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The Complete C. S. Lewis Signature Classics (Anglais) Broché – Séquence inédite, 3 mars 2009


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Présentation de l'éditeur

The Complete C.S. Lewis Signature Classics contains seven essential volumes by C.S. Lewis, including Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain, Miracles, A Grief Observed and Lewis’s prophetic examination of universal values, The Abolition of Man. Beautiful and timeless, this is a vital collection by one of the greatest Christian literary figures of the twentieth century.

Quatrième de couverture

A beautiful compilation of inspirational writings, featuring seven classic works in one volume:

Mere Christianity
The Screwtape Letters
The Great Divorce
The Problem of Pain
Miracles
A Grief Observed
The Abolition of Man

C. S. Lewis's works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year, appealing to those seeking wisdom and calm in a hectic and ever-changing world. Each title is written with the lucidity, warmth, and wit that has made Lewis revered as a writer the world over.

From The Problem of Pain—a wise and compassionate exploration of suffering—to the darkly satirical The Screwtape Letters, Lewis is unrivalled in his ability to disentangle the questions of life. His writings offer hope, wisdom, and a true understanding of human nature.



Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 752 pages
  • Editeur : HarperOne; Édition : Reprint (3 mars 2009)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0061208493
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061208492
  • Dimensions du produit: 15,2 x 3,1 x 22,9 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par FrKurt Messick TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS le 14 décembre 2005
Format: Relié
C.S. Lewis was a rare individual. One of the few non-clerics to be recognised as a theologian by the Anglican church, he put forth the case for Christianity in general in ways that many Christians beyond the Anglican world can accept, and a clear description for non-Christians of what Christian faith and practice should be. Indeed, Lewis says in his introduction that this text (or indeed, hardly any other he produced) will help in deciding between Christian denominations. While he describes himself as a 'very ordinary layman' in the Church of England, he looks to the broader picture of Christianity, particularly for those who have little or no background. The discussion of division points rarely wins a convert, Lewis observed, and so he leaves the issues of ecclesiology and high theology differences to 'experts'. Lewis is of course selling himself short in this regard, but it helps to reinforce his point.
This collection contains several of C.S. Lewis' classic works (although it is not in fact a complete collection of all his writings, not even of all his non-fiction writings). It contains the following works: 'Mere Christianity', 'The Screwtape Letters', 'The Great Divorce', 'The Problem of Pain', 'Miracles', 'A Grief Observed', plus 'The Abolition of Man'. It does provide an excellent survey of Lewis' theology, ethics, and general outlook on life. I will highlight two of the selections that show the different ways Lewis approaches things.
For the first example, the book 'Mere Christianity' looks at beliefs, both from a 'natural' standpoint as well as a scripture/tradition/reason standpoint.
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741 internautes sur 747 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
His major religious works, collector quality 1 juin 2003
Par Harold McFarland - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Clive Staples Lewis, better known as C. S. Lewis was one of the most influential Christian thinkers of all time. Whether through symbolism in the Great Divorce, biting satire in the Screwtape Letters, or unflinching logic in Mere Christianity his brilliance shows through clearly. "The Complete C. S. Lewis Signature Classics" contains his seven most popular works - Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, Miracles, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain, A Grief Observed, and The Abolition of Man. While I read many of these years ago as a young Christian and college student this is the first compendium that I have reviewed. Make no mistake about it; this is a collector's edition in all respects - hardbound, nice dust jacket, crisp quality printing, and even an attached ribbon bookmark.
"Mere Christianity" presents the basic tenets of Christianity. C. S. Lewis breaks the book up into four parts - Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe, What Christians Believe, Christian Behaviour, and Beyond Personality: Or First Steps in the Doctrine of the Trinity. This book is one of the most commonly recommended books for new Christians and those who want to understand basic Christian doctrine from a well-rounded apologetics point of view.
"The Screwtape Letters" has been one of my favorite books for many years. While it is fictional it soon becomes quite clear that we are dealing with real world problems. Through thirty-one letters to his nephew, Wormwood, Screwtape consoles and instructs him in how to keep his "patient" from becoming a Christian or at least from becoming an effective one. Using the vehicle of these letters C. S. Lewis examines various issues and problems of the Christian life. For example, he points out to Wormwood that if he can make his "patient" start going all over town looking for a church that "suits" him instead of being loyal to his local church it will reduce his effectiveness. By searching for the "suitable" church he learns to be a critic of churches instead of a pupil of Christianity. Not to mention that the "congregational principle" makes each church into a kind of club for a specific type of person and eventually that becomes a faction. Each letter points out one or more of the insidious ways that a Christian or church can be slowly changed into nothing more than an ineffective shell.
"Miracles" is an examination of the possibility that supernatural events happen in the world. Within the pages C. S. Lewis develops a compelling argument for the existence of miracles and God's personal interaction with the world. Lewis examines miracles not only in the light of Christian belief but also addresses the positions of agnostics and rationalists and shows why their view is less tenable than the existence of miracles.
"The Great Divorce" is another fictional tale in which the narrator takes a bus ride and visits both heaven and hell.
On this fanciful trip he meets supernatural beings and those who have passed on to be consigned to one or the other. Through discussion and observation he soon realizes that the people who are consigned to hell are there because they refuse to give up even minor sinful thoughts for the greatness of heaven. It is sure to challenge your concept of sin, heaven, and hell.
In "The Problem of Pain" C. S. Lewis examines one of the most common questions of Christianity. If God is all-knowing and all-loving then why is there pain and suffering? He deftly deals with that question from a generic point of view and does an excellent job. You have to realize that it is not specific and so will not answer why something happened to someone in particular. However, reading it does help provide a positive understanding of how pain and suffering can actually be a tool to grab our attention and to purify us for heaven.

