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The Age of Innocence (Anglais) Broché – 21 janvier 1998


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Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 240 pages
  • Editeur : Dover Publications Inc.; Édition : New edition (21 janvier 1998)
  • Collection : Dover Thrift Editions
  • Langue : Français
  • ISBN-10: 0486298035
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486298030
  • Dimensions du produit: 20,9 x 13,1 x 1,5 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (3 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 118.889 en Livres (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres)
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14 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Jason Tramaine on 24 décembre 2007
Format: Broché
So far I have read Edith Wharton's books of Summer, Ethan Frome and The Age of Innocence. I am in with love her unique writing style. Most time can't put my feelings aside while reading her novels, particularly The Age of Innocence. Edith Wharton has a talent in revealing characters' forbidden love, hidden emotions and internal struggles. I would say she is very good at orchestrating her stories like the melancholy melody. The Age of Innocence is a story of social reality and restrictions. Edith Wharton artfully presented her work as a masterpiece of American classic literature!! I'd also recommend reading Tino Georgiou's bestselling novel--The Fates--if you haven't yet!
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Bunny on 9 novembre 2012
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Soucieux du qu'en dira-t-on, les personnages, serrés dans leurs corsets de bienséance, n'osent pas agir. Ils étouffent dans un monde où chaque geste est épié et commenté. Depuis le début du roman, le personnage principal, jeune homme marié à une riche héretière New Yorkaise, se découvre une passion pour une étrange femme quelque peu "bohemienne" et récemment arrivée d'Europe. Edith Wharton nous fascine par ses descriptions du caractère des hommes, leurs travers, leurs secrets inavouables dans une société criblée de préjugés. Très fin. A lire, en anglais, si possible.
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Par sniezyca on 20 juillet 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Excellent livre, surprenante et audacieuse analyse de la société de XIX sciècle, l'histoire très universelle et plutôt moderne. A conseiller vivement.
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179 internautes sur 180 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Passion and the outsider 14 février 2010
Par E. A Solinas - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle
It was a glittering, sumptuous time when hypocrisy was expected, discreet infidelity tolerated, and unconventionality ostracized.

That is the Gilded Age, and nobody knew its hypocrises better than Edith Wharton.... and nobody portrayed them as well. "The Age of Innocence" is a trip back in time to the stuffy upper crust of "old New York," taking us through one respectable man's hopeless love affair with a beautiful woman -- and the life he isn't brave enough to have.

Newland Archer, of a wealthy old New York family, has become engaged to pretty, naive May Welland. But as he tries to get their wedding date moved up, he becomes acquainted with May's exotic cousin, Countess Ellen Olenska, who has returned home after dumping her cheating husband. At first, the two are just friends, but Newland becomes more and more entranced by the Countess' easy, free-spirited European charm.

After Newland marries May, the attraction to the mysterious Countess and her free, unconventional life becomes even stronger. He starts to rebel in little ways, but he's still mired in a 100% conventional marriage, job and life. Will he become an outcast and go away with the beautiful countess, or will he stick with May and the safe, dull life that he has condemned in others?

There's nothing too scandalous about "Age of Innocence" in a time when starlets acquire and discard boyfriends and husbands like old pantyhose -- it probably wasn't in the 1920s when it was first published. But then, this isn't a book about sexiness and steam -- it's part bittersweet romance, part social satire, and a look at what happens when human beings lose all spontaneity and passion.

Part of this is due to Wharton's portrayal of New York in the 1870s -- opulent, cultured, pleasant, yet so tied up in tradition that few people in it are able to really open up and live. It's a haze of ballrooms, gardens, engagements, and careful social rituals that absolutely MUST be followed, even if they have no meaning. It's a place "where the real thing was never said or done or even thought."

And Wharton writes distant, slightly mocking prose that outlines this sheltered little society. Her writing opens as slowly and beautifully as a rosebud, letting subtle subplots and powerful, hidden emotions drive the story. So don't be discouraged by the endless conversations about flowers, ballrooms, gloves and old family scandals that don't really matter anymore.

In the middle of all this, Newland is a rather dull, intelligent young man who thinks he's unconventional. But he becomes more interesting as he struggles between his conscience and his longing for the Countess. And as "Age of Innocence" winds on, you gradually see that he doesn't truly love the Countess, but what she represents -- freedom from society and convention.

