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The Art of Innovation: Lessons in Creativity from Ideo, America's Leading Design Firm (Anglais) Broché – 4 mars 2002

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Descriptions du produit


1 -- Innovation at the Top

Innovation wasn't always a hot topic in the Silicon Valley. More than a decade ago, when our firm was just a small group of product designers working over a dress shop in Palo Alto, we became very interested in why companies looked outside for product development. We hired a professional services firm to help answer that question, and after interviewing many clients (and nonclients) we distilled the answers down into four key reasons: One was just raw capacity. Companies had a bigger appetite than their in-house resources could satisfy. The second was speed. If they couldn't find anybody in-house to sign up to some incredibly tight deadline, they would look outside. The third reason was the need for some specific expertise outside their core competencies. And the fourth was innovation.

Well, a funny thing has happened in the ensuing years. Innovation has risen from the bottom to the top of the list. During that time, IDEO has broadened its client base to include some of the best-known and best-managed companies in the world. I personally have met with executives from more than a thousand companies to talk about their organizations' emerging technologies, market perceptions, and, of course, product development plans. With more than a thousand firsthand experiences, it's hard not to spot emerging trends unless you are truly asleep at the wheel. The biggest single trend we've observed is the growing acknowledgment of innovation as a centerpiece of corporate strategies and initiatives. What's more, we've noticed that the more senior the executives, the more likely they are to frame their companies' needs in the context of innovation.

To those few companies sitting on the innovation fence, business writer Gary Hamel has a dire prediction: "Out there in some garage is an entrepreneur who's forging a bullet with your company's name on it. You've got one option now?to shoot first. You've got to out-innovate the innovators."

Today companies seem to have an almost insatiable thirst for knowledge, expertise, methodologies, and work practices around innovation. The purpose of this book is to help satisfy some of that thirst, drawing on IDEO's experience from the "front lines" of more than three thousand new product development programs. Our experience is direct and immediate, earned from practical application, not management theory. We've helped old-line Fortune 500 companies reinvent their organizations and bold young start-ups create new industries. We've helped design some of the world's most successful products, everything from the original Apple mouse, once called "the most lovable icon of the computer age." to the elegant Palm V handheld organizer. Whether you are a senior executive, a product manager, an R&D team leader, or a business unit manager, we believe this book can help you innovate.

One of the advantages of our front-lines experience is that we've collected a wealth of contemporary success stories from leading companies around the world. We've linked those organizational achievements to specific methodologies and tools you can use to build innovation into your own organization. I think you'll find that this book will help you to arrive at insights that are directly relevant to you and your company.

I joined IDEO in the late 1980s, when it was reaching that critical stage at which many start-ups either stall or implode. Since that time, however, IDEO has grown dramatically in size and influence, and Fast Company magazine now calls it "the world's most celebrated design firm." The Wall Street Journal dubbed our offices "Imagination's Playground," and Fortune titled its visit to IDEO "A Day at Innovation U." Every spring, Business Week publishes a feature story on the power of design in business and includes a cumulative tally of firms who have won the most Industrial Design Excellence Awards. IDEO has topped that list for ten years running.

What's unique about IDEO is that we straddle both sides of the innovation business, as both practitioners and advisers. Every day we work with the world's premier companies to bring innovative products and services to market. Even the best management consulting firms don't enjoy that hands-on, in-the-trenches experience. Yet, like the best consulting firms, we sometimes host teams from multinational companies who want to learn from our culture and steep themselves in our methodology. In other words, we don't just teach the process of innovation. We actually do it, day in and day out.