"A Grief Observed" is one of the best books on grief and working through the effect that it can have on your faith. After losing his wife, C. S. Lewis comes to face grief and the feelings of anger and doubt toward God that often accompany such a loss. Here we see a strong Christian and apologeticist having his faith shaken to the core and come to understand that these feelings are a normal part of grief. However, over time he comes around to working through his grief to a stronger understanding and deeper relationship with God.
"The Abolition of Man" examines moral relativism and education. C. S. Lewis argues that all morals are not relative, some are absolute. His examination of the issues also applies very well to today's concerns with situational ethics. Lewis points out that due to poor education, bad logic, and the advances of science mankind will eventually destroy itself.
If you would like a collection of some of his best known works in a solid collectible single volume you will want to add this one to your library. "The Complete C. S. Lewis Signature Classics" is a very highly recommended purchase whether to read for the first time or as a quality edition for the C. S. Lewis enthusiast.
157 internautes sur 167 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Looks great, more filling! 3 mai 2003
Par Alexander Scott - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
C. S. Lewis is remarkable in his depth of faith and logic while remaining consistently humble about his opinions. Also, he purposefully avoids denominational battles or speaking on denominational doctrines, focusing on Christ instead. When he discusses Christianity, he makes every effort to avoid advancing a denominational agenda and focuses on the things that unite Christians instead. CS Lewis is a refreshing breeze to those who believe that we should be presenting a united front to the world.
Contents:
MERE CHRISTIANITY: An excellent exposition on the necessity of a good, personal God based on observational and philosophical evidence. He then moves to an argument that Christ is a "personality" of that creator God and that Christianity follows "naturally" from what we have already acknowledged to be true. His arguments are 100% as true and effective today as they were when written - I find myself using them today (and surprisingly, belief systems that portray themselves as more "rational" have not yet responded to these criticisms in the past 75 years or so...)
THE SCREWTAPE LETTERS: one can chillingly find the demon Screwtape's suggestions being carried out in our own actions on a regular basis. CS Lewis has an intuition of human nature!
MIRACLES, THE PROBLEM OF PAIN: these two didn't thrill me, but we each respond to different things. Lewis at least develops these ideas very well and that development was interesting.
THE GREAT DIVORCE: This was my favorite work. Lewis displays once again a keen insight into human nature, set in the backdrop of arriving at Paradise from Purgatory and having to shed their old selves before they are willing to enter Heaven.
A GRIEF OBSERVED: This chronicles the spiritual journey of CS Lewis after his wife's [end of life]. It is very open and honest, and thus very painful to read. Sometimes we benefit by reading of others' trials as well as their triumphs.
THE ABOLITION OF MAN: A fascinating analysis of post-modernism and where it will lead us.
78 internautes sur 83 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
One of the most important books I own 20 juillet 2004
Par bookscdsdvdsandcoolstuff - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Next to my Bible, my copy of the Catechism, my copy of the Didache, and some other writings from the early church, this is the most important book that I own. C.S. Lewis is one of the English speaking world's greatest treasures, and his work is a contribution to all of humanity.
That might sound over the top. But it is simply true. This book contains 1) Mere Christianity, which is adapted from a series of radio shows Lewis did. If this book does not lead you closer to Christ, I don't know what will. 2) The Screwtape Letters, my favorite book by Lewis, which is a satirical look at how the enemy tempts us away from God. 3) The Great Divorce, which is a masterful discussion about the problem of good and evil. 4) The Problem of Pain, an equally excellent look at why a loving God allows suffering. 5) Miracles... I challenge you to read this and remain a cynic. 6) A Grief Observed. Heartrending and helpful for anyone who has suffered. 7) The Abolition of Man, a scary look at where we are headed when we loose our values.
I have read Screwtape several times, and have checked out every other book in this collection at least once. If you are looking for solid, sane philosophy grounded in reason, to help you through your journey, get this book. It is the only MUST own I have ever recommended next to the Bible. (okay, one of two MUST owns. If you are Catholic, you MUST own the Catechism too)
The book itself is beautiful in hardcover, with a partially cloth cover and a ribbon marker. A suitable package for this quality of writing.
123 internautes sur 134 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2007 "rough cut" edition is not well-made, but it's the only game in town 13 novembre 2009
Par Joshua Barr - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
EDIT: In 2009 I originally posted this review as a 1-star review. I stood by the 1-star review not at all because of the content of these books (they are excellent and I enjoy them thoroughly) but only because people tend to look for 1-star reviews as flagging issues exactly like the one I was trying to highlight.

