The $100 Startup: Fire Your Boss, Do What You Love and Wo... et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus
  • Tous les prix incluent la TVA.
Il ne reste plus que 2 exemplaire(s) en stock (d'autres exemplaires sont en cours d'acheminement).
Expédié et vendu par Amazon.
Emballage cadeau disponible.
Quantité :1
The $100 Startup: Reinven... a été ajouté à votre Panier
+ EUR 2,99 (livraison)
D'occasion: Bon | Détails
État: D'occasion: Bon
Commentaire: Book ships from USA, takes 4-14 days for delivery. Very good copy, minimal signs of use. We ship all orders daily, M-F, and have a superior Customer Service team. Buy with confidence!
Amazon rachète votre
article EUR 2,00 en chèque-cadeau.
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 2 images

The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future (Anglais) Relié – 8 mai 2012


Voir les 4 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
Relié
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 22,22
EUR 14,05 EUR 12,89

Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Chapter 1 • Renaissance

You already have the skills you need—you just have to know where to look.

“The need for change bulldozed a road down the center of my mind.”

—maya angelou

On the Monday morning of May 4, 2009, Michael Hanna put on a Nordstrom suit with a colorful tie and headed to his office building in downtown Portland, Oregon. A twenty-five-year veteran sales professional, Michael spent his days attending meetings, pitching clients, and constantly responding to email.

Arriving at work, he settled into his cubicle, reading the news and checking a few emails. One of the messages was from his boss, asking to see him later that day. The morning passed uneventfully: more emails, phone calls, and planning for a big pitch. Michael took a client out to lunch, stopping off for an espresso recharge on the way back in. He returned in time to fire off a few more replies and head to the boss’s office.

Inside the office, Michael took a seat and noticed that his boss didn’t make eye contact. “After that,” he says, “everything happened in slow motion. I had heard story after story of this experience from other people, but I was always disconnected from it. I never thought it could happen to me.”

His boss mentioned the downturn in the economy, the unavoidable need to lose good people, and so on. An H.R. manager appeared out of nowhere, walking Michael to his desk and handing him a cardboard box—an actual box!—to pack up his things. Michael wasn’t sure what to say, but he tried to put on a brave face for his nearby colleagues. He drove home at two-thirty, thinking about how to tell his wife, Mary Ruth, and their two children that he no longer had a job.

After the shock wore off, Michael settled into an unfamiliar routine, collecting unemployment checks and hunting for job leads. The search was tough. He was highly qualified, but so were plenty of other people out pounding the pavement every day. The industry was changing, and it was far from certain that Michael could return to a well-paying job at the same level he had worked before.

One day, a friend who owned a furniture store mentioned that he had a truckload of closeout mattresses and no use for them. “You could probably sell these things one at a time on Craigslist and do pretty well,” he told Michael. The idea sounded crazy, but nothing was happening on the job front. Michael figured if nothing else, he could at least sell the mattresses at cost. He called Mary Ruth: “Honey, it’s a long story, but is it OK if I buy a bunch of mattresses?”

The next step was to find a location to stash the goods. Hunting around the city, Michael found a car dealership that had gone out of business recently. Times were hard in the real estate business too, so when Michael called the landlord to see if he could set up shop inside the old showroom, he had a deal. The first inventory went quickly through Craigslist and word of mouth, and the biggest problem was answering questions from potential customers about what kind of mattress they should buy. “I had no business plan and no knowledge of mattresses,” Michael said. “My impression of mattress stores was that they were seedy, high-pressure places. I wasn’t sure what kind of place I was trying to build, but I knew it had to be a welcoming environment where customers weren’t hassled.”

After the first experience went well, Michael took the plunge and studied up on mattresses, talking to local suppliers and negotiating with the landlord to remain in the former car showroom. Mary Ruth built a website. The concept of a no-hard-sell mattress store went over well in Portland, and business grew when the store offered the industry’s first-ever mattress delivery by bicycle. (A friend built a custom tandem bike with a platform on the back that could hold a king-size mattress.) Customers who rode their own bikes to the store received free delivery, a pricing tactic that inspired loyalty and a number of fan videos uploaded to YouTube.

It wasn’t what Michael had ever expected to do, but he had built a real business, profitable right from the first truckload of mattresses and providing enough money to support his family. On the two-year anniversary of his abrupt departure from corporate life, Michael was looking through his closet when he spotted the Nordstrom suit he had worn on his last day. Over the last two years, he hadn’t worn it—or any other professional dress clothes—a single time. He carried the suit out to his bike, dropped it off at Goodwill, and continued on to the mattress store. “It’s been an amazing two years since I lost my job,” he says now. “I went from corporate guy to mattress deliveryman, and I’ve never been happier.”

