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The Cold Moon: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel
 
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The Cold Moon: A Lincoln Rhyme Novel [Format Kindle]

Jeffery Deaver

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Extrait

The Cold Moon

Chapter 1


Image “How long did it take them to die?”

The man this question was posed to didn’t seem to hear it. He looked in the rearview mirror again and concentrated on his driving. The hour was just past midnight and the streets in lower Manhattan were icy. A cold front had swept the sky clear and turned an earlier snow to slick glaze on the asphalt and concrete. The two men were in the rattling Band-Aid-mobile, as Clever Vincent had dubbed the tan SUV. It was a few years old; the brakes needed servicing and the tires replacing. But taking a stolen vehicle in for work would not be a wise idea, especially since two of its recent passengers were now murder victims.

The driver—a lean man in his fifties, with trim black hair—made a careful turn down a side street and continued his journey, never speeding, making precise turns, perfectly centered in his lane. He’d drive the same whether the streets were slippery or dry, whether the vehicle had just been involved in murder or not.

Careful, meticulous.

How long did it take?

Big Vincent—Vincent with long, sausage fingers, always damp, and a taut brown belt stretching the first hole—shivered hard. He’d been waiting on the street corner after his night shift as a word-processing temp. It was bitterly cold but Vincent didn’t like the lobby of his building. The light was greenish and the walls were covered with big mirrors in which he could see his oval body from all angles. So he’d stepped into the clear, cold December air and paced and ate a candy bar. Okay, two.

As Vincent was glancing up at the full moon, a shockingly white disk visible for a moment through a canyon of buildings, the Watchmaker reflected aloud, “How long did it take them to die? Interesting.”

Vincent had known the Watchmaker—whose real name was Gerald Duncan—for only a short time but he’d learned that you asked the man questions at your own risk. Even a simple query could open the door to a monologue. Man, could he talk. And his answers were always organized, like a college professor’s. Vincent knew that the silence for the last few minutes was because Duncan was considering his answer.

Vincent opened a can of Pepsi. He was cold but he needed something sweet. He chugged it and put the empty can in his pocket. He ate a packet of peanut butter crackers. Duncan looked over to make sure Vincent was wearing gloves. They always wore gloves in the Band-Aid-Mobile.

Meticulous . . .

“I’d say there are several answers to that,” Duncan said in his soft, detached voice. “For instance, the first one I killed was twenty-four, so you could say it took him twenty-four years to die.”

Like, yeah . . . thought Clever Vincent with the sarcasm of a teenager, though he had to admit that this obvious answer hadn’t occurred to him.

“The other was thirty-two, I think.”

A police car drove by, the opposite way. The blood in Vincent’s temples began pounding but Duncan didn’t react. The cops showed no interest in the stolen Explorer.

“Another way to answer the question,” Duncan said, “is to consider the elapsed time from the moment I started until their hearts stopped beating. That’s probably what you meant. See, people want to put time into easy-to-digest frames of reference. That’s valid, as long as it’s helpful. Knowing the contractions come every twenty seconds is helpful. So is knowing that the athlete ran a mile in three minutes, fifty-eight seconds, so he wins the race. Specifically how long it took them tonight to die . . . well, that isn’t important, as long as it wasn’t fast.” A glance at Vincent. “I’m not being critical of your question.”

“No,” Vincent said, not caring if he was critical. Vincent Reynolds didn’t have many friends and could put up with a lot from Gerald Duncan. “I was just curious.”

“I understand. I just didn’t pay any attention. But the next one, I’ll time it.”

“The girl? Tomorrow?” Vincent’s heart beat just a bit faster.

He nodded. “Later today, you mean.”

It was after midnight. With Gerald Duncan you had to be precise, especially when it came to time.

“Right.”

Hungry Vincent had nosed out Clever Vincent now that he was thinking of Joanne, the girl who’d die next.

Later today . . .

The killer drove in a complicated pattern back to their temporary home in the Chelsea district of Manhattan, south of Midtown, near the river. The streets were deserted; the temperature was in the teens and the wind flowed steadily through the narrow streets.

Duncan parked at a curb and shut the engine off, set the parking brake. The men stepped out. They walked for a half block through the icy wind. Duncan glanced down at his shadow on the sidewalk, cast by the moon. “I’ve thought of another answer. About how long it took them to die.”

Vincent shivered again—mostly, but not only, from the cold.

“When you look at it from their point of view,” the killer said, “you could say that it took forever.”