Somewhere recently in the four years since I wrote my review Amazon has finally fixed the product image at least. What you see here should be what you get if you order it. The 2007 roughcut edition is still not well-made, but by now I've come to terms with the fact that it's probably the only edition anyone will be able to find. Since I've only been able to find one copy of the superior 2001 edition in the years since I posted this review I have realized that this review has probably done more harm than good by discouraging others from buying these excellent books because a better edition *used to exist*.

For this reason I will effectively remove my review from the public eye by raising it to 3 stars, where it will be less likely to be seen.

==== Second version of the review ====

EDIT: My original review has been edited and toned down thanks to feedback from Joseph in the comments. Thanks!

IMPORTANT: This review is about the physical product being shipped when you order C. S. Lewis Signature Classics: Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, A Grief Observed, The Problem of Pain, Miracles, and The Great Divorce (Boxed Set). The product being shipped IS NOT THE PRODUCT PICTURED on that page at the time of this writing.

I have the greatest respect for Lewis and his writings, and love every book in this collection. For the content of these volumes: 5/5 stars. You needn't look very far to find many high-quality 5-star reviews of Lewis' work.

However, this physical product is one of the lowest-quality publishing jobs I've ever seen. I don't think HarperCollins (or anyone) should ever try to pass this edition off as the same product as the earlier edition box set depicted in the product pictures. The original 2001 box set has different art, different typesetting, different dimensions, different paper, etc., etc. the list goes on. The original (2001) edition is also far more durable, and ages better. I should know, I have both.

What you *want* is the original edition, but good luck finding it. HarperCollins refers to both the 2001 box set and this newer "rough cut" edition with the same ISBN, so if you search for and believe you've bought the 2001 box set you'll most likely be unpleasantly surprised to receive this inferior version instead.
45 internautes sur 46 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Superb collection 21 octobre 2005
Par FrKurt Messick - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
C.S. Lewis was a rare individual. One of the few non-clerics to be recognised as a theologian by the Anglican church, he put forth the case for Christianity in general in ways that many Christians beyond the Anglican world can accept, and a clear description for non-Christians of what Christian faith and practice should be. Indeed, Lewis says in his introduction that this text (or indeed, hardly any other he produced) will help in deciding between Christian denominations. While he describes himself as a 'very ordinary layman' in the Church of England, he looks to the broader picture of Christianity, particularly for those who have little or no background. The discussion of division points rarely wins a convert, Lewis observed, and so he leaves the issues of ecclesiology and high theology differences to 'experts'. Lewis is of course selling himself short in this regard, but it helps to reinforce his point.

