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Thank Your Wicked Parents: Blesings from a Difficult Childhood (Anglais) Relié – 15 juin 2012


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Book by Richard Bach


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Amazon.com: 21 commentaires
13 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Far from Being Richard Bach's Best Book 16 juillet 2012
Par Ernie Zelinski - The Prosperity Guy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Since I am a big fan of Richard Bach, I ordered "Thank Your Wicked Parents". This book is not even close to having the quality, the depth, and the insight that Bach's "Johnathan Livingston Seagull, "Illusions", and "Bridge Across Forever" have.

So why am I not that blown away with "Thank Your Wicked Parents" like I have been with Bach's other books? The problem with this book is that it gives one little item of thanks on each page. Here are three of them:

Thank you for lying to me, so that I can find my truth for myself.
Thank you showing me chaos, that I value order.
Thank you for shouting at me, so that I'm soft spoken today.

Near as I can tell, there are around 100 of these items of gratitude for having wicked parents throughout the book. After reading twenty or so, these all begin to sound the same (to me, anyway). I have to admit that this book may resonate with certain people and make a big impact on their lives if they have been hating their parents for years. I suppose even one of these items of gratitude can impact a person. I think, however, that some people are going to be disappointed with "Thank Your Wicked Parents."

If you would like a small great gift book by Richard Bach, and if you still haven't read it, then buy Messiah's Handbook: Reminders for the Advanced Soul instead. This book has a lot more material and a lot more depth to it. You won't be disappointed with "Messiah's Handbook."

Ernie Zelinski
Author of The Joy of Not Working: A Book for the Retired, Unemployed and Overworked- 21st Century Edition
(Over 250,000 copies sold)
and Look Ma, Life's Easy: An Inspirational Novel about How Ordinary People Attain Extraordinary Success and Remarkable Prosperity
12 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Since it didn't kill you, it can make you stronger... 18 juin 2012
Par Liz - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I showed this book to my therapist after our session today. At first she said, "This is terrible!" Then, as she kept reading, she understood what it was really saying. She changed her tune and said, "I LOVE it!"

It IS shocking to consider that life's worst tragedies can become your biggest blessings. How does this alchemy work?

In this book, Richard Bach, (author of Jonathan Livingston Seagull) offers dozens of prayers for those of us healing from difficult childhood experiences. He holds that we decide what an experience means to us. We have this power and it's never too late to use it.

I heartily recommend this book for anyone who is ready to step out of the role of victim.
11 internautes sur 14 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Not Ready For Spiritual Prime Time 19 mai 2013
Par Zoeeagleeye - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Let me state at the outset that I've read ALL of Richard Bach's books, some more than once. I have a huge respect for the man, but in late years the quality of his writing and thinking have gone downhill.

This is a little book with just a one-sentence "thank you" prayer on every page. Scattered throughout are pictures of sad children. From a very high spiritual perspective you could say the book was dead-on right, but by the time you got to that very high spiritual perspective you would no longer care about thank you's and lessons of that nature since you would have healed them all.

I only got to the second prayer which was, "Thank you for discounting my pain so that I could learn to let it go" when I heard myself thinking, "That's sick." I stopped. I examined further. And I realized that life, especially when one is trying to cope with, understand, heal and love one's psychological/spiritual dynamic, just doesn't work that way.

Before you can let any pain go, you must first know you have it, then feel it, understand at least some of the family dynamics that put it in you in the first place, forgive those involved, forgive yourself for carrying it on long after you left home, and finally realize what it did for you in a positive sense so you can thank those involved and ONLY THEN can you let it go.

Most children (and I should know as I am one of them) who have had their pain, or feelings, or talents, or intelligence, or affections discounted by a parent do not grow up to learn that particular lesson from that particular situation. When you are discounted it means you do not matter, you are not worthy, not deserving, not important in any sense. When you are discounted a part of you is rubbed off the face of the Earth. You do not, Spock-like, think logically about it and "decide" you will use your mind to simply let it go. Psychologists call that "repression," among other possibilities. Essentially, you will internalize it and then go through life projecting it onto others until you get to a certain age, oh maybe 40, if you're lucky, and hear yourself telling someone that your husband or wife discounts your (fill in the blank). Bach seems to have missed the point that it is YOU who are continuing to abuse yourself in this way, it is YOU who are discounting your feelings, say, and this is being reflected back to you in the behavior of those around you. Stop discounting your feelings and watch others cease doing it to you. That's how it works.

I read most of the rest of the book. Here's one more: "Thank you for calling me freak, so I could know my differences are my gifts." The truth is that child is more likely to commit suicide or end up addicted or harming others before he or she will ever find the strength of heart and breadth of soul to realize their differences are their gifts. It breaks your heart -- and after 50 or so of these "prayers" you want to smash the book down as it appears to be trivializing what many childhoods are like, especially when you look at all the sad and pensive pictures of these innocents. Our world presently does not much notice the pain of children. I'm thinking of that line from the "Salesman" play, "Respect must be paid!" The suffering one endures as children MUST BE RECOGNIZED AND HONORED. It cannot just be rushed off the stage of one's life by a positive affirmation.

I think Bach had good intentions with this book, but he didn't put all the pieces together before he slapped all these prayers down on paper. Perhaps it would have worked had he taken a "If . . . gift" approach, such as, "If you were called a freak as a child, the gift from that is to know your differences are gifts." This would be a beginning, allowing the child or reader to ask themselves "how it could be so." He could have called the book, "Gifts of a Miserable Childhood."

Bach has always had a tendency to write a little too simple. Most of the time we've been able to fill in the blanks eventually. This time it doesn't work.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Oddball 22 août 2013
Par Mark Schaeffer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Initially I figured the title was inspired by Chris Buckley's satire "Thank You for Smoking." Then I found out it was serious.

A much better author for those looking to work childhood issues is Alice Miller.
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
An awesome little book 7 août 2013
Par G. M. Walton - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
I have no way of knowing whether or not Richard Bach had a difficult childhood and youth but I am betting he did. I did--not nearly as bad as many endured but enough to leave scars, both inside and out. This book is a great affirmation that we are all personally responsible for our lives and the directions we take regardless of what may have gone on in our formative years. We can make lemonade or we can sit down and bawl and whine. It's up to each person. It is a total cop-out to claim abuse, unloving parents, and so on as a reason and excuse for all the rotten, illegal, immoral or nasty things we do as adults. You can break that pattern yourself but it takes some guts and determination. If you feel burdened by a rough past, read this precious tiny book and learn from it!
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