EUR 22,42
  • Tous les prix incluent la TVA.
Il ne reste plus que 7 exemplaire(s) en stock.
Expédié et vendu par Amazon.
Emballage cadeau disponible.
Quantité :1
Amazon rachète votre
article EUR 6,70 en chèque-cadeau.
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 2 images

Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World (Anglais) Relié – 27 mai 2014


Voir les 5 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Relié
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 22,42
EUR 19,42
Broché
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 13,51

Offres spéciales et liens associés


Les clients ayant consulté cet article ont également regardé


Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

"I stayed up all night reading this book. Miodownik writes with such knowledge, such enthusiasm, such a palpable love for his subject." —Oliver Sacks, author of Hallucinations

"Concrete, chocolate, paper, porcelain; this is a fascinating and informative account of the ‘stuff’ of our everyday lives." —Penny Le Couteur, coauthor of Napoleon’s Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History

"It is a rare thing for a true scientist to be able to explain how things work so clearly to the layperson—and even rarer to do so in such an entertaining fashion. No one who reads this book will look at the world quite the same again." —Kate Ascher, author of The Works, The Heights, and The Way to Go

"[A] wonderful account of the materials that have made the modern world…Miodownik writes well enough to make even concrete sparkle." —Financial Times

"A deftly written, immensely enjoyable little book." —Observer (UK)

"[Miodownik] makes even the most everyday seem thrilling." —The Sunday Times (UK)


"Miodownik achieves precisely what he sets out to, which is to make the case that the materials we have made are as extraordinary, and as revealing of us, as the materials we are made of." —The Times (UK)

"Makes even the most everyday seem thrilling" —The Sunday Times (UK)

"A deftly written, immensely enjoyable little book." —Observer (UK)

"Miodownik tells a good story. . . Enthralling." —The Guardian (UK)

"As you read it you begin to see the world around you the way Miodownik does: every piece of ‘stuff’ we take for granted in our daily lives has a rich story to tell: from stinky Roman concrete, exploding pool balls and ceramic dentures to supermaterials like graphene and aerogel. The author’s infectious enthusiasm shines through on every page." —Jim Al-Khalili, Professor of Theoretical Physics at the University of Surrey and author of Quantum: A Guide for the Perplexed


"I stayed up all night reading this book. Miodownik writes with such knowledge, such enthusiasm, such a palpable love for his subject." —Oliver Sacks, author of Hallucinations

"Concrete, chocolate, paper, porcelain; this is a fascinating and informative account of the ‘stuff’ of our everyday lives." —Penny Le Couteur, coauthor of Napoleon’s Buttons: How 17 Molecules Changed History

"It is a rare thing for a true scientist to be able to explain how things work so clearly to the layperson—and even rarer to do so in such an entertaining fashion. No one who reads this book will look at the world quite the same again." —Kate Ascher, author of The Works, The Heights, and The Way to Go

"[A] wonderful account of the materials that have made the modern world…Miodownik writes well enough to make even concrete sparkle." —Financial Times

"A deftly written, immensely enjoyable little book." —Observer (UK)

"[Miodownik] makes even the most everyday seem thrilling." —The Sunday Times (UK) "Miodownik, director of the Institute of Making at University College London, writes a fascinating introduction to materials science, a discipline unfamiliar to most outside it. To “tell the story of stuff” he takes a photo of himself enjoying a cup of tea on his London rooftop, and proceeds to examine 10 of the materials in the photo. These materials (concrete, glass, plastics, etc.) are ubiquitous in the modern world and possess their own chemistry and history. Miodownik includes himself in his discussions so that, in the chapter on biomaterials, readers learn about his fillings as well as his disappointment that when he broke a leg as a child he didn’t receive the same upgrades as the Six Million Dollar Man. His humor helps highlight such facts as we are one of the first generations to not taste our cutlery, due to the properties of stainless steel, or that “the biggest diamond yet discovered... is orbiting a pulsar star” and is “five times the size of Earth.” In his chapter on paper, he describes the book as “a fortress for words,” while he regards chocolate as “one of our greatest engineering creations.” Miodownik’s infectious curiosity and explanatory gifts will inspire readers to take a closer look at the materials around them." —Publishers Weekly, starred reivew

Présentation de l'éditeur

A New York Times Bestseller

An eye-opening adventure deep inside the everyday materials that surround us, packed with surprising stories and fascinating science
Why is glass see-through? What makes elastic stretchy? Why does a paper clip bend? Why does any material look and behave the way it does? These are the sorts of questions that Mark Miodownik is constantly asking himself. A globally-renowned materials scientist, Miodownik has spent his life exploring objects as ordinary as an envelope and as unexpected as concrete cloth, uncovering the fascinating secrets that hold together our physical world.
In Stuff Matters, Miodownik entertainingly examines the materials he encounters in a typical morning, from the steel in his razor and the graphite in his pencil to the foam in his sneakers and the concrete in a nearby skyscraper. He offers a compendium of the most astounding histories and marvelous scientific breakthroughs in the material world, including:

  • The imprisoned alchemist who saved himself from execution by creating the first European porcelain.
  • The hidden gem of the Milky Way, a planet five times the size of Earth, made entirely of diamond.
  • Graphene, the thinnest, strongest, stiffest material in existence—only a single atom thick—that could be used to make entire buildings sensitive to touch.
From the teacup to the jet engine, the silicon chip to the paper clip, the plastic in our appliances to the elastic in our underpants, our lives are overflowing with materials. Full of enthralling tales of the miracles of engineering that permeate our lives, Stuff Matters will make you see stuff in a whole new way.


Vendez cet article - Prix de rachat jusqu'à EUR 6,70
Vendez Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World contre un chèque-cadeau d'une valeur pouvant aller jusqu'à EUR 6,70, que vous pourrez ensuite utiliser sur tout le site Amazon.fr. Les valeurs de rachat peuvent varier (voir les critères d'éligibilité des produits). En savoir plus sur notre programme de reprise Amazon Rachète.

Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre (En savoir plus)
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Index | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 172 commentaires
32 internautes sur 32 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A Look at How Amazing Common Materials Can Be 13 avril 2014
Par Janet Perry - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
Until recently I had never heard the words 'material science.' Sue I knew there were all kinds of amazing things done to make stuff in our lives, stronger, thinner, cheaper, better, and more energy efficient. But, being a child of the 60's I just figured this was 'better living through chemistry."

Boy was I wrong. And how wonderfully Miodownik has opened this world up in this delightful book. By taking ten ordinary materials you see in one picture, he constructs a marvelous world. Each chapter is named for a property of the material, and each begins from a very simple point. Some talk about the history of the material, others about its chemical structure, and others with a story from his life.

Using this as a starting point, he takes you deeper and deeper into this material and what makes it marvelous. For example I had no idea there were 5 or 6 different crystal structures for chocolate and why some of them make better candy than others. The book is full of these delightful bits of information.

Miodownik's style is a wonderful one for the layperson. Although he clearly knows so much more than he's telling you (and no doubt can say it much more technically), you always understand his terms, you don't fell burdened by too many formulas -- he always brings the discussion back to stuff we understand: paper money, movies, tea cups, stainless steel forks. What I love best is how his absolute delight in the materials of this world -- stuff -- comes through.

One very tiny warning:. Miodownik is British and uses British terms. Most of the time this isn't a problem, you'll know what he means, but once it tripped me up. In his chapter on foam, he talks about "jelly." To an American this is the stuff in jars that you spread on toast. He is not talking about that. He is talking about set gelatins, what in the US we call by the brand name Jell-o. If you figure this out, that chapter makes perfect sense. Thinking jelly as spreadable fruit juice makes the chapter very strange indeed.

It's a book that is at once an easily accessible introduction to materials science and an absolutely delightful personal set of reflections.
45 internautes sur 48 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Science Made Enjoyable 4 mai 2014
Par L. M Young - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
I loved this book.

I'd never heard about "material science" when I went to school, but biology left me cold, chemistry was absorbing in the laboratory, but the mathematical portion of the course was over my head. Needless to say, after that, physics was out. :-) But earth science I loved, and I would have loved a course on material science, especially if Mark Miodownik was the teacher. I found myself smiling as I read the science behind the everyday things in our lives: concrete, steel, paper, glass—even chocolate—and the most enjoyable part was that his prose was illuminating and the scientific concepts were clearly explained. Instead of being puzzled by the concepts, I found them completely understandable. Perhaps, for people who are more science-oriented it might have been simplistic, but I found it fascinating, especially the chapter about the silica aerogel.

Miodownik has an easygoing writing style that I really enjoyed, reminding me of Bill Bryson and James Burke. My only problem with this book is that I wish it could have been twice as long! I'll be looking forward to his next book, especially if concerning the same subject.
20 internautes sur 20 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A charming ability that makes it difficult to look at these materials - glass, concrete, steel and plastic - the same way again 15 mai 2014
Par Jared Castle - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
We have two sons who are currently studying in the fourth- and fifth grades. They are sponges, absolutely ripe for music, math, language and science, especially when it is delivered in as entertaining a form as Mark Miodownik's Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World.

I picked up the book for myself, having just finished a couple rather dour non-fiction books on politics and race relations. Miodownik's enthusiasm for his subject and his cheery writing style captured my attention from the first chapter.

