The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus
EUR 17,88
  • Tous les prix incluent la TVA.
En stock.
Expédié et vendu par Amazon.
Emballage cadeau disponible.
Quantité :1
Ajouter au panier
Amazon rachète votre
article EUR 6,26 en chèque-cadeau.
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 2 images

The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories (Anglais) Relié – 8 avril 2014


Voir les 8 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
Relié, 8 avril 2014
EUR 17,88
EUR 10,84 EUR 17,25
Broché
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 11,76
CD, Livre audio
"Veuillez réessayer"

Offres spéciales et liens associés


Les clients ayant acheté cet article ont également acheté



Vendez cet article - Prix de rachat jusqu'à EUR 6,26
Vendez The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays and Stories contre un chèque-cadeau d'une valeur pouvant aller jusqu'à EUR 6,26, que vous pourrez ensuite utiliser sur tout le site Amazon.fr. Les valeurs de rachat peuvent varier (voir les critères d'éligibilité des produits). En savoir plus sur notre programme de reprise Amazon Rachète.

Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 240 pages
  • Editeur : Scribner (8 avril 2014)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 147675361X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1476753614
  • Dimensions du produit: 21,6 x 14,2 x 2,3 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 21.827 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre (En savoir plus)
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Commentaires en ligne 

3.0 étoiles sur 5
5 étoiles
0
4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
1
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
Voir le commentaire client
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Commentaires client les plus utiles

Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Intéressant, plein d'espoir mais à la sortie lecture frustrante. Un génie de demain tristement décédé avant l'heure ne fait pas pour autant un génie aujourd'hui. Recueil de textes rassemblés dans un but louable, pour marquer l'importance qu'aurait pu avoir l'auteur... Puis le titre, beau, tiré d'un texte écrit pour son Université laissait espérer plus de profondeur que le simple fait que l'opposé de la solitude est son... Université.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 125 commentaires
57 internautes sur 64 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Talented young person who needed only to be provided with the right opportunity 8 avril 2014
Par Denis Vukosav - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
‘The Opposite of Loneliness’ is collection of essays and stories written by Marina Keegan, a tragically deceased young person who has gone too soon from this world.

In front of Marina was certainly a great career after she graduated from Yale, supposed to start working at the New Yorker while one of her texts planned to be turned into a play.

Unfortunately, the death was quicker but what is left as her legacy was collected in this interesting collection ‘The Opposite of Loneliness’ which certainly confirms that she was a talented young person who needed only to be provided with the right opportunity.

The collection consists of works that are both fiction and non-fiction while she speaks about various everyday issues - about the life that we live, about relationships that we establish with each other, about our feelings.

However, although her fictional texts are of good quality, far more impressive are her articles and most of all, Marina Keegan’s most known work “The Opposite of Loneliness” after which the collection is named. Precisely when the reader will read this text even more will be affected with the sad fact that this girl full of optimism and hope in life is no longer among us, even though through her text speaks the beauty of life and happiness, everything what is the opposite of loneliness that many people today feel.

Of course that at times the more experienced reader will notice that it is a work that was written by the young and not so experienced person, but in any case her talent in the years that were to follow would surely have brought her far.

Unfortunately, now we can only enjoy what left behind this young girl though I’m strong believer that anyone who likes to read short stories, especially young audience, will enjoy reading Marina’s collection - because of her optimism, desire and youthful vigor that speaks from every page she wrote.
32 internautes sur 37 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
An excellent first book.. and last 10 avril 2014
Par Frank A. Juliano - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
It's poignant enough that this gifted writer died at 22. Such promise. But Keegan writes about death -- her own, the planet's -- and her drive to do something meaningful with her life. It's a beautiful book, astonishingly insightful and ultimately heartbreaking.

But one of Keegan's professors at Yale wrote that "Marina wouldn't want you to read her book because she is dead, but because it is good.'' It is very good. Please read it.
50 internautes sur 61 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Some of the most powerful writing I've seen 8 avril 2014
Par Andy Shuping - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
ARC provided by NetGalley

Writing an honest review for any book can be difficult, but this type of book is especially difficult. Marina was already garnering praise before she graduated: her essay "Opposite of Loneliness" went viral, she graduated magna cum laude from Yale, a job all lined up, things being published...and she died tragically five days after she graduated. It's not the type of book that you want to write and say that you didn't like, for fear of pitchforks and torches and shouts. But, here's the thing...I don't have to write that type of review. Honestly.

This book is many things: a grieving process for the family, a memorial to a friend, and more importantly a powerful monument to a writer that is able to distill the essence of humanity onto paper. The book is composed of several different parts: the introduction essay that the book takes its title from "The Opposite of Loneliness," several of Marina's short stories, and several of her essays. Intermixed in are quotes and snippets from poems that she wrote, although these are not shown in full, at least not in this galley copy. All in all it captures some of the best work of this young writer.

The first quote we see is from Marina's poem Bygones: "Do you wanna leave soon?''No, I want enough time to be in love with everything. And I cry because everything is so beautiful and so short."

