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The Passage: A Novel (Book One of The Passage Trilogy) [Format Kindle]

Justin Cronin
3.9 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (11 commentaires client)

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Wolgast had been to the Compound only once, the previous summer, to meet with Colonel Sykes.  Not a job interview, exactly; it had been made clear to Wolgast that the assignment was his if he wanted it.  A pair of soldiers drove him in a van with blacked out windows, but Wolgast could tell they were taking him west from Denver, into the mountains.   The drive took six hours, and by the time they pulled into the Compound, he’d actually managed to fall asleep.  He stepped from the van into the bright sunshine of a summer afternoon.  He stretched and looked around.   From the topography, he’d have guessed he was somewhere around Telluride.  It could have been further north.  The air felt thin and clean in his lungs; he felt the dull throb of a high-altitude headache at the top of his skull. 

He was met in the parking lot by a civilian, a compact man dressed in jeans and a khaki shirt rolled at the sleeves, a pair of old-fashioned aviators perched on his wide, faintly bulbous nose.  This was Richards.  

“Hope the ride wasn’t too bad,” Richards said as they shook hands.   Up close Wolgast saw that Richards’ cheeks were pockmarked with old acne scars.  “We’re pretty high up here.  If you’re not used to it, you’ll want to take it easy.”

Richards escorted Wolgast across the parking area to a building he called the Chalet, which was exactly what it sounded like: a large Tudor structure, three stories tall, with the exposed timbers of an old-fashioned sportsman’s lodge.  The mountains had once been full of these places, Wolgast knew, hulking relics from an era before time-share condos and modern resorts.  The building faced an open lawn, and beyond, at a hundred yards or so, a cluster of more workaday structures: cinderblock barracks, a half-dozen military inflatables, a low-slung building that resembled a roadside motel.  Military vehicles, Humvees and smaller jeeps and five ton trucks, were moving up and down the drive; in the center of the lawn, a group of men with broad chests and trim haircuts, naked to the waist, were sunning themselves on lawn chairs.  

Stepping into the Chalet, Wolgast had the disorienting sensation of peeking behind a movie set; the place had been gutted to the studs, its original architecture replaced by the neutral textures of a modern office building: gray carpeting, institutional lighting, acoustic tile drop ceilings.  He might have been in a dentist’s office, or the high-rise off the freeway where he met his accountant once a year to do his taxes.  They stopped at the front desk, where Richards asked him to turn over his handheld and his weapon, which he passed to the guard, a kid in cammos, who tagged them. There was an elevator, but Richards walked past it and led Wolgast down a narrow hallway to a heavy metal door that opened on a flight of stairs.  They ascended to the second floor, and made their way down another non-descript hallway to Sykes’ office. 

Sykes rose from behind his desk as they entered: a tall, well-built man in uniform, his chest spangled with the various bars and little bits of color that Wolgast had never understood.  His office was neat as a pin, its arrangement of objects, right down to the framed photos on his desk, giving the impression of having been placed for maximum efficiency.   Resting in the center of the desk was a single manila folder, fat with folded paper.  Wolgast knew it was almost certainly his personnel file, or some version of it.  

They shook hands and Sykes offered him coffee, which Wolgast accepted.  He wasn’t drowsy but the caffeine, he knew, would help the headache.  

“Sorry about the bullshit with the van,” Sykes said, and waved him to a chair.  “That’s just how we do things.”

A soldier brought in the coffee, a plastic carafe and two china cups on a tray.  Richards remained standing behind Sykes’ desk, his back to the broad windows that looked out on the woodlands that ringed the Compound.  Sykes explained what he wanted Wolgast to do.  It was all quite straight forward, he said, and by now Wolgast knew the basics.  The Army needed between ten and twenty death-row inmates to serve in the third-stage trials of an experimental drug therapy, codenamed Project Noah.   In exchange for their consent, these men would have their sentences commuted to life without parole.  It would be Wolgast’s job to obtain the signatures of these men, nothing more.  Everything had been legally vetted, but because the project was a matter of national security, all of these men would be declared legally dead.  Thereafter, they would spend the rest of their lives in the care of the federal penal system, a white-collar prison camp, under assumed identities.  The men would be chosen based upon a number of factors, but all would be men between the ages of twenty and thirty-five with no living first-degree relatives.  Wolgast would report directly to Sykes; he’d have no other contact, though he’d remain, technically, in the employment of the Bureau.  

“Do I have to pick them?”  Wolgast asked.

Sykes shook his head.  “That’s our job.  You’ll get your orders from me.  All you have to do is get their consent.  Once they’re signed on, the Army will take it from there.  They’ll be moved to the nearest federal lock-up, then we’ll transport them here.”

Wolgast thought a moment.   “Colonel, I have to ask--“

“What we’re doing?”  He seemed, at that moment, to permit himself an almost human-looking smile.

Wolgast nodded.  “I understand I can’t be very specific.  But I’m going to be asking them to sign over their whole lives.  I have to tell them something.”