The other two angles of this love triangle are May and Ellen. May is (suitably) pallid and rather dull, though she shows some different sides in the last few chapters. And Ellen is a magnificent character -- alluring, mysterious, but also bewildered by New York's hostility to her ways. And she's even more interesting when you realize that she isn't trying to rebel, but simply being herself.

"Age of Innocence" is a subtle look at life in Gilded Age New York, telling the story of a man desperately in love with a way of life he hasn't got the courage to pursue. Exquisite in its details, painful in its beauty.
62 internautes sur 62 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
"An atmosphere of faint implications and pale delicacies." 2 mars 2005
Par Mary Whipple - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Newland Archer, the protagonist of this ironically entitled novel set in the late nineteenth century, is a proper New York gentleman, and part of a society which adheres to strict social codes, subordinating all aspects of life to doing what is expected, which is synonymous with doing what it right. As the author remarks early in the novel, "Few things were more awful than an offense against Taste." Newland meets and marries May Welland, an unimaginative, shallow young woman whose upbringing has made her the perfect, inoffensive wife, one who knows how to behave and how to adhere to the "rules" of the society in which they live.

When Newland is reintroduced to May's cousin, Countess Ellen Olenska, who has left her husband in Europe and now wants a divorce, he finds himself utterly captivated by her independence and her willingness to risk all, socially, by flouting convention. Both Ellen and Newland are products of their upbringing and their culture, however, and they resist their feelings because of their separate social obligations. Various meetings between them suggest that their feelings are far stronger than what is obvious on the surface, and the question of whether they will finally state the obvious or act on their feelings constitutes the plot.

Wharton creates an exceptionally realistic picture of New York in the post-Civil War era, a time in which aristocrats of inherited wealth found themselves competing socially with parvenus. Her ability to show the conflict between a person's need for social acceptance and the desire for personal freedom is striking. As the various characters make their peace with their decisions--either to challenge or yield to social dictates--the novel achieves an unusual dramatic tension, subtle because of its lack of direct confrontation and powerful in its effects on individual destinies. This is, in fact, less an "age of innocence" than it is an age of social manipulation.

Wharton herself manipulates the reader--some of her best dialogues and scenes are those the characters never actually have--conversations that they imagine, confrontations which they never allow themselves to have, and resolutions which happen through inaction rather than through decision-making. Filled with acute social observations, the novel shows individuals convincing themselves that obeying social dictates is the right thing to do. Though the novel sometimes seems claustrophobic due to its limitations on action, Age of Innocence brilliantly captures the age and attitudes of the era. Mary Whipple
46 internautes sur 47 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Newland Archer, "a man to whom nothing was ever to happen." 6 mai 2005
Par Mary Whipple - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Poche
Newland Archer, the protagonist of this ironically entitled novel set in the late nineteenth century, is a proper New York gentleman, and part of a society which adheres to strict social codes, subordinating all aspects of life to doing what is expected, which is synonymous with doing what it right. As the author remarks early in the novel, "Few things were more awful than an offense against Taste." Newland meets and marries May Welland, an unimaginative, shallow young woman whose upbringing has made her the perfect, inoffensive wife, one who knows how to behave and how to adhere to the "rules" of the society in which they live.

When Newland is reintroduced to May's cousin, Countess Ellen Olenska, who has left her husband in Europe and now wants a divorce, he finds himself utterly captivated by her freedom and her willingness to risk all, socially, by flouting convention. Both Ellen and Newland, however, are products of their upbringing and their culture, and they dutifully resist their feelings because of their separate social obligations. Various meetings between them suggest that their feelings are far stronger than what is obvious on the surface, and the question of whether either of them will finally state their feelings pervades the novel.

Wharton creates an exceptionally realistic picture of New York in the post-Civil War era, a time in which aristocrats of inherited wealth found themselves competing socially with parvenus, and social rules were changing. Her ability to show the conflict between a person's desire for freedom and his/her need for social acceptance is striking. As the various characters make their peace with their decisions--either to conform to or to challenge social dictates--the novel achieves an unusual dramatic tension, subtle because of its lack of direct confrontation and powerful in its effects on individual destinies. This is, in fact, less an "age of innocence" than it is an age of social manipulation.