From Publishers Weekly

Bestseller Deaver's twisty seventh Lincoln Rhyme novel (after 2005's The Twelfth Card) pits Rhyme, the quadriplegic NYPD detective, against a brilliant criminal mastermind called the Watchmaker. Assisted by his longtime partner, Det. Amelia Sachs, an expert at forensic analysis, Rhyme probes two bizarre murders linked by the killer's calling card—a clock left at the scene. The Watchmaker, as an ominous poem also left at the scene suggests, is bent on executing eight more people in a variety of ways intended to prolong their suffering. Deaver cleverly alternates between the Rhyme/Sachs team and the Watchmaker and his assistant, heightening tension by introducing the next targets and humanizing them. Sachs loses some focus when she also has to probe a suicide that she suspects is connected with some corrupt brother officers. Deaver fans won't be surprised that the investigations overlap, or that the several apparent climaxes are building to something more, but even they will be hard-pressed to peel back all the layers of the cunning plot at work beneath the surface. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2421 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 656 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : B003E7ETW6
  • Editeur : Simon & Schuster; Édition : Reprint (30 mai 2006)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B000GCFXKO
  • Synthèse vocale : Non activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°117.823 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Amazon.com: 4.1 étoiles sur 5  208 commentaires
55 internautes sur 59 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Still crazy after all these years.... 31 mai 2006
Par Robert Busko - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Jeffery Deaver's newest story The Cold Moon feels a lot like his first Lincoln Rhyme novel The Bone Collector. Both stories deal with serial killers that have a taste for slow and unique deaths of their victims. Both killers like to bait the police and leave unique clues. I loved The Cold Moon for the same reason I became a hooked Deaver reader after The Bone Collector....Deaver delivers your monies worth with each page. He is like no other writer today.

In The Cold Moon Amelia Sachs, Rhyme's key investigator, and Rhyme must match wits with the Watchmaker, a killer that leaves a clock with each victim. In the course of the investigation, we discover that the killer purchased ten clocks leading the investigators to conclude that there is to be ten victims, not a pleasant thought given the killer's taste for suffering.

Deaver gives us more information about Amelia's history adding depth to her character. He also introduces Kathry Dance an investigator from the California Bureau of Investigation. Kathryn can smell a lie before you tell it. Deaver is a master storyteller who manages to deliver one twist after another and paces The Cold Moon with the reader in mind. I was surprised in the end.....

Chalk up another hit for Deaver.
19 internautes sur 20 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Deaver and The Watchmaker will keep you guessing 30 mai 2006
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
In their seventh adventure, Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs square off against a criminal who calls himself "The Watchmaker," a master assassin who gives new meaning to the phrase "a riddle wrapped up in an enigma"--you'll spend a lot of time trying to figure out what his game is, but to no avail. That's because The Cold Moon is quintessential Deaver--just when you're patting yourself on the back for having figured everything out, the author, through literary sleight of hand, throws you one of his trademark curveballs, keeping his heroes and his readers in a constant state of confusion and agitation right up until the very last pages of this swift paced and surprising thriller. Although this is what Deaver has become famous for, he seems to be having more fun than usual with the canny and devious Watchmaker, an observation borne out by the unusual ending the author provides.

Another character in The Cold Moon who seems to have found her way into Deaver's heart is consultant Kathryn Dance, the human lie detector who plays a key role in helping Rhyme and company frustrate the machinations of the Watchmaker. Dance, who works with the California Bureau of Investigation, is an expert in the field of kinesics, the science of body language, nonverbal gestures, postures and facial expressions by which a person manifests various physical, mental or emotional states, and communicates nonverbally with others. Deaver has told Mystery Scene magazine that he's already hard at work on a stand alone novel featuring Dance, tentatively titled The Sleeping Doll. If her solo adventure proves half as interesting and involving as the one she just shared with Lincoln Rhyme, readers should reserve their copies now.
14 internautes sur 16 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Definitely not the best of the Rhyme series, but at least we meet the new protagonist: Kathryn Dance 12 avril 2007
Par Derek - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
No spoilers

I'm a huge fan of the Rhyme series and have enjoyed every book so far, rating each one at least four stars. However, I just can't do it for this one. My issue with this book was that all of the typical Deaver plot twists and turns and the "I didn't see that coming" occurrences were all packed into the last 1/4 of the book. In all of the other Rhyme books, there are twists throughout that keep you glued to it and turning the pages, but in The Cold Moon they just aren't there until the last stretch. Then, once you do get to the surprises, they stretch belief almost to it's breaking point.

If you're a Deaver fan, you have to read this book of course because it is the first to feature Kathryn Dance, the main character of his new series (the second book of the Dance series comes out in June 2007), who is presumably going to be taking the place of Lincoln Rhyme as the main protagonist in Deaver's books.