This collection contains several of C.S. Lewis' classic works (although it is not in fact a complete collection of all his writings, not even of all his non-fiction writings). It contains the following works: 'Mere Christianity', 'The Screwtape Letters', 'The Great Divorce', 'The Problem of Pain', 'Miracles', 'A Grief Observed', plus 'The Abolition of Man'. It does provide an excellent survey of Lewis' theology, ethics, and general outlook on life. I will highlight two of the selections that show the different ways Lewis approaches things.

For the first example, the book 'Mere Christianity' looks at beliefs, both from a 'natural' standpoint as well as a scripture/tradition/reason standpoint. Lewis looks both at belief and unbelief - for example, he states that Christians do not have to see other religions of the world as thoroughly wrong; on the other hand, to be an atheist requires (in Lewis' estimation) that one view religions, all religions, as founded on a mistake. Lewis probably surprised his listeners by starting a statement, 'When I was an atheist...' Lewis is a late-comer to Christianity (most Anglicans in England were cradle-Anglicans). Thus Lewis can speak with the authority of one having deliberately chosen and found Christianity, rather than one who by accident of birth never knew any other (although the case can be made that Lewis was certainly raised in a culture dominated by Christendom).

Lewis also looks at practice - here we are not talking about liturgical niceties or even general church-y practices, but rather the broad strokes of Christian practice - issues of morality, forgiveness, charity, hope and faith. Faith actually has two chapters - one in the more common use of system of belief, but the other in a more subtle, spiritual way. Lewis states in the second chapter that should readers get lost, they should just skip the chapter - while many parts of Christianity will be accessible and intelligible to non-Christians, some things cannot be understood from the outside. This is the `leave it to God' sense of faith, that is in many ways more of a gift or grace from God than a skill to be developed.

Finally, Lewis looks at personality, not just in the sense of our individual personality, but our status as persons and of God's own personality. Lewis' conclusion that there is no true personality apart from God's is somewhat disquieting; Lewis contrasts Christianity with itself in saying that it is both easy and hard at the same time. Lewis looks for the `new man' to be a creature in complete submission and abandonment to God. This is a turn both easy and difficult.

'Mere Christianity' was originally a series of radio talks, published as three separate books - 'The Case for Christianity', 'Christian Behaviour', and 'Beyond Personality'. This book brings together all three texts. Lewis' style is witty and engaging, the kind of writing that indeed lives to be read aloud. Lewis debates whether or not it was a good idea to leave the oral-language aspects in the written text (given that the tools for emphasis in written language are different); I think the correct choice was made.

On the other hand, Lewis can write in ways that are intensely personal and reflective. This is true of the book 'A Grief Observed'. This was drawn out of his personal experience with his wife, Joy. C.S. Lewis was a confirmed bachelor (not that he was a 'confirmed bachelor', mind you, just that he had become set enough in his ways over time that he no longer held out the prospect of marriage or relationships). Then, into his comfortable existence, a special woman, Joy Davidson, arrived. They fell in love quickly, and had a brief marriage of only a few years, when Joy died of cancer.

This left Lewis inconsolable.

For his mother had also died of cancer, when he was very young.

Cancer, cancer, cancer!

Lewis goes through a dramatic period of grief, from which he never truly recovers (according to the essayist Chad Walsh, who writes a postscript to Lewis' book). He died a few years later, the same day as the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

However, Lewis takes the wonderful and dramatic step of writing down his grief to share with others. The fits and starts, the anger, the reconciliation, the pain--all is laid bare for the reader to experience. So high a cost for insight is what true spirituality requires. An awful, awe-ful cost and experience.

'Did you know, dear, how much you took away with you when you left? You have stripped me even of my past...'

All that was good paled in comparison to the loss. How can anything be good again? This is such an honest human feeling, that even the past is no longer what is was in relation to the new reality of being alone again.

In the end, Lewis reaches a bit of a reconciliation with his feelings, and with God.

'How wicked it would be, if we could, to call the dead back. She said not to me, but to the chaplain, "I am at peace with God." '

Lewis had a comfortable, routine life that was jolted by love, and then devasted by loss. Through all of this, he took pains to recount what he was going through, that it might not be lost, that it might benefit others, that there might be some small part of his love for Joy that would last forever.

I hope it shall.

This is a wonderful collection.
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