The title essay, "The Opposite of Loneliness" went viral after it was published. And you really don't have to stretch to understand why, as its something that many of us can relate to. While it is written about graduating from college, it also applies to the leaving of home, of a comfort zone, of going off into the unknown. And while there have been hundreds of writers that have written about this topic before, Marina's take is different. She states simply, and eloquently, that the feeling of leaving the known is scary. Of walking away from having friends right next door, of structure, and everything taken care of is one of the scariest things possible. And all of these people saying "oh this is the best time of your life, cherish it" makes you afraid of what's to come. But Marina stands up and says, my life isn't over, I'm going to continue to have fun until I'm old. And while there are many things to quote this one "What we have to remember is that we can still do anything. We can change our minds. We can start over." Life isn't over because of moving on, it's just beginning.

While there are several of Marina's stories in the book, they didn't stand out to me as much. Not because they aren't good, but because her essays are that much better. In the essays that are shared, it seems obvious a couple of them are school assignments. The first one is about her first car. Now in the hands of most college students they would write about how awesome and cool the car was, or how stupid it was they were driving the station wagon that had been in the family for 10 years. Probably something with a few laughs, but not memorable. Marina's essay though...is different. Marina doesn't just write about the car, but she connects it to her essence. We learn how the car came to her after her grandfather passed away and her grandmother wanted to only have one car. That when she got the keys for it she and her grandmother drove stopped, listened to an old tape of a favorite artist, and opened the moonroof to look out, and smiled. That the car had the scent of her grandmother's perfume in it for a long time, that it was organized like her with a spare sewing kit and other items, until gradually it became Marina's. The tin foil balls from breakfast biscuits on the way to school on the driver's side door, the dents in the steering wheel from her fingernails after crying because a boy just wanted to be friends, the smells and papers that lived in the car. Until it was time to pass it on to her brother and she wondered if she could recapture the scent of her grandmother's perfume one more time. You can't but help be entrapped by that overwhelming feeling of humanity. She paints a picture with her words and you can see it before you and get swept up in it all.

And her other essays are no less powerful. We read and nod along as she describes growing up and wanting to fit in and she could...except for her diet. Because she needed to be gluten free, before anyone else knew what that meant. And we understand and cringe at the embarrassment she felt as her mom tried to keep her healthy and safe, but made her feel singled out. We understand the constant struggle of wanting to belong, but of having to follow a diet, but balancing the needs of family, but wanting to be normal college girl and not worry about kissing a boy after he drank a beer or ate a pizza. Or in the essay where she writes about beached whales, and the tens of thousands of dollars spent in rescuing them, but we do nothing for the homeless in front of us, but the whales are special, but are fellow humans are right there. Marina makes us proud and sad of our humanity. She captures it so expertly and shows us what we're doing that is so right...and so wrong.

Marina died young and while we may mourn that, we are left with her essays and other writings that have the power to change the world. And while that may be an over used phrase, I think it accurately describes Marina's style. Her ability to capture the very essence of humanity! and to distill it onto paper, to share raw emotions with you via words and make you feel what she does...tis a rare gift and talent. While Marina may be gone, we need to read and reread what she has written and take it to heart. Let it give us chills, fear, hope, anger...whatever emotion it brings to you, let it come.

I highly recommend this book to all readers. 4 out of 5
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Interesting 14 juin 2014
Par fia304 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
These essays are a testament to a talent that was taken away tragically and to soon. You can only imagine what her talent could have produced with age...
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Beautiful and poignant... 11 juillet 2014
Par Larry Hoffer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
I'd rate this 4.5 stars.

I randomly stumbled upon this book, and I'm so glad I did.

Marina Keegan was an aspiring writer who graduated magna cum laude from Yale in May 2012. She was a talented go-getter with a bright future ahead of her, one which included a job at the New Yorker and a play in production. Five days after her graduation, she was killed in a car accident while on her way to visit family.

An essay called "The Opposite of Loneliness," which she wrote for the Yale Daily News, recounted the excitement she felt about graduating from college and heading into her future, yet it was also tinged with the melancholy of the simpler college days, when minor problems seemed so insurmountable. After her death, the essay went viral, and it led to the publication of this book by the same name, a collection of short stories and essays she wrote.

After reading this book, I can say unequivocally that Marina Keegan was an exceptionally talented writer, one whose fiction was imbued with sensitivity and rich characters, and whose essays were insightful, sometimes humorous and sometimes quirky. The essays in which she referred to the thoughts and fears she had about her own future were particularly poignant, because she had no idea just how short her future would sadly be. It's difficult, of course, to separate the emotional weight of her work from the tragedy of her death, but I still believe this pieces would be powerful had she not died.

I particularly enjoyed a number of her short stories, particularly "Cold Pastoral," in which a college student deals with the death of a fellow student she was dating, but isn't really sure what their relationship meant to her; "Winter Break," which told of the difficulties a college student has reconciling her own romantic relationship with the difficulties her parents are having; "Reading Aloud," in which an aging woman reads to a younger blind man and finds unusual emotional catharsis; the perils of returning to your hometown after your life hasn't gone the way you planned, in "Hail, Full of Grace"; and "Challenger Deep," the story of the crew on a doomed submarine.

Of her essays, the ones I enjoyed the most were "Stability in Motion," in which Keegan recounted her relationship with her first car, a gift from her grandmother, and "Against the Grain," which told of her challenges living with Celiac disease, and her mother's fiercely protective nature where those issues were concerned.

Keegan's writing is layered, at times both poetic and humorous, and quite beautiful. The literary world lost a star it never got the chance to have, but luckily her work was left behind for us to savor, and wonder what might have been.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous

Les images de produits des clients

Rechercher


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?