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The Lexicon: An Unauthorized Guide to Harry Potter Fiction and Related Materials (Anglais) Relié – 16 janvier 2009


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EUR 131,01 EUR 7,53

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Book by Vander Ark Steve Kearns John Bunker Lisa Waite Hob


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Amazon.com: 33 commentaires
28 internautes sur 34 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Complete but frustrating structure 4 mars 2009
Par Claire M. Johnson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I am an avowed Harry Potter fanatic, and I have been looking forward to this book for ages. It is, well, limited in its application. Given that it's arranged alphabetically (and having flipped through it several times it seems complete enough), it assumes that you know exactly what you're looking for, spelling and all. There is NO index, so if I wanted to look for a spell that, say, wrote reviews for amazon.com, I would be stymied unless I had a vague inkling as to how that spell might be, well, spelled. I had hoped that this book would be an substitute for his exhaustive website, and, unfortunately, it is merely a reference book to his website. In addition to the lack of index (which is THE most frustrating omission), off the top of my head, I can think of several things that should have been included and yet are not (and, I assume, would not run afoul of the JKR legal team): family trees; timelines for the novels; listing of who is in what house, both in the present era and in the previous era; and listing of teachers (past and present). These are just off the top of my head. I still think this book very valuable on one level, but it is NOT even marginally a substitute for his excellent website. An index would have induced me to give it another star.
6 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Useful and delightful tool 13 septembre 2009
Par Joseph Boenzi - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
"The Lexicon" is more than a glossary of Harry Potter terminology. This listing of names, terms, geographical and magical markers offers definitions, descriptions and connections that are magical, even for muggles. Furthermore, the book captures the spirit and sparkle of the Harry Potter series (and canon) in a way that is faithful to J. K. Rowling's creation and the readers' need to plumb the depths of the individual books or the entire saga. Congratulations to the compiler Steve Vander Ark and his associates. Their vision and perseverance have produced good results. "The Lexicon" is a significant resource for those who take J. K. Rowling's writing seriously.
2 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Disappointing, but has its benefits 20 septembre 2009
Par J. E. Meredith - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
{Note: this review may contain spoilers}

Steve Vander Ark's website, the Harry Potter Lexicon, can be an incredibly useful tool at times, though difficult to navigate. The book is much the same way. A wealth of information is contained in this book, but in most cases, unless you know specifically what you are looking for, you may never find it. For example, there is no rhyme or reason as to how spells are placed in this encyclopedia. The most sensible way would be to list the name of the spell in its alphabetical place (for example, Diffindo) and the common name of the spell ("severing charm") in its place. Each should have a note referencing the other ("see also: 'Diffindo'"). This is almost never the case. Sometimes, in fact, the only information listed about a spell is the proper name. Of course, if you didn't know what the proper name was, and simply wanted to find the digging charm used in Deathly Hallows, you would probably never find it, as it is only listed as its proper name.
Another issue with the book is the fact that not all information about the characters is listed. I understand that it would be impossible (and slightly illegal) to write a complete biography of each character, but there are inconsistencies when listing birth and death dates. The disclaimers on the front, back, and inside of the book make mention of the fact that some information was left out- we can assume that the author was not allowed to "spoil" much of the actual series due to the litigation that hounded the publishing of this encyclopedia. When I noticed that several characters who died in the Battle of Hogwarts did not have their death dates listed, I assumed that the author was not allowed to share this information, for fear of spoiling the last book for readers. And yet, other death dates for characters who perished in the final Harry Potter book are listed. There is no reasoning provided for inconsistencies like this.
Finally, the book has several factual, grammatical, and spelling errors. The biggest one I have noticed so far (I am not quite finished reading the book) is that Fred and George Weasley are listed as being born eight months before Charlie Weasley. We all know Charlie is older- and it seems unlikely that Mrs. Weasley would have been able to give birth again that soon, anyway. This is a mistake that a fan should have caught and corrected easily. Alas, here it is, in this book.
The only true benefit I have been able to find so far is that so much extra information (from interviews, chats, etc.) is listed in the books. Information is culled from a variety of canon and non-canon sources, including the Famous Wizard cards, the Daily Prophet newsletters, Rowling herself, interviews, etc. This was most appreciated.
All in all, I'd say that you're either better off sifting through information on the website or getting this book from your local library rather than buying it. Most of the information is available for free online, from the author of this book, and I think that might be preferable to having a disorganized, sometimes sloppily written, unattractive book on my bookshelf.
8 internautes sur 12 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Refreshing Facts and How to Find Them 19 janvier 2009
Par dorcas_meadowes - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Anyone who was ever been immersed in reading the Harry Potter books knows that there are hundreds of characters, dozens of spells, a menagerie of creatures, and zillions of little fanciful details. And that's what you will find in The Lexicon: a refreshing refresher course in the facts of the series.

This is the book for those times when you just can't remember the differences between a "Hover Charm" and "Wingardium Leviosa," or was it "Levicorpus?" Or when you can't recall whether a detail is from one of the Harry Potter movies or from the books. Was that irritating shrunken head in the Azkaban movie based on anything in the books? Yes, believe it or not - only it was in Chamber of Secrets and it didn't speak with a Jamaican accent.

Just paging through the book is a fun walk down memory lane. I had forgotten all about the students falling ill with "Umbridge-itis," or that there was a Beauty specialist with the delightful name of "Madam Primpernelle." And take, for example, the entry about "Dragon Milk Cheese." The writers of the Lexicon take the obvious literal question of how dragons could give milk since they are clearly reptilian and not mammals, and harken back to a seventeenth century term for "strong beer usually reserved for royalty." Baby dragons must burp alot, huh? It sounds as if the cheese would be tasty.

There are hundreds of such examples of scholarship that enrich and reward the reader, such as Latinate root words provided for spells such as "Cave Inimicum" (beware of enemies) and "Protego Horribilis" (shield us from the frightful). I think children would especially find this fun and useful, since none of that is explained in the books, and most kids (or adults) don't have a Latin dictionary lying around the house.

The paperback cover is quite attractive, with medieval lettering and antique burnishing, and the abbreviations for sources are easy to understand. This is a great addition to the Harry Potter bookshelf, whether at home or in a library.
6 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A Classic Reference Work 21 janvier 2009
Par Jeanne Kimsey - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
At last, this valuable reference is in print, and what a gift to the Harry Potter community! Even casual readers who don't bicker over details on fan forums will be pleased to find new meanings and context in the language. The authors, all of whom are super-fans who have spent years researching and cross-referencing this material, were obsessed with details and loved the books. This is the most complete guide to the Harry Potter series written so far, and an instant classic. It's true that the same information about spells, names, and places has been available for years in the online version of the Lexicon, but now in book form it will be available to a new audience. So even if your computer goes viral, your local library shuts down due to lack of money, and you are sent out of town beyond the reach of high-speed cable, this good old-fashioned book will give you the answers you need.
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