As I was completing this book, Tiger Woods was winning the U.S. Open golf tournament at Pebble Beach, dominating the field as never before. He seemed both intense and utterly calm. His dedication was complete, and his swing and putting were nearly perfect. In spite of what looked like masterful putting in his first round, he insisted that the balls weren't going into the hole smoothly enough for him. They were just "scooting," he said, not rolling. He stayed on the practice green till they rolled beautifully. Butch Harmon, his swing guru, said Tiger was playing better than ever. "He's confident. He's mature," said Harmon. "We've built his swing together, so it's pretty easy to tweak if something goes wrong." I found that a wonderful, enlightening statement. The greatest golfer in history, who appears to be the ultimate solo performer, is actually the product of a team effort, and when the occasional bumps in the road arrive, the going is easier because of that fact.

Our approach to innovation is part golf swing, part secret recipe. There are specific elements we believe will help you and your company to be more innovative. But it's not a matter of simply following directions. Our "secret formula" is actually not very formulaic. It's a blend of methodologies, work practices, culture, and infrastructure. Methodology alone is not enough. For example, as you'll see in chapter 6, prototyping is both a step in the innovation process and a philosophy about moving continuously forward, even when some variables are still undefined. And brainstorming (covered in chapter 4) is not just a valuable creative tool at the fuzzy front end of projects. It's also a pervasive cultural influence for making sure that individuals don't waste too much energy spinning their wheels on a tough problem when the collective wisdom of the team can get them "unstuck" in less than an hour. Success depends on both what you do and how you do it.

The Innovation Decathlon

Here's the good news. Neither you nor your company needs to be best of class in every category. Like an Olympic decathlon, the object is to achieve true excellence in a few areas, and strength in many. If you're the best in the world at uncovering your customers' latent, unspoken needs, the strength of your insights might help you succeed in spite of shortcomings elsewhere. Similarly, if you can paint a compelling visualization of the future, maybe your partners (suppliers, distributors, consultants, etc.) or even your customers can help you get there. If there are ten events in creating and sustaining an innovative culture, what counts is your total score, your ability to regularly best the competition in the full range of daily tests that every company faces.

A Method to Our Madness

Because of the eclectic appearance of our office space and the frenetic, sometimes boisterous work and play in process, some people come away from their first visit to our offices with the impression that IDEO is totally chaotic. In fact, we have a well-developed and continuously refined methodology; it's just that we interpret that methodology very differently according to the nature of the task at hand. Loosely described, that methodology has five basic steps:

1. Understand the market, the client, the technology, and the perceived constraints on the problem. Later in a project, we often challenge those constraints, but it's important to understand current perceptions.

2. Observe real people in real-life situations to find out what makes them tick: what confuses them, what they like, what they hate, where they have latent needs not addressed by current products and services. (More about this step in chapter 3.)

3. Visualize new-to-the-world concepts and the customers who will use them. Some people think of this step as predicting the future, and it is probably the most brainstorming-intensive phase of the process. Quite often, the visualization takes the form of a computer-based rendering or simulation, though IDEO also builds thousands of physical models and prototypes every year. For new product categories we sometimes visualize the customer experience by using composite characters and storyboard-illustrated scenarios. In some cases, we even make a video that portrays life with the future product before it really exists.

4. Evaluate and refine the prototypes in a series of quick iterations. We try not to get too attached to the first few prototypes, because we know they'll change. No idea is so good that it can't be improved upon, and we plan on a series of improvements. We get input from our internal team, from the client team, from knowledgeable people not directly involved with the project, and from people who make up the target market. We watch for what works and what doesn't, what confuses people, what they seem to like, and we incrementally improve the product in the next round.

5. Implement the new concept for commercialization. This phase is often the longest and most technically challenging in the development process, but I believe that IDEO's ability to successfully implement lends credibility to all the creative work that goes before.

