undrgrnd Cliquez ici Toys NEWNEEEW nav-sa-clothing-shoes nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos cliquez_ici nav_EasyChoice Cliquez ici Acheter Fire Shop Kindle Paperwhite cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo Bijoux Marsala Bijoux Montres bijoux Fantaisie
Amazon Premium
Commencez à lire The Little Friend sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil


Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Désolé, cet article n'est pas disponible en
Image non disponible pour la
couleur :
Image non disponible

The Little Friend [Format Kindle]

Donna Tartt
3.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (6 commentaires client)

Prix conseillé : EUR 5,31 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 11,58
Prix Kindle : EUR 4,99 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 6,59 (57%)

App de lecture Kindle gratuite Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.

Les clients ayant acheté cet article ont également acheté

Cette fonction d'achat continuera à charger les articles. Pour naviguer hors de ce carrousel, veuillez utiliser votre touche de raccourci d'en-tête pour naviguer vers l'en-tête précédente ou suivante.

Descriptions du produit


For the rest of her life, Charlotte Cleve would blame herself for her son’s death because she had decided to have the Mother’s Day dinner at six in the evening instead of noon, after church, which is when the Cleves usually had it. Dissatisfaction had been expressed by the elder Cleves at the new arrangement; and while this mainly had to do with suspicion of innovation, on principle, Charlotte felt that she should have paid attention to the undercurrent of grumbling, that it had been a slight but ominous warning of what was to come; a warning which, though obscure even in hindsight, was perhaps as good as any we can ever hope to receive in this life.

Though the Cleves loved to recount among themselves even the minor events of their family history–repeating word for word, with stylized narrative and rhetorical interruptions, entire death-bed scenes, or marriage proposals that had occurred a hundred years before–the events of this terrible Mother’s Day were never discussed. They were not discussed even in covert groups of two, brought together by a long car trip or by insomnia in a late-night kitchen; and this was unusual, because these family discussions were how the Cleves made sense of the world. Even the cruelest and most random disasters–the death, by fire, of one of Charlotte’s infant cousins; the hunting accident in which Charlotte’s uncle had died while she was still in grammar school–were constantly rehearsed among them, her grandmother’s gentle voice and her mother’s stern one merging harmoniously with her grandfather’s baritone and the babble of her aunts, and certain ornamental bits, improvised by daring soloists, eagerly seized upon and elaborated by the chorus, until finally, by group effort, they arrived together at a single song; a song which was then memorized, and sung by the entire company again and again, which slowly eroded memory and came to take the place of truth: the angry fireman, failing in his efforts to resuscitate the tiny body, transmuted sweetly into a weeping one; the moping bird dog, puzzled for several weeks by her master’s death, recast as the grief-stricken Queenie of family legend, who searched relentlessly for her beloved throughout the house and howled, inconsolable, in her pen all night; who barked in joyous welcome whenever the dear ghost approached in the yard, a ghost that only she could perceive. “Dogs can see things that we can’t,” Charlotte’s aunt Tat always intoned, on cue, at the proper moment in the story. She was something of a mystic and the ghost was her innovation.

But Robin: their dear little Robs. More than ten years later, his death remained an agony; there was no glossing any detail; its horror was not subject to repair or permutation by any of the narrative devices that the Cleves knew. And–since this willful amnesia had kept Robin’s death from being translated into that sweet old family vernacular which smoothed even the bitterest mysteries into comfortable, comprehensible form–the memory of that day’s events had a chaotic, fragmented quality, bright mirror-shards of nightmare which flared at the smell of wisteria, the creaking of a clothes-line, a certain stormy cast of spring light.

