other thing I should mention is that the authors state that gaining strenghth in a static hold would transfer to a full range movement but I found that for myself it did not happen. Overall if you have the necesarry things then you may want to try this and see how it works for you. My own personal opinion however is that you would be better off buying BEYOND BRAWN by Stuart McRobert (the best book on weightlifting.)
64 internautes sur 71 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Incredible Muscle Gains! 5 mars 2000
Par Michael A. Malleo - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
The Static Contraction workout is the best workout that I have ever done. I have gained tremendous results from using the Power Factor system, but even greater results from the Static Contraction System. The book is straight forward and very informative on the results of static training. Static strength does indeed transfer over to full-range strength, which I have found out from my own personal experience. After only 8 weeks on the program I have gained 15 lbs. of solid muscle. I know for a fact that it was muscle because before I began the program I had my body weight and body fat percentage taken. Eight weeks later, after keeping a steady diet (as always) I weighed in 15 lbs more than I did 8 weeks ago, and my body fat percentage was 2%lower. My strength increased, and flexiblity was the same (due to stronger ligaments). For me, lifting weights once a week is all that is needed to increase my size and strength. Static Contraction Training is by far, the best book ever written on body building and strength training.
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