We've demonstrated that this deceptively simple methodology works for everything from creating simple children's toys to launching e-commerce businesses. It's a process that has helped create products that have already saved scores of lives, from portable defibrillators and better insulin-delivery systems to devices that help grow sheets of new skin for burn victims. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

Revue de presse

Advance praise for The Art of Innovation:

"Tom Kelley has unlocked the magic box of innovation for corporate America. At a time when creativity and innovation are the driving forces for the New Economy, Kelley shows how IDEO does it - and how companies everywhere can learn to build the products and services we all crave. If you're trying to create product lust, The Art of Innovation shows you how to do it."
-- Bruce Nussbaum, Business Week

"Everyone talks about innovation and creativity, but IDEO has actually done it. The Art of Innovation provides detailed, actionable ideas about how to build an innovative culture and an organization that makes creativity seem routine. Its well-placed emphasis on management practices makes it a great read for anyone in any organization who wants to get better at what
they do."
-- Jeffrey Pfeffer, Professor, Stanford Business School, and author of The Knowing-Doing Gap

What the world has been saying about IDEO:

"IDEO Product Development is the world's most celebrated design firm. Its ultimate creation is the process of creativity itself. For founder David M. Kelley and his colleagues, work is play, brainstorming is a science, and the most important rule is to break the rules... Can this formula for creativity work in other places? Some of the world's leading companies certainly think so."
-- Fast Company

"One of the hottest product development firms on the planet."
-- Production Magazine

"The fuel that starts the design engine is innovation, and, for once, the creative and business departments seem to agree: innovation is good. By definition, design is about change; this is what drives clients to IDEO. For the people at IDEO, change is interchangeable with progress."
-- Graphis3 magazine

"The ultimate candy store for design-technology-creativity buffs."
-- Tom Peters, On Excellence --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