Wharton herself manipulates the reader--her best dialogues are those in which the characters never actually participate--conversations that they keep to themselves, confrontations which they never allow themselves to have, and resolutions which happen through inaction rather than through decision-making. Filled with acute social observations, the novel shows individuals convincing themselves that obeying social dictates is the right thing to do. Though the novel sometimes seems to smother the reader with its limitations on action, Age of Innocence brilliantly captures the age and attitudes of the era. Mary Whipple
55 internautes sur 59 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
American Middlemarch? 11 mars 2001
Par Joanna Daneman - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Poche
This is a stunning masterpiece of American literature. Wharton reaches the heights achieved by England's George Eliot in Middlemarch. Age of Innnocence is considered one of the top 100 novels in the English language and I heartily agree. The novel is set in the Golden Age of New York high society in the 1870's. Like Middlemarch, manners and rigid conformity assure success. Love is an anomaly.
Newland Archer, rich and well-connected, is poised to marry May Welland. She is beautiful, suitable and pure. In fact she is compared to a Diana, goddess of the hunt. This is the virgin archetype, untouchable, pure and only desirable from a distance. Archer meets her scandalous cousin, the Countess Olenska. Olenska has committed the unforgivable and left her husband for another man. She is taboo. She is also older, wiser and sexual (more taboos.) Archer is irrestibly drawn to her and thus forms the conflict for the rest of the novel.
No one of her era writes of toxic marriages better than Wharton; she had her own tragic marriage to a man who used her fortune to set up a house for his mistress. And don't forget Wharton's equally famous novel Ethan Frome, about another toxic marriage that ends in grief.
Good news,by the way; Wharton's home in Lennox, MA, the Mount, is being restored. It's home to a resident theater that does some brilliant Shakespeare. If you have a chance to go, do so. It's a wonderful experience.
40 internautes sur 42 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A Stirring Social Commentary 1 novembre 2000
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I am a college student with a plethora of essays to write, tests to study for, and books to read (most of which I honestly don't have time to finish); but many a task were set aside and the fluorescent light in my dorm room burned late into the night as I was drawn into Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence. I was enticed by every one of Wharton's characters and the settings they so splendidly occupy. In the first scene, we are not only introduced to the central characters of the novel, but also to Wharton's keen insight on New York high society in the 1870's; they are a people who "dreaded scandal more than disease," and "want to get away from amusement ever more quickly than they want to get to it." We meet and are immediately attracted to the young and intelligent Newland Archer, who is admiring from afar his fiancé-to-be at the New York Opera. Both Archer and his love, May Welland, are of the highest class and make the most fitting couple (as is to be expected). But as Archer is studying May's purity and imagining their wedded bliss, he notices the entrance of a scandalously clad young woman into May's opera box. [Insert dramatic music] The appearance of Countess Olenska (May's cousin) triggers gasps and rumors from the observant, and introduces the central and ensuing conflicts of the novel: non-conformity versus docile submission, passionate love versus restraint and responsibility. In The Age of Innocence, Wharton presents a dichotomy of characters that we are compelled to identify with. She submits a moral dilemma that she purposefully neglects to resolve. My passionate, impulsive side yearned for Archer to forget any and all promises he had made, to forget the shame that he would bring upon his and May's family, and just escape with Countess Olenska from the stiff New York society forced upon him. But my reasonable, more stable side knew that this would only have tragic results for all involved. But should he endure a life of tedium just to keep up appearances? Was it in fact a life if tedium, or did it prove fruitful in the end? These are all quandaries left for Wharton's audience to sort through and decide for themselves. I love The Age of Innocence; Wharton paints a lucid portrait of a society I was unfamiliar with but now feel inexplicably linked to; of a people who were consciously blinded by a rigid stratum of etiquette and propriety. I am grateful to live in a much more liberated time, where my every word and action isn't scrutinized by an entire city. But I couldn't help but be enthralled and enchanted by the gas lit streets, the majestic ballrooms, and the other charming aspects of old New York. The Age of Innocence is one of the best social commentaries I have ever read, and I recommend it to all.
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