His book is a fascinating read delivered in a conversational style that makes it easy to share with my 11-year old and 10-year old sons. That's a rare treat in this medium, whereas we often share science documentaries on the Discovery Channel or PBS. I'm looking forward to having my sons share the book next with their grandfather next.

The book has a charming ability that makes it difficult to look at these materials - glass, concrete, steel and plastic - the same way again.

Rating: Five stars

On a related note, I've recently reviewed two illustrated books from DK Publishing that are for the young adult audience. I recommend both History Year by Year and Firearms: An Illustrated History and would love to see a similar treatment applied to Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials That Shape Our Man-Made World.

Both of the DK Publishing books are filled with full-color photos and graphics; and large enough to cover a kid's lap. "Firearms: An Illustrated History" is 12 x 10.3 x 1.2 inches and "History Year by Year" is 10.9 x 8.8 x 1 inches.

Miodownik's essay on metal, specifically stainless steel, would make a fantastic illustration.
19 internautes sur 21 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
"The material world is not just a display of our technology and culture; it is part of us." 6 avril 2014
Par E. Bukowsky - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
In 1985, a stranger stabbed a schoolboy named Mark Miodownik in the back with a razor blade, inflicting a stab wound measuring thirteen centimeters. What the victim took away from this experience, besides the pain and an unsightly scar, was a feeling of awe that such a small weapon, "not much bigger than a postage stamp," could penetrate five layers of clothing. "The birth of my obsession with materials," Miodownik states, began that day. Mark started to ask questions about what makes substances behave the way they do and he has never stopped looking for answers. He studied at Oxford, became an engineer, and is now a professor of materials science at University College London.

In his fact-filled and entertaining book, "Stuff Matters," Miodownik tells us about the history, composition, and benefits of specific materials, some of which are commonly used but not fully understood by the average individual. Miodownik provides intriguing information that will propel readers to look at a drinking glass, stainless steel spoon, chocolate bar, book, plastic bag, concrete building, diamond ring, and even a pencil with new eyes. From the Stone Age to the present, materials have defined periods of human existence. During the Victorian era, steel was king. Silicon defined the twentieth century and helped create the information revolution that makes our high-tech lives possible. Miodownik also discusses how we interact with materials at a physical and emotional level. Are the things that we build, ingest, and wear merely practical or do they appeal to one or more of our five senses? Medically, we rely on materials more than ever before. Anyone who has recently had a hip replacement, undergone reconstructive plastic surgery, or been fitted with a prosthetic body part has profited from the amazing substances and procedures developed by creative and highly skilled scientists and physicians.

Miodownik's style is accessible, informal, and humorous; his curiosity and enthusiasm are infectious. He includes his own drawings, lending the narrative a more personal touch. Non-scientists may not grasp the passages dealing with atoms, electrons, carbon bonds, and quantum mechanics; nor will they necessarily comprehend why substances behave differently, depending on their composition, age, as well as their exposure to light, pressure, and high or low temperatures. Still, even people who flunked physics and chemistry will realize that some of the things we take for granted are truly incredible. Professor Miodownik urges us to appreciate the beauty, diversity, utility, and sophistication of the materials that make our world a more hospitable and habitable place. In addition, he introduces us to such exotic items as astrogel and graphene, each of which possesses unique properties. Let us hope that researchers' efforts and ingenuity will be devoted not just to making our everyday lives more enjoyable and convenient, but also to preserving our planet for future generations.
13 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Good, but could have been better 24 juillet 2014
Par William Marut - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Overall, an enjoyable read. Some detractors: [(1) The sketches and photographs are of low quality. For example, there is a really bad sketch of an atom on page 149. Also, many of the pictures in the book are unnecessary. For example, in the chapter on paper, there are pictures of a letter, photographic paper, books, receipts, envelopes, paper bags, glossy magazines, tickets, money, and newspapers. (2) The last chapter should have been the first chapter. The author spends the first 10 chapters on steel, paper, concrete, chocolate, foam, plastic, glass, graphite, porcelain, and body implants. Then he spends the last chapter giving a high level view of materials science. Perhaps the author felt that the Introduction (before chapter 1) was enough of a foundation. (3) There are some serious distractions in the book, such as the 26-page screenplay in the chapter on plastic, which struck me as a tedious way to cover the subject. I ended up just skimming it. (4) The book goes back and forth between being folksy / anecdotal and being scientific. Personally, I would have been quite happy with a little less information on the author's personal life, and a little more information (and sketches) on quantum mechanics, atoms, and molecules.] All-in-all, an interesting and informative book, and I recommend reading it, but . . .
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?