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Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 320 pages
  • Editeur : Profile Business; Édition : New Ed (4 mars 2002)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 186197583X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861975836
  • Dimensions du produit: 12,9 x 2 x 19,8 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (2 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 15.431 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Index | Quatrième de couverture
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Un client le 2 octobre 2004
Format: Relié
...pour tous les entrepreneurs, et indispensable pour les plus jeunes et débutants. Même si votre orientation professionnelle est différente, la méthode utilisée par IDEO vous guide tout au long du chemin entre la demande et l'idée finie. Tous les chapitres de ce livre utilisent les vraies histoires des succès en utilisant les moyens les plus simples : observation des besoins et des habitudes quotidiennes des personnes ordinaires.
C'est aussi un titre qui va vous enseigner ou sont les limites de la créativité...
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Format: Relié
L'auteur a voulu, non pas donner une leçon de créativité mais rendre le lecteur perspicace, observateur. L'auteur nous apprend que la faculté d'innover a un frein: l'innovateur lui même. Ouvrir son esprit, abandonner ses limites et convictions et observer..voilà quelques secrets dévoilés. Le livre est écrit sous une lumière positive de l'innovation qui stimule le lecteur dans sa volonté de créer. Le risque de l'innovation est contrebalancé à juste titre par l'aura de succès mérité de ceux qui ont osé tout simplement. Bref, une source d'inspiration et de motivation à ne pas laisser passer. Le prix de l'ouvrage est très largement justifié, surtout pour une aussi belle couverture.
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Amazon.com: 113 commentaires
126 internautes sur 134 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Less than expected 4 octobre 2001
Par Stephen Funk - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
The Art of Innovation is the story of the famous Palo Alto based design firm, IDEO. The book is easy to read and moves quickly. The author, Tom Kelley, is the brother of founder David Kelley. Tom is the General Manager and is an ex-management consultant. This is important because the book really devolves into a light treatise on business management practices. This makes sense since given Tom Kelley's responsibilities at IDEO and his background. It also explains the Tom Peter's Foreword. If you like Tom Peter's books, you will enjoy this book.
If you are looking for real insights into the IDEO design process you will be disappointed. Most of the insights are of a personnel management nature, and even those are at a relatively high level. Mr. Kelley pokes more than a few veiled barbs at the slow industrial giants who simply cannot compete with the brain power and management prowess at IDEO. That may sound sarcastic, but Mr. Kelley's pride in his company often crosses that fine line into arrogance.
There are a few actual projects described to point out how valuable a certain IDEO practice is. There are repeated references to IDEO's contribution to the invention of the Apple mouse and follow-up work on the Microsoft Mouse. Also, a great deal of time is spent talking about the redesign of the common shopping cart that was done in one week for a segment on Nightline. I know that IDEO has had many important clients and recent important projects. Perhaps they can't talk about them because of non-disclosure agreements. There are color pictures of some products at the beginning of each of 15 chapters but often there is no mention of those products in the text. Some black & white photographs of products and the IDEO workspaces also accompany the text. There are no diagrams or illustrations.
A great deal of the book outlines the emphasis that IDEO puts on the treatment of their employees and their penchant for quick and frequent prototyping as a key to success. All projects start by assigning a "hot" team and letting them brainstorm and prototype their way into some great ideas. No details are given on how the teams are formed or managed.
This book is for you if you are looking for a light management practices book and just a little insight into a premier design firm. You will probably be disappointed if you want to find out how products are designed or what specific processes are used to manage the design process. You also will not get a great deal of competitive information about IDEO. The book assumes that you have at least a general idea of what Industrial Design is about.
Tom Kelley admits that workshops about the "IDEO way" have been turned into a profit center. They give seminars on how to organize product development at client companies. I could see IDEO including this book with their seminar, or perhaps they could give it to a prospective client to whet their appetite. It definitely leaves you wanting more information. I am left wondering, "How much is that seminar, and will they let me in?"
49 internautes sur 52 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A business book for design people. (And vice versa.) 4 juin 2002
Par Adam Greenfield - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
First, let me say what this book is not:
It's NOT a granular, specific, detailed guide to product-design best practices.
Nor is it "Give Your Shop The IDEO Makeover In Ten Easy Steps."
What it is, and what it excels at being, is a genial, fast-paced, reasonably persuasive argument in favor of companies that more closely suit the requirements of creative human beings.
Kelley's logic goes something like this:
- gather insightful, motivated human beings, regardless of disciplinary background;
- put them under intense deadline pressure, yet pamper them in ways that reinforce a sense of community;
- challenge them to do great, creative work;
- and stand back as they blow you away with sideways solutions the likes of which the world has never seen.
This might sound like a recipe for a Montessori for middle-aged hippies, except that IDEO's track record is so impressively studded with design breakthroughs that those of us in the field hold them in the highest respect. Not only that, IDEO's designs have proven to be winners in the market, winning over the hardest-nosed of quants.
Kelley successfully makes the case that design is rapidly becoming critical to success in business; that innovation and creativity are the engines of good design; and that environments like the ones IDEO provides for its workers are reasonably reliable incubators of same. If you find yourself engaged by this description, you'll probably, eventually, want more detail than the book is able to provide, but it's a grand place to start.