Across town from Michael’s accidental mattress shop, first-time entrepreneur Sarah Young was opening a yarn store around the same time. When asked why she took the plunge at the height of the economic downturn and with no experience running a business, Sarah said: “It’s not that I had no experience; I just had a different kind of experience. I wasn’t an entrepreneur before, but I was a shopper. I knew what I wanted, and it didn’t exist, so I built it.” Sarah’s yarn store, profiled further in Chapter 11, was profitable within six months and has inspired an international following.

Meanwhile, elsewhere around the world, others were skipping the part about having an actual storefront, opening Internet-based businesses at almost zero startup cost. In England, Susannah Conway started teaching photography classes for fun and got the surprise of her life when she made more money than she did as a journalist. (Question: “What did you not foresee when starting up?” Answer: “I didn’t know I was starting up!”)

Benny Lewis graduated from a university in Ireland with an engineering degree, but never put it to use. Instead he found a way to make a living as a “professional language hacker,” traveling the world and helping students quickly learn to speak other languages. (Question: “Is there anything else we should know about your business?” Answer: “Yes. Stop calling it a business! I’m having the time of my life.”)

Welcome to the strange new world of micro-entrepreneurship. In this world, operating independently from much of the other business news you hear about, Indian bloggers make $200,000 a year. Roaming, independent publishers operate from Buenos Aires and Bangkok. Product launches from one-man or one-woman businesses bring in $100,000 in a single day, causing nervous bank managers to shut down the accounts because they don’t understand what’s happening.

Oddly, many of these unusual businesses thrive by giving things away, recruiting a legion of fans and followers who support their paid work whenever it is finally offered. “My marketing plan is strategic giving,” said Megan Hunt, who makes hand-crafted dresses and wedding accessories in Omaha, Nebraska, shipping them all over the world. “Empowering others is our greatest marketing effort,” said Scott Meyer from South Dakota. “We host training sessions, give away free materials, and answer any question someone emails to us at no charge whatsoever.”

In some ways, renegade entrepreneurs who buck the system and go it alone are nothing new. Microbusinesses—businesses typically run by only one person—have been around since the beginning of commerce. Merchants roamed the streets of ancient Athens and Rome, hawking their wares. In many parts of rural Africa and Asia, much commerce still takes place through small transactions and barter.

Unconventional approaches to marketing and public relations have also been around for a while. Long before it was common, a band had an idea for communicating directly with fans, bypassing the traditional structure of record labels as much as possible. The fans felt like they were part of a community instead of just a crowd of adoring listeners. Oh, and instead of relying primarily on album sales for income, the band would rely on ticket sales and merchandising at an unending series of live concerts. The example sounds like it’s happening today, but the year was 1967, and the band was the Grateful Dead.

What’s new, however, is how quickly someone can start a business and reach a group of customers. The building process is much faster and cheaper today than it has ever been. Going from idea to startup can now take less than a month and cost less than $100—just ask any of the people whose stories you’ll read in this book. Commerce may have been around forever, but scale, reach, and connection have changed dramatically. The handyman who does odd jobs and repairs used to put up flyers at the grocery store; now he advertises through Google to people searching for “kitchen cabinet installation” in their city.

It’s not an elitist club; it’s a middle-class, leaderless movement. All around the world, ordinary people are opting out of traditional employment and making their own way. Instead of fighting the system, they’re creating their own form of work—usually without much training, and almost always without much money. These unexpected entrepreneurs have turned their passion into profit while creating a more meaningful life for themselves.

What if you could do this too? What if you could have the same freedom to set your own schedule and determine your own priorities? Good news: Freedom is possible. More good news: Freedom isn’t something to be envisioned in the vaguely distant future—the future is now.

The $100 Startup Model

I’ve been hearing stories about unconventional businesses for at least a decade, even as I’ve been operating a series of them myself. Through my work as a writer and entrepreneur, I had access to a wide circle of microbusiness case studies: profitable businesses typically run solely by one person without much in the way of startup capital. In preparing for a comprehensive study, I began by checking with many of my friends and colleagues, but I didn’t stop there.

