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The Female Quixote (Anglais) Broché – 15 juillet 2011


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Présentation de l'éditeur

Beautiful and independent, Arabella has been brought up in rural seclusion by her widowed father. Devoted to reading French romances, the sheltered young woman imagines all sorts of misadventures that can befall a heroine such as herself. As she makes forays into fashionable society in Bath and London, many scrapes and mortifications ensue - all men seem like predators wishing to ravish her, she mistakes a cross-dressing prostitute for a distressed gentlewoman, and she risks her life by throwing herself into the Thames to avoid a potential seducer. Can Arabella be cured of her romantic delusions? An immediate success when it first appeared in 1752, The Female Quixote is a wonderfully high-spirited parody of the style of Cervantes, and a telling and comic depiction of eighteenth-century English society.

Biographie de l'auteur

Charlotte Lennox (1720 - 1804), American-born English novelist whose work was much admired by leading literary figures of her time, including Samuel Johnson and the novelists Henry Fielding and Samuel Richardson. Lennox's first novel was The Life of Harriot Stuart (1751). The Female Quixote (1752) and Henrietta (1758) followed.Amanda Gilroy and Wil Verhoeven both teach at the University of Groningen, having previously taught at Brown University in the US. Together they have edited Gilbert Imlay's The Emigrants for Penguin Classics and they have also published widely in the area of historical travel writing.


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The Marquis of - for a long Series of Years, was the first and most distinguished Favourite at Court: He held the most honourable Employments under the Crown, disposed of all Places of Profit as he pleased, presided at the Council,2 and in a manner governed the whole Kingdom. Lire la première page
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Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
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21 internautes sur 23 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
An Eighteenth-Century Women's Novel 27 juin 2001
Par fmb - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Charlotte Lennox's heroine, raised in complete seclusion from the world by her misanthropic father, grows up believing that romances (of the chivalric kind already satirized by Cervantes more than a century before in the original Don Quixote)are true histories and that the extravagant behavior of the knights and heroes in such texts is the model for modern (18th century)men. Poor Arabella is doomed to be ridiculous! Her world of romance never was and never will be. But although she makes the most absurd mistakes, she is intelligent and strangely wise much of the time: she ignores fashion, she believes in complete honesty and fidelity, she rejects all accomodations to practical, but base, worldly wisdom. She constructs a world of her own in which women, who in the real world were quite helpless and treated as chattel, hold real power.
It is perhaps unfortunate that Lennox was a bit too much under the influence of Samuel Richardson and Samuel Johnson, both great writers but quite conservative in their views about women and their place in society (firmly under the power of men). The ending of the novel seems rushed and sad. Poor Arabella, so delightfully original throughout most of the novel, is "reformed"--as one of my friends said after reading it, and so "she becomes completely ordinary." If it weren't for the ending, the book would get five stars.
14 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
DO NOT BUY THE GENERAL BOOKS COPY 26 janvier 2010
Par L. Remi - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I bought the copy of this book that was being sold by Amazon and was published by General Books. DON NOT BUY IT!! It was absolutly terrible. I was charged $9.42, when in reality they should have been paying me to read that trash. In the General Books copy there were errors on almost every page. It made it a struggle to read. For example: page 86 "liNI) of the second book" or on page 69 "Ac-corJirgly". Those are just two of the hundreds of errors. If you don't mind the errors then buy that copy; however, if you intend on keeping this book or using it for any type of school assignment, do not buy from General Books.
9 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Book is fine but don't buy the "Seven Treasures" edition 8 novembre 2009
Par Andrew Louis Black - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This is an important book, a pleasure to read. But do NOT buy the Seven Treasures edition. Though it is a few dollars cheaper, it has no introduction, no index, no footnotes. There are many typographical errors - anything Dipthongs come out in weird characters, and there are several mispellings (and this beyond the non-standardized pronunciations; at various points the characters' names are misspelled).

The entire edition looks as though it has been merely cut and pasted from one of the many free online texts onto MSWord, without much of a proofreading. You may as well do the same and avoid paying the 10 bucks + shipping.
6 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Perhaps better for analysis than enjoyment 13 novembre 2010
Par Arthur M. Bullock - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I certainly have no reason to question the importance of "The Female Quixote" as a milestone in the development of the English novel, in particular the branch that led to the works of Jane Austen. The Oxford "World's Classics" edition that I read had an excellent introduction that covered major points regarding its significance, as well as background on Lennox. So the work is without doubt important. The question remains, is it something I would recommend reading for pleasure?

This novel is in essence a one-joke story, a form that sometimes works (the obvious example being Cervantes' original) and usually doesn't. Here, where Arabella's wild assumptions generally lead to rather low-key consequences, the form is not without some amusement, but generally falls well short of hilarity. The French romances that are the targets of lampooning are deservedly quite obscure now, at least in English, so it is essential to have an edition like the Oxford one that supplies copious notes. In fact, I think they may overdo this a bit, but better too much than too little. The structure of the novel also has what can fairly be regarded as defects, such as its abrupt ending. (I won't go into further detail about this, as I'd just be rehashing points raised in previous reviews.) So I'm glad I read this novel, but it isn't something I'm tempted to ever read again.

Personally, I'm no fan of recent trends toward absolute fidelity to the original editions in modern versions. I can live with editions of Austen that preserve her misspellings (although after a while I'm afraid I'm going to start writing "neice"). However, all the capitalized nouns, as if this were German, and proper names in italics in the Oxford "Female Quixote" became somewhat distracting.
6 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
good story 1 avril 2004
Par Alex H - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Alright, let's get it straight, this is an 18th century novel, not 17th, and while it is tedious at times, for the most part it's very charming and often made me laugh.
I understand that the ending is the "triumph of rationalism over idealism and romanticism," but frankly, I was a little disappointed at the abruptness of it. But who am I to criticize? This is an early novel, and the form hadn't quite been perfected yet, so there are a few loose ends and a large digression in book 6, which was the style of the time.
I recommend reading this with Rasselas, in which Johnson claims the realistic novel is as dangerous to youth as Lennox says of the romance in The Female Quixote.
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