27 internautes sur 29 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Innovation for Fun as Well as Profit 21 avril 2001
Par Robert Morris - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
There are dozens of excellent books which discuss innovation. This is one of the best but don't be misled by the title, "Lessons in creativity from IDEO, America's leading design firm." Unlike almost all other authors of worthy books on the same subject, Kelley does NOT organize his material in terms of a sequence of specific "lessons"...nor does he inundate his reader with checklists, "executive summaries", bullet points, do's and don'ts, "key points", etc. Rather, he shares what I guess you could characterize as "stories" based on real-world situations in which he and his IDEO associates solved various problems when completing industrial design assignments for their clients. "We've linked those organizational achievements to specific methodologies and tools you can use to build innovation into your own organization...[However, IDEO's] `secret formula' is actually not very formulaic. It's a blend of of methodologies, work practices, culture, and infrastructure. Methodology alone is not enough." One of the greatest benefits of the book is derived from direct access to that "blend" when activated.
It is extremely difficult to overcome what James O'Toole characterizes, in Leading Change, as "the ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom." He and Kelley seem to be kindred spirits: Both fully understand how and why truly innovative thinking encounters so much resistance within organizations. Whereas O'Toole suggests all manner of strategies to overcome that resistance, Kelley concentrates on the combination ("blend") of ingredients which, when integrated and then applied with both rigor and passion, may (just may) produce what Jobs once referred to as "insanely great." What both O'Toole and Kelley have in mind is creating and sustaining an innovative culture, one from within which "insanely great" ideas can result in breakthrough products and (yes) services.
"Loosely described", Kelley shares IDEO's five-step methodology: Understand the market, the client, the technology, and the perceived constraints on the given problem; observe real people in real-life situations; literally visualize new-to-the-world concepts AND the customers who will use them; evaluate and refine the prototypes in a series of quick iterations; and finally, implement the new concept for commercialization. With regard to the last "step", as Bennis explains in Organizing Genius, Apple executives immediately recognized the commercial opportunities for PARC's technology. Larry Tesler (who later left PARC for Apple) noted that Jobs and companions "wanted to get it out to the world." But first, obviously, create that "it."
Kelley and his associates at IDEO have won numerous awards for designing all manner of innovative products such as the Apple mouse, the Palm Pilot, a one-piece fishing mechanism for children, the in-vehicle beverage holder, toothpaste tubes that don't "gunk up" in the cap area, "mud-free" water bottles for mountain bikers, a small digital camera for the handspring Visor, and the Sun Tracker Beach Chair.
With all due respect to products such as these, what interested me most was the material in the book which focuses on (a) the physical environment in which those at IDEO interact and (b) the nature and extent of that interaction, principally the brainstorm sessions. In the Foreword, Tom Peters has this in mind when explaining why Kelley's is a marvelous book: "It carefully walks us through each stage of the IDEO innovation process -- from creating hot teams (IDEO is perpetually on `boil') to learning to see through the customer's eyes (forget focus groups!) and brainstorming (trust me, nobody but nobody does it better) to rapid prototyping (and nobody, but nobody does it better...)." Whatever your current situation, whatever the size and nature of your organization, surely you and it need to avoid or escape from "the ideology of comfort and the tyranny of custom." Granted, you may never be involved in the creation of an "insanely great" product but Kelley can at least help you to gain "the true spirit of innovation" in your life. I join him in wishing you "some serious fun."
73 internautes sur 90 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Buyer Beware: It's written by a management consultant! 21 février 2001
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
I heard an interview with the author, Tom Kelley, on NPR and was fascinated by not only his talent for humorous storytelling, but also the stories he shared about product development at IDEO. After reading a short summary of the book I expected to read many marvelous stories about the process of product innovation, and all the twists and turns it involves - much like the author had discussed on the radio. I wanted to hear about the I-zone camera, the mouse... but to my chagrin, stories like these are only peripheral to the main focus of The Art of Innovation. Unfortunately, this isn't a book about invention - it's a business book, about somewhat dry things like how to run meetings, how to put together teams. However, I dutifully continued through the book, hoping to find more of the anecdotes that I had hoped for, until on page p. 132 it was all revealed in a paragraph that began, "As a management consultant..." What an ephiphany! I wanted to read a book by a designer, a free-spirited thinker, not a managment consultant. This book unfortunately feels more like something my boss would ask me to read for work rather than a peek inside the mind of quirky genius inventors that I would choose for leisure reading.
26 internautes sur 30 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Tom Kelleys Poker Face 12 février 2001
Par Kevin Deevey - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I just finished the book. Let me preface this with the fact that I've been an admirer of Tom Kelley and IDEO for quite some time now. I truely believe that they have a formula for success. Unfortunatly, Mr. Kelley keeps his secrets close to his chest. The book is a wonderful read, if your looking for "warm and fuzzy" techniques for managing innovation, but the thruth is many of us need measurable and quantifiable facts/processes to move our businesses forward. Obviously, this is the IP of IDEO and the're not about to give it away to sell books. If your career is about innovation, you need to know everything about IDEO, but I don't think you can rely on this book to do that.
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