Sykes exchanged a look with Richards, who shrugged.  “I’ll leave you now,” Richards said, and nodded at Wolgast.  “Agent.” 

When Richards had left, Sykes leaned back in his chair.  “I’m not a biochemist, agent.  You’ll have to be satisfied with the layman’s version.  Here’s the background, at least the part I can tell you. About ten years ago, the CDC got a call from a doctor in La Paz.  He had four patients, all Americans, who had come down with what looked like Hantavirus – high fever, vomiting, muscle pain, headache, hypoxemia.  The four of them had been part of an eco-tour, deep in the jungle.  They claimed that they were part of a group of fourteen but had gotten separated from the others and had been wandering in the jungle for weeks.  It was sheer luck that they’d stumbled onto a remote trading post run by a bunch of Franciscan friars, who arranged their transport to La Paz.  Now, Hanta isn’t the common cold, but it’s not exactly rare, either, so none of this would have been more than a blip on the CDC’s radar if not for one thing.  All of them were terminal cancer patients.  The tour was organized by an organization called ‘Last Wish.’  You’ve heard of them?”

Wolgast nodded.  “I thought they just took people skydiving, things like that.”

 “That’s what I thought, too.  But apparently not.  Of the four, one had an inoperable brain tumor, two had acute lymphocytic leukemia, and the fourth had ovarian cancer.  And every single one of them became well.  Not just the Hanta, or whatever it was.  No cancer.  Not a trace.”

Wolgast felt lost.   “I don’t get it.”

Sykes sipped his coffee.  “Well, neither did anyone at the CDC.   But something had happened, some interaction between their immune systems and something, most likely viral, that they’d been exposed to in the jungle.  Something they ate?  The water they drank?   No one could figure it out.  They couldn’t even say exactly where they’d been.”  He leaned forward over his desk.  “Do you know what the thymus gland is?”

Wolgast shook his head.

Sykes pointed at his chest, just above the breastbone.  “Little thing in here, between the sternum and the trachea, about the size of an acorn.  In most people, it’s atrophied completely by puberty, and you could go your whole life not knowing you had one, unless it was diseased.  Nobody really knows what it does, or at least they didn’t, until they ran scans on these four patients.  The thymus had somehow turned itself back on.  More than back on: it had enlarged to three times its usual size.  It looked like a malignancy but it wasn’t.  And their immune systems had gone into overdrive.  A hugely accelerated rate of cellular regeneration.  And there were other benefits.  Remember these were cancer patients, all over fifty.  It was like they were teenagers again.  Smell, hearing, vision, skin tone, lung volume, physical strength and endurance, even sexual function.  One of the men actually grew back a full head of hair.”

“A virus did this?’

Sykes nodded.  “Like I said, this is the layman’s version.  But I’ve got people downstairs who think that’s exactly what happened.  Some of them have degrees in subjects I can’t even spell.  They talk to me like I’m a child, and they’re not wrong.”

“What happened to them?  The four patients.”

Sykes leaned back in his chair, his face darkening a little.

Revue de presse

 “Cronin has given us what could be the best book of the summer. Don't wait to dive into The Passage.”—USA Today

“Cronin’s unguessable plot and appealing characters will seize your heart and mind.”—Parade

“Great storytelling … vital, tender, and compelling” – O, The Oprah Magazine

“A blockbuster…astutely plotted and imaginative”—The New York Times Book Review

“Cronin gets it just right; the combination of attentive realism and doomsday stakes makes for a mesmerizing experience.”—Salon.com

“We’ve just found our summer escape!”—Elle, “Top 10 Summer Books for 2010”

“Magnificently unnerving…A The Stand-meets-The Road journey.”—Entertainment Weekly, A-

“Addictive, terrifying, and deeply satisfying. Not only is this one of the year's best thrillers; it's one of the best of the past decade - maybe one of the best ever."—Men’s Journal

“A literary richness that rivals Stephen King’s The Stand.”—Time

“Fans of vampire fiction who are bored by the endless hordes of sensitive, misunderstood Byronesque bloodsuckers will revel in Cronin’s engrossingly horrific account of a postapocalyptic American overrun by the gruesome reality behind the wish-fulfillment fantasies…manages to engage the reader with a sweeping epic style.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review and “Pick of the week”)

“Literary author Cronin turns in an apocalyptic thriller in the spirit of Stephen King or Michael Crichton....The young girl as heroine and role model is a nice touch.”—Kirkus

“[An] apocalyptic epic…Expect a lot of interest in this title.” —Booklist

“The monsters in this compulsive nail biter are the scariest in fiction since Stephen King's vampires in Salem's Lot...This exceptional thriller should be one of the most popular novels this year and will draw in readers everywhere.”–Library Journal, starred review  

“Meet what is likely to be one of the biggest blockbusters of the summer.”—People

“Imagine Michael Crichton crossbreeding Stephen King’s “The Stand” and “Salem’s Lot” in that lab on Jurassic Park, with rich infusions of Robert McCammon’s “Swan Song,” “Battlestar Galactica” and even Cormac McCarthy’s “The Road.””
The Washington Post