In 2010 I produced a series of workshops on low-budget business ideas with Pamela Slim, author of Escape from Cubicle Nation. The first time we announced a workshop, it sold out in ninety minutes. We then offered spots in another workshop that wouldn’t be held for several months, and it sold out before lunchtime. Since it was clear we had found a demand for this information, I dug deeper.

While hosting the workshops, I became interested in the “follow-your-passion” model—the idea that successful small businesses are often built on the pursuit of a personal hobby or interest. I conducted interviews with entrepreneurs all over the world and documented their stories for an online course called the Empire Building Kit. The course was the inspiration for launching the project on a wider scale and then for writing this book.

I had a number of case studies in mind at the outset, but in preparation for writing the book, I cast the net much wider. I drew respondents from online and offline, collecting data through a Google form that grew to thousands of data points. As I traveled to sixty-three cities in North America on a book tour, I kept meeting and hearing about more unconventional, accidental entrepreneurs.

When I finally closed the nomination process, I had more than 1,500 respondents to choose from. All of the respondents met at least four of the following six criteria:

• “Follow-your-passion” model. Many people are interested in building a business that is based on a hobby or activity they are especially enthusiastic about. As we’ll see, not every passion leads to big bank deposits, but some certainly do.

• Low startup cost. I was interested in businesses that required less than $1,000 in startup capital, especially those which cost almost nothing (less than $100) to begin.

• At least $50,000 a year in net income. I wanted profitable businesses that earned at least as much as the average North American income. As we go along, you’ll notice that the range varies considerably, with many businesses earning healthy six-figure incomes or higher, but a baseline profitability level of at least $50,000 a year was required.

• No special skills. Since we were looking at ordinary people who created a successful business, I had a bias toward businesses that anyone can operate. This point can be hard to define, but there’s a key distinction: Many businesses require specialized skills of some kind, but they are skills that can be acquired through a short period of training or independent study. You could learn to be a coffee roaster on the job, for example, but hopefully not a dentist.

• Full financial disclosure. Respondents for the study agreed to disclose their income projection for the current year and actual income for at least the previous two years. Furthermore, they had to be willing to discuss income and expenses in specific terms.

• Fewer than five employees. For the most part, I was interested in unexpected or accidental entrepreneurs who deliberately chose to remain small. Many of the case studies are from businesses operated strictly by one person, which closely relates to the goal of personal freedom that so many respondents identified.

I excluded businesses that were in “adult” or quasi-legal markets, and in most cases also excluded businesses that were highly technical or required special skills to operate. The baseline test was, “Could you explain what you do to your grandmother, and would you be willing to?”

Next, I wanted to look at businesses started by people all over the world. About half of our stories come from the United States, and half come from the rest of the world. From Silicon Valley to Atlanta, the U.S. is a hub for entrepreneurship, both in terms of values and ease of startup. But as we’ll see, people from all over the world are creating their own microbusinesses, sometimes following the U.S. model and other times doing it independently.

Finally, in making the last selections for the studies presented here, I had a bias toward “interesting” stories. Not every business needs to be sexy or trendworthy—in fact, many of the ones here aren’t—but I liked stories that highlighted originality and creativity. Two years ago in Minneapolis, Lisa Sellman attracted my attention by telling me about her dog care business. At first, I didn’t think much of it. How profitable could a dog care business be? But then Lisa told me how much money she made: $88,000 the previous year and on track to clear six figures the next. All of a sudden I was interested. How did Lisa do it?.?.?.?and what lessons could we learn from her?

Revue de presse

"The $100 Startup is a twofer: It's a kick in the pants to get started on your dream and a road map for finding your way once you begin. If you're not ready to launch your own business after reading this book, you need to go back and read it again!"
-- Daniel H. Pink, New York Times bestselling author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

 
"In this valuable guide Chris Guillebeau shows that transforming an idea into a successful business can be easier than you think…You are in charge of which ideas deserve your time, and this book can help you wake up every morning eager to progress to the next step."
--Tony Hsieh, New York Times bestselling author of Delivering Happiness and CEO
of Zappos.com
 
"The money you have is enough. Chris makes it crystal clear: there are no excuses left.  START.  Start now, not later.  Hurry."
--Seth Godin, New York Times bestselling author of The Bootstrapper’s Bible
 
"Everything Chris Guillebeau does is in earnest. The ideas inside this book will lead you to a better place." 
- -Chris Brogan, President of Human Business Works and author of Trust Agents
 
“With traditional career doors slamming shut, it’s easy to panic, but Chris Guillebeau sees opportunities everywhere. Making a career out of your passion sounds like a dream, but in this straight-forward, engaging book he shows you how to get it done, one simple step at a time.”
--Alan Paul, author of Big in China
 
"Delivers exactly what a new entrepreneur needs: road-tested, effective and exceptionally pragmatic advice for starting a new business on a shoestring.”
--Pamela Slim, author of Escape from Cubicle Nation: From Corporate Prisoner to Thriving Entrepreneur
 
“Guillebeau has been in the trenches for years, and in The $100 Startup he guides you step-by-step through how he and dozens of others have turned their passions into profits. It's essential reading for the solopreneur!
--Todd Henry, author of The Accidental Creative
 
"This book is more than a "how to" guide, it's a "how they did it" guide that should persuade anyone thinking about starting a business that they don't need a fortune to make one."
--John Jantsch, author of Duct Tape Marketing and The Referral Engine

“Crammed with data, checklists, models, and concrete examples.  Thoughtful, funny, and compulsively readable, this guide shows how ordinary people can build solid livings, with independence and purpose, on their own terms.”
--Gretchen Rubin, author of the #1 New York Times bestseller The Happiness Project


Vendez cet article - Prix de rachat jusqu'à EUR 2,00
Vendez The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future contre un chèque-cadeau d'une valeur pouvant aller jusqu'à EUR 2,00, que vous pourrez ensuite utiliser sur tout le site Amazon.fr. Les valeurs de rachat peuvent varier (voir les critères d'éligibilité des produits). En savoir plus sur notre programme de reprise Amazon Rachète.

Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 304 pages
  • Editeur : Crown Business (8 mai 2012)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0307951529
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307951526
  • Dimensions du produit: 14,6 x 2,6 x 21,6 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (2 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 10.032 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre (En savoir plus)
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Index
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

4.0 étoiles sur 5
5 étoiles
0
4 étoiles
2
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
Voir les deux commentaires client
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Commentaires client les plus utiles

1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Zyx le 26 janvier 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Full of short but interesting case studies of people who have started their own small businesses (some 1-person, some niche, some part-time, some on-line, etc).

Provides some ideas for low level, low cost networking/marketing aspects.

Very worthwhile reading if you are wondering if/how to start something small yourself.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Par Romain le 1 avril 2014
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
One of the few books of its kind that I read more than once.

The good parts:

- clear methodology : the author chose to interview creators of businesses that require low start-up capital, no special skills (advanced training), and earn at least a middle-class income.
- well written, an easy and quick read
- meaty. Of course it does not give a recipe for success, but much of the advice is sound and actionable, if not revolutionary.

Cons:

- too much reader-oriented sales pitch, i.e. "you can live the dream"... too bad because it sometimes reads like one of those corny self-help books, which it definitely is not.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1.009 commentaires
524 internautes sur 552 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Less Examples, More Detail 16 mai 2012
Par A. Osborne - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
This is an inspiring book. At least a couple times while reading it I took a pen to jot down some ideas.

My problem with the book is that there are too many success stories but no real detail on the struggle for that success. I think this book would have been more successful if the author had chosen one or two examples per chapter to really dig into. I agree with one reviewer who said that most of the examples are in the form "got an idea, started a website, made money". How did they do it all? That what I like to know. It's great to know that people have started businesses with so little capital but I want to know the struggles, the low points and how they persevered.

Toward the end of the book I just skimmed. I wanted someone to cheer for and I didn't find that in 1/2 page examples.
471 internautes sur 507 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Top selling book on entrepreneurship? 9 août 2012
Par Amer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Well I am disappointed in this book. As a top selling book, I was expecting perhaps too much.

First I would say the target audience of this book are probably those people who never ever read any other book on business, or never even thought about starting a business. Almost every advice is very basic.

When I read author had interviewed so many businesses, I was hoping he would have included more "technical" details about them. For example, the photographer in Spain, how she was advertised, how much she invested in her gear, did she take any classes, how she hires assistants, if any etc. Or coffee shop guy, how did he get money for coffee shop, how many hours he works at coffee shop, how did he gain experience for running it etc (I am pretty sure starting a coffee shop is not exactly $100 startup).

Or that single mom who became marketing consultant, exactly how did she land her first client? How did she dress, and gained their respect? How did she learn about marketing? How did she convince companies that she was a real deal not a joke? (At our company, we had experiences with so-called Social Media Marketing experts. It seems most of them just know how to update their Facebook statuses or send a twitter update.)