It isn't the best of the Rhyme books, and it hurts to only give it three stars being such a loyal Deaver fan, but it's was the low point in all of the Rhyme books in my eyes.
7 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Let's Twist Again 14 juin 2007
Par OEJ - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
I believe this is the seventh of the Rhyme-Sachs escapades but I regret to say, as a dedicated fan and owner of fourteen Jeffery Deaver novels, that this particular franchise is in danger of running out of steam. From a technical point of view it is awesome, a masterpiece with highly impressive accounts of police tactics and forensic research, with the psychological science of kinesics now added to the mix. But if there is such a thing as showboating in crime fiction writing then Deaver may be guilty of it, because this tale has more twists than a fistful of fusilli and I for one am growing slightly tired of it. In a way, the first of the many twists was most welcome, because the first story (there's more than one, in effect) was so by-the-numbers Deaver fare that I was almost crying out for the `shock surprise' that would change the direction of the tale completely. The thing is, there's fiction and there's fantasy - not only are the plans of the bad guy - the Watchmaker - rather less than credible in their complexity, but the foresight of Lincoln Rhyme in being able to thwart him is even more so. It's as if the baddie's too bad to be true, and the good guy's too good - or at least has incredible detective skills that border on mind-reading.

If anything, our immobile hero Linc takes something of a back seat (or wheelchair) to his established partner Amelia Sachs and a newcomer to the series in the form of a female kinesics expert (Kathryn Dance - note the musical innuendo again) who just happens to get deeply involved in this case while visiting New York from her native California. Come to think about it, Dance is `on her way to the airport' for the entirety of this novel, but keeps on putting it off to another day. Anyway, Sachs enjoys a new responsibility as lead detective in a suicide case that might just be murder in disguise (guess which!), and this distracts her from helping Rhyme out in his pursuit of the evil Watchmaker. This is a man who seems to have the time for ten seemingly unrelated murders and leaves a clock beside each victim as a calling card. I was relieved when this `plan' altered dramatically and we suddenly found ourselves heading in an utterly different direction, moving away from an almost boring serial-killing spree and onto the slightly more interesting subject of police corruption. That didn't last long though, oh no. Time to get nasty again, and conjure up a completely new objective for the bad guy that has nothing to do with watchmaking or bent coppers. Despite this confusion, Lincoln Rhyme miraculously sees through it all from the comfort of his high-tech town house in Central Park West and basically saves the world. Well, lots of potential victims, at any rate.

Anyone new to the Deaver style may well enjoy all these twists, but for those of us who have seen it all before - and in my case, enjoyed it a lot, to be fair - it was just a little too much. In combining presumably very accurate accounts of forensic science in the pursuit of justice with criminals and criminalists who are just too bad or too good to be true, we are left with a somewhat lop-sided mixture of authentic police procedural work and leading characters who are less than convincing in their identities, objectives and capabilities. In the real world, crime is a lot muckier and so is the solving of it.

Picture Chubby Checker being whipped away by a tornado and you have a ridiculous image of mind-boggling twisting. Or you could read Cold Moon - your impression would be much the same.
5 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A better entry than the previous couple of novels in the series. 15 novembre 2006
Par A. J Thompson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
To the brilliant mind of Lincoln Rhyme it becomes apparent early into the murder investigation that there are two killers involved, working in tandem and perhaps one in slave to the other. A ticking clock is left at the first puzzling murder scene at the docks, and it at first appears as if someone has been suspended until their painful death finally relieves them of their agony. It's nasty, and its attention grabbing to a city that will always forever after be hyper aware of the danger in the every day. A careful killer is calling himself "The Watchmaker", but for the investigating team that all seems a little obvious. There are plenty of crime scenes, but where are the bodies?

Police forensic consultant and former Detective Lincoln Rhyme as always feels immense frustration that he is not out there with his team, walking his own personally devised murder scene "grid" and so must take some satisfaction in that his best eyes and ears, Amelia Sachs, is out there to do it for him. Sachs has her eye on some future goal that might not involve police work, and this is despite the fact that she is riding her first case as Lead homicide Detective. Some of those in the department have always wanted the bright Amelia Sachs to fall from a great height and when her current case leads her down the road into her father's own policing past, she is more able to understand why.

Deaver is a master at suspense, and the ticking clock element to this novel is only a small part of that. There are always so many layers to the Lincoln Rhyme novel that it's delightful to have the knowledge that an early answer will never be THE answer; Deaver we expect to always work the suspense screws skifully right up until the final pages. This is a better novel than the previous one or two in the series which puzzled more than entertained. THE COLD MOON is more tightly crafted with greater cohesion between merging plotlines (which there always seems to be) and less extraneous elements are involved. This series isn't read for the warm and fuzzy character development and stripping it all back down to the action of the escalating hunt has made for a far better read.

On the flip side of this some of the personal issues have been dragged out too far in the series and need to be dealt with. Fans of the series need to have resolution on teasers that were introduced many novels ago, and a retrospective novel probably wouldn't be a bad inclusion either (not an original thought, but would probably be timely).

If you haven't read a Jeffery Deaver novel before, THE COLD MOON would give you a good feel for the series and Deaver makes solid work of providing enough supporting information to enable his books to be read as stand alones. A great book in a stellar series that still has no peer.
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