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3.9 étoiles sur 5
3.9 étoiles sur 5
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27 internautes sur 27 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Une vraie claque dans la figure ! 31 mars 2011
Par Piment coloré TOP 500 COMMENTATEURS
J'ai acheté 'The Passage' en lisant juste les premières lignes du livre, et en parcourant à peine le résumé.
Que dire ? Il y a dix livres dans ce livre, dix styles de narration différents, on a peur pour les personnages, on craint de tourner la page, c'est terriblement humain, on y croit dur comme fer. Je ne veux pas gâcher la surprise des futurs lecteurs, fermez les yeux, achetez-le, et entrez dans la danse - pour donner plus de précisions, même si le livre est classé dans les histoires de "vampires", ce n'est pas véritablement le cas. Une expérience militaire sur des prisonniers condamnés à mort dérape, et transforme ces cobayes en monstruosités qui sont assimilées par les populations à des vampires, mais juste par analogie. La réalité est plus complexe. J'ai lu les Anne Rice, Bram Stoker, et le Matheson "The survivor", mais ça n'a rien à voir, ici, point de crucifix et de gousses d'ail... Au milieu du livre, on change d'univers, mais pas d'histoire, c'est un peu plus lent, mais pour monter crescendo vers la conclusion de l'histoire, qui ne s'achève pas tout-à-fait à la fin, on espère une suite très vivement: la dernière phrase est un mystère, et une claque dans la figure. Bref, une longue lecture délicieuse et dure, haletante et lente, un univers à lui tout seul.

Je viens d'apprendre que 2 suites sont prévues, * The Twelve (16 mai 2012, je l'ai précommandé) et * The City of Mirrors (2014), je n'en peux déjà plus d'attendre !
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Magnifique 16 septembre 2011
Action et suspense du début à la fin ... les pages défilent, les années aussi et le suspense et l'action sont omniprésents.
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 The Book of the Apocalypse 11 avril 2013
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
A dystopian, horror, anticipatory, 'vampire' ('viral') nightmare...
The story line is not new; an unlawful, if not illegal government experiment gone wrong, a plague unleashed on the world, the subsequent quasi-annihilation of humanity... Everything leading up to it is painstakingly described - and that's probably what singles Justin Cronin out and makes this book 'literature' just as much as Frankenstein or Dracula. But it's a tad painful. To say the least, Justin Cronin TAKES HIS TIME. Everything could be said and done much faster, but the pace is slow, thorough, enveloping many characters and bringing them along, leaving almost no one behind, while you, dear reader, are jumping on the edge of your seat, literally inhaling the book and feeling your gut twist with fear and dread. Of COURSE you know what's coming, but you have no idea who will be sacrificed on the altar of madness, and in what way. There are clues from the start; Amy is defined as the Girl who Lived a Thousand Years, for instance in the very first sentence. How? Why?
So well, the world is destroyed in 20mn, but many pages lead up to it.
Cue Part 2. A small group of California survivors, a hundred years later, hanging to their lives by their fingernails and century-old machines that are giving their dying breath. Cronin is a master at creating tension, again. The machines are failing, viral-induced madness is being sown in the community, the attacks both viciously ineluctably fatal in their physical form, and howlingly terrifying when they take the Trojan form of possession. The world is wholly infected, there is nowhere to go and the Colony is about to fall.
I have to admit that when books reach a certain point of hopelessness I stop reading them because I feel I am being marched to the scaffold.
Lire la suite ›
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Une bonne surprise 22 juin 2014
Par agathe
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Si le concept de base (virus / immortalité / créatures / humanité en danger) n'est pas follement original, la narration est accrocheuse (différents points de vue / différentes époques d'un chapitre à l'autre) et les personnages sont travaillés en profondeur, ce qui fait durer le mystère et rend l'histoire intéressante. Pour les amateurs du genre, c'est un livre qui se lit vite et bien, bref une friandise !
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 un best seller qui déménage ! 21 janvier 2015
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Je suis toujours méfiante avec les livres phénomènes, j'ai toujours la crainte de voir débarquer un énième twillight....
Mais non, ouf, rien à voir, même s'il y a des sortes de vampires dans le Passage (et d'autres ingrédients très classiques, comme l'expérience militaire qui tourne mal), il s'agit d'un vrai roman de SF post ap, le 1er d'une trilogie.
Il y a a beaucoup de personnage (qui ne survivent pas tous), et plusieurs époques, de ce fait on suit plusieurs histoires en parallèle, qui finissent bien sûr par se rejoindre. Toutes sont intéressantes, certaines sont carrément passionnantes.
L'univers décrit est super crédible, les méchants font très très peurs, le malaise et une sensation d'enfermement s'installent. Le désespoir des personnages déchire le cœur. Puis, une petite note d'espoir surgit....mais rien n'est tout blanc ou tout noir, et on ne sait pas si cet espoir conduira à une rédemption, ou à la fin du monde.

C'est tout bonnement saisissant.
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