For good parts, the book is easy to read. It will inspire many people to do what they enjoy. It does provide a starting point. It repeats general knowledge but it is good to have all that knowledge in one place.

In the end, don't expect anything revolutionary from this book. In my opinion, if you are already inspired to do your own thing then try to find a book on that thing. If you want to start a photography business then you might be better served by a book on starting photography business than this book.
155 internautes sur 164 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Not worth buying, but maybe borrowing 15 octobre 2012
Par Chillin' Out - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I wasn't impressed with this book and am surprised at how many excellent reviews it gets. It had some helpful content and a some useful ideas, but for the most part it was advice you could easily find for free on the internet and much of it was a rehash of stuff you'd find in tons of other books already on the market. A lot of the stories just sounded like good luck stories more than something people could easily reproduce for themselves and some of them sounded downright unbelieveable. My biggest issue with the book though is some of the shady advice given. The three things that bothered me the most:

-The author shared a story of two people who didn't have startup money and couldn't get a bank loan, so they got a fake car loan for their startup. Of course he had an endnote at the end of the chapter that it isn't recommended to do that, but that kind of thing shouldn't even be in the book as a suggestion. He gave it as an idea in the chapter but then to cover his butt legally said he doesn't recommend it in the footnote.
-The author shared a story and the suggestion that you could sell something before you even have a product and then come up with the product after the fact and if people don't want to wait then you can just refund them their money. The example he gave was someone who developed a written program/product and sold it and then once a few people bought it, he contacted them and (lied) said that he was developing a newer, improved program and if they were willing to wait a month or so then they would get the new program at no extra cost and if they didn't want to wait then they would get a refund. I totally get the idea behind something like the kickstarter program, but at least in that instance people know they are funding an idea, but the suggestion in the book was totally different and totally shady.
-The author said you can create (fake) tiers for a product and charge different amounts for the same exact product. This isn't as bad as the other two things I listed above, because really if someone is silly enough to pay more money for the exact same product in a shinier package then that's their foolishness, but it's still a pretty shady idea.

Yep, I've used the term shady quite a few times in this review, but quite a bit of the book came across as if it was written by a stereotypical used-car salesman. I'm sure with all the glowing reviews this book gets that the author must be a decent guy, but if there is an edit of his book in the future, he should seriously consider taking out some of his very shady advice because it made him and his book come across to me in totally the wrong way and once I read the fake car loan idea it was hard to take anything he said seriously after that.
65 internautes sur 68 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Not a Lot of Substance 8 juin 2012
Par Triangle123 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
I was disappointed. The book came across to me as a variation on Four Hour Work Week, where the focus is narrowed to low start-up cost and all the useful, actionable tips are sucked out. There is less substance here than in Four Hour Work Week. If you are completely new to thinking about entrepreneurship (e.g. if you haven't read any business books before), then it may be useful to you. And many of the concepts in the book are told through the eyes of an internet marketer, which was a turn-off to me.

Rather than real substance, the book is sprinkled with filler and vapid thoughts (e.g. from page 247: "Sometimes the best advice is none at all. If you know what you need to do, the next step is simply to do it").

If you need a pep talk to get you started, you may find the book useful. However, the price of the book is more than 10% of a $100 startup. My suggestion is to save that money and put it toward your startup.
64 internautes sur 69 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
All Over the place with an excess of general examples 20 mars 2013
Par SilverStar - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I checked this book out from the library before purchasing and I was very relieved I did not buy it. This book gives endless examples, however it does not inform you of the process before saying things like "and now Kyle makes $90,000 a year." He simply jumps to that part tells you what the person does and how much money they make. I notice the examples were usually followed by the person getting fired or laid off and then the person went on some extravagant vacation where they decided that they were going to start up this random business. They suddenly update their websites and magic they make thousands that same day! There is so much more that happens before this but he only informs the reader of when they were fired and that they went on some vacation and voila they now make an awesome living. I stopped reading some chapters and fast forwarded only to find the same thing over and over. I'm sorry but how did these people have money to travel the world and then decide what their passion was. They must of had a rich parent or something to support them. Whenever you already have money it is easy to take that risk than when you give up everything you have worked so hard for to make your dream happen. I really wanted to see helpful information of the process, the legalities, and how they upkeep that success. This book offers none of that and I may have missed something but it is not informative at all. I would say if anything it could be a motivation type book offering you a great deal of examples of the happiness of others. As far as this being a helpful book for someone who wants to start their own business, that it is not.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?