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The Oldest Cuisine in the World - Cooking in Mesopotamia (Anglais) Broché – 15 avril 2004


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Jean Bottéro (1914–2007) was director emeritus of L'École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris. He is the author of many books, several of which have been translated and published by the University of Chicago Press. Teresa Lavender Fagan has translated numerous books for the University of Chicago Press.



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There is nothing more commonplace than eating and drinking. Lire la première page
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11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
great book with some printing mistakes 10 octobre 2009
Par Paolo Benassi - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
The Oldest Cuisine in the World is a fascinating book, presenting the interconnections between food and history in an amazing and clear style.

The book is beautifully printed, but unfortunately it appears that certain information have been omitted, and it is not clear if by mistake or for some other reasons.

For example at page 90 the ideogram for beer is supposed to be indicated on the second line; in fact the text states "highly evocative of the brewery!" and then leaves a space before the next sentence which I suppose should show the ideogram.

Again at page 129 in note 80 the ideograms for mouth and water are shown, but the sentence states "which through progressive stylization became.... (empty space).

I am now researching the original French edition of the book to find out the answer to this puzzle, as the U.S. printer (University of Chicago Press) did not reply to my question.
9 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Culinary historians, take note! 4 août 2008
Par Jacqualyn Saunders - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
This is a wonderful piece of scholarship, with a practical purpose. To my knowledge, this is a group of some of the earliest recipes ever translated. I have Apicius, and have done some of the recipes in it, but this takes culinary history back at least 1000 years earlier, and shows some fascinating parallels with both Middle Eastern/Persian cooking and Chinese. My only regrets or complaints are that we still do not know the translation behind some of the ingredients, which makes it difficult to actually try them, and that the clay tablets were damaged in places, which makes the list of ingredients incomplete in places. But the avenue of research is fascinating, and holds some real interesting keys to later cooking styles.

A must-have if culinary history interests you!
How surprisingly sophisticated! 3 juillet 2014
Par Susanne Morlang - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This is an amazing book. Given the difficulty of researching the subject when there is so little reference material, this author obviously knows cooking! This is translated from the French. Many thanks to the translator as well: I don't read French and I needed to read this.
I'm going to have to try that "recipe" for bread baked right in the ashes of the campfire. My mouth just doesn't understand why that would taste Better than bread baked in an oven! These chefs had names for breads not only made with different grains, or combinations of grains, but also for those breads with different other added ingredients: just as we do today.
That is just one subject. There are many others: meats, pickled foods ......
How varied and surprisingly sophisticated the techniques and recipes of these ancient cooks and chefs were.
Somewhat Unique, Somewhat Incomplete 25 novembre 2013
Par S. Linkletter - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I enjoy this book because it is about the oldest known recorded recipes in the world. It gives some small glimpse into how people were cooking their food back when agriculture was first practiced. The author translated completely only what he personally considered accurately known, and left the rest un-translated. This is responsible scholarly practice. However, I would have liked to have seen the original words, transliterated into our alphabet, for the ingredients he considered accurately known. Perhaps some day someone will publish such a book. Until then, this is the only one that I know of which covers cooking techniques in Ancient Mesopotamia.
3 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A scholarly paper 7 août 2010
Par Maria C. S. Guimaraes - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
A scholarly research paper by a well known scientist on Assyrian history. Very curious and enlightining to find out what an ancient civilization ate and drank. Don't go looking for yummy treats however. Taste buds evolved hugely in 4,500 years.
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