From the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Widely anticipated over the decade since her debut in The Secret History, Tartt's second novel confirms her talent as a superb storyteller, sophisticated observer of human nature and keen appraiser of ethics and morality. If the theme of The Secret History was intellectual arrogance, here it is dangerous innocence. The death of nine-year-old Robin Cleve Dufresnes, found hanging from a tree in his own backyard in Alexandria, Miss., has never been solved. The crime destroyed his family: it turned his mother into a lethargic recluse; his father left town; and the surviving siblings, Allison and Harriet, are now, 12 years later-it is the early '70s-largely being raised by their black maid and a matriarchy of female relatives headed by their domineering grandmother and her three sisters. Although every character is sharply etched, 12-year-old Harriet-smart, stubborn, willful-is as vivid as a torchlight. Like many preadolescents, she's fascinated by secrets. She vows to solve the mystery of her brother's death and unmask the killer, whom she decides, without a shred of evidence, is Danny Ratliff, a member of a degenerate, redneck family of hardened criminals. (The Ratliff brothers are good to their grandmother, however; their solicitude at times lends the novel the antic atmosphere of a Booth cartoon.) Harriet's pursuit of Danny, at first comic, gathers fateful impetus as she and her best friend, Hely, stalk the Ratliffs, and eventually, as the plot attains the suspense level of a thriller, leads her into mortal danger. Harriet learns about betrayal, guilt and loss, and crosses the threshold into an irrevocable knowledge of true evil. If Tartt wandered into melodrama in The Secret History, this time she's achieved perfect control over her material, melding suspense, character study and social background. Her knowledge of Southern ethos-the importance of family, of heritage, of race and class-is central to the plot, as is her take on Southerners' ability to construct a repertoire, veering toward mythology, of tales of the past. The double standard of justice in a racially segregated community is subtly reinforced, and while Tartt's portrait of the maid, Ida Rhew, evokes a stereotype, Tartt adds the dimension of bitter pride to Ida's character. In her first novel, Tartt unveiled a formidable intelligence. The Little Friend flowers with emotional insight, a gift for comedy and a sure sense of pacing. Wisely, this novel eschews a feel-good resolution. What it does provide is an immensely satisfying reading experience.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1714 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 576 pages
  • Editeur : Bloomsbury Paperbacks; Édition : 1 (30 septembre 2011)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B005QBH2Q8
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (6 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°10.160 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  •  Souhaitez-vous faire modifier les images ?

En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

3.5 étoiles sur 5
3.5 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 le sud caniculaire et claustrophobique 18 octobre 2004
Par Pascale C VOIX VINE
Le deuxieme roman de D. Tartt est vraiment une réusite, à limage du précédent. Harriet est une enfant précoce du sud des USA qui cherche à découvrir qui a tué son frère quelques années plus tot, brisant ainsi l'équilibre familial et la santé mentale de sa mère. Sans s'en rendre compte, Harriet et Hely, son meilleur ami, vont se trouver mèlés à une histoire qui les dépasse de beaucoup.
Ce roman m'a fait plonger dans la société du Tennessee, terrassée par la chaleur de l'été, et l'aventure tragique de ces 2 enfants. C'est un roman initiatique qui vous prend et ne vous lâche pas. Tartt sait tout montrer avec un réalisme et une acuité qui font parfois sourire et grincer des dents. Le monde vu par une enfant est loin d'être rose, mais il vaut le coup d'être lu. Un très grand moment.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Signaler un abus
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 On dirait le sud. 24 août 2005
Par Lisa
Un roman qui commence comme un policier, dans une petite ville du sud des USA une petite fille décide de trouver et de punir l'assassin de son frère. Le personnage de Harriet n'est vraiment pas commun, car si cette petite fille n'a rien de sympathique, on s'y attache malgré tout, et on la suit dans ses relations avec la « noblesse » locale à laquelle elle appartient, avec les noirs et particulièrement avec Ida sa « gouvernante » et avec les rednecks. Ce roman est captivant, et regorge de scènes à suspense. La fin laisse un goût d'inachevé, et mériterait presque une suite, et des pistes lancées par l'auteur se révèlent des culs-de-sac - notamment concernant les personnages d'Allyson, de Lasharon et de Pemberton... A la fois trop long (550p) et trop court, puisque rien n'est résolu. J'ai beaucoup aimé la caractérisation complexe, le setting dans le sud, et une analyse pertinente des relations blancs-noirs, avec l'exploration de différents degrés de racisme.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Signaler un abus
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 A novel, maybe, but no story 1 mars 2014
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
If you are looking for an exciting story of two children, unlikely friends, spending their summer finding who murdered the older brother of one of them and taking revenge on him, this is not the book for you. There is no story in this book. When "The Goldfinch" was released, I found out, to my delight, that Dona Tartt had written another book since "The Secret History", and I immediately bought it. What a disappointment! What a letdown! Virtually nothing happens in this book. True, the descriptions of this steamy South, of the dying town of Alexandria parched under the sun, of the boredom of endless summer days, give the novel a lot of atmosphere and you can really feel the heat on your skin - but, apart from that, nothing much happens. In truth, the novel is about Harriet, about the last summer of her childhood, about the dwindling away of her friendship with shallow, sunny Hely, and, as she has a glimpse of how she will be for her whole life, one cannot help feeling sorry for her: unloved, unlovable, unloving.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Signaler un abus
Vous voulez voir plus de commentaires sur cet article ?
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon

Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique