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The Perfect Scoop: Ice Creams, Sorbets, Granitas, and Sweet Accompaniments [Anglais] [Broché]

David Lebovitz
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Descriptions du produit

Extrait


BASICS


Whether you’re a novice or a highly experienced cook, you will find it’s easy to make the freshest, most unbelievably tasty ice creams, sorbets, sherbets, and granitas in your own kitchen. If you’ve never done it before, prepare to be wowed. Nothing beats the taste of freshly made ice cream spooned directly from the machine.

In this chapter you’ll find all the information you’ll need to do it. Starting with step-by-step instructions for making the perfect ice cream custard, I’ll take you through the process--including some pitfalls to avoid and steps to take in case you manage to fall into one of them. The best ingredients and the right equipment are crucial to making really perfect ice creams and sorbets. I’ll give you advice to help you make your choices, including information about the differences among various models of ice cream makers, if you don’t have one yet.


Making the Perfect Ice Cream Custard

Many of the ice cream recipes in this book are custard-based, or French-style ice creams. Others are Philadelphia-style, which refers to ice cream made simply by mixing milk or cream with sugar and other ingredients. French-style ice creams tend to be richer and smoother, due to the emulsifying properties of egg yolks. My fruit-based ice creams tend to be Philadelphia-style, since I prefer to let the flavor of the fruits come forward without all the richness. But in some cases I offer a flavor in both styles, so you can decide which you prefer.

If you’ve never made a French-style stovetop ice cream custard before, follow these step-by-step instructions to ensure success (in some recipes, the procedure may vary slightly). Although I make my custards in a saucepan over moderate heat, you may wish to cook your custard in a double boiler the first few times or use a flame tamer to diffuse the heat, until you get the hang of it. It will take longer to cook, but you’ll appreciate the extra time to watch and make sure it cooks to just the right consistency.

Before getting started, prepare an ice bath to expedite the chilling of the custard. Make one by putting some ice in a large bowl and then adding a cup or two of cold water so the ice cubes are barely floating. You can also partially fill an empty sink with ice and some water. Most custard-based ice cream recipes call for pouring the warm, just-cooked custard right into the cream, which helps stop the cooking and expedites cooling. Set the bowl of cream in the ice bath, put a strainer over the top and make sure to keep it nearby; after you’ve cooked the custard, you’ll need to pour it into the bowl right away.

Heat the milk or the liquid called for in the recipe with the sugar in a medium-sized saucepan on the stove. Always use nonreactive cookware, such as stainless steel or anodized aluminum.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg yolks.

The next step is to temper the yolks. Here’s where you need to be careful. Once the milk is hot and steamy, slowly and gradually pour the milk into the egg yolks (1), whisking constantly, which keeps the yolks moving and avoids the risk of cooking them into little eggy bits. I find it best to remove the saucepan from the heat and use a ladle to add the hot liquid while whisking. If you add the hot liquid too fast or don’t whisk the egg yolks briskly, they’ll cook and you’ll end up with bits of scrambled eggs.

Scrape the warmed egg yolks back into the saucepan. Then stir the custard over moderate heat, using a heatproof utensil with a flat edge. I like to use a silicone rubber spatula, although a straight-edged wooden spatula works well too. Cook, stirring nonstop, until the mixture thickens and coats the spatula. While cooking the custard, be sure to scrape the bottom of the saucepan while stirring. Don’t be timid; keep the custard mixture moving constantly while it’s cooking, and do not let the custard boil!


Custard Rescue

If your custard does boil or curdle, you can rescue it by blending it while it’s warm with an immersion or standing blender. Don’t fill a blender container more than half full with hot liquid since the steam will expand inside and can force off the lid. Ouch.

You’ll know your custard’s done when it begins to steam and you feel it just beginning to cook as you scrape the spatula across the bottom of the pan. You can test it by running your finger across the spatula coated with custard: It’s done when your finger leaves a definite trail that doesn’t flow back together (2). You can check for doneness with an instant-read thermometer too; it should read between 170°F (77°C) and 175°F (79°C) when the custard is done. Egg safety experts recommend cooking eggs to a minimum temperature of 160°F (71°C), but don’t let them get above 185°F (85°C) or you’ll have scrambled eggs.

It’s ready! Without delay, take the custard off the heat and immediately pour the hot mixture through the strainer into the chilled bowl of cream in its ice bath, and stir (3). This will lower the temperature of the custard right away to stop the cooking (4). Stir frequently to help the custard cool down. Once it’s cool, refrigerate the custard with the lid slightly ajar. It should be very cold before churning it. I recommend chilling most mixtures for at least 8 hours or overnight.

Chill the machine in advance. If you’re using an ice cream maker that requires prefreezing, make sure the canister spends the required amount of time in the freezer--whatever’s recommended by the manufacturer. Although it may feel frozen to the touch before the recommended time, take it from me: If you use the machine prematurely you’ll end up watching the mixture go round and round without freezing--a big disappointment. Don’t cheat! Most machines require 24 hours of prefreezing.

Some machines work best if you switch them on and get the dasher (the turning blade) moving before pouring in your mixture, since on some models the custard will begin freezing to the sides immediately when you pour it in, which can prevent the dasher from turning.

Although some experts say that most ice cream benefits from being allowed to “ripen” in the freezer for a few hours before serving, they can wait patiently for their rock-hard ice cream to ripen; I’m happy to enjoy the soft, freshly frozen stuff right from the machine as well. If your ice cream has been in the freezer for a long time, it will most likely benefit from being taken out 5 to 10 minutes prior to serving to allow it to soften to the best texture.

Keep It Clean and Play It Safe

Ice cream is a dairy product, so it’s important to keep things as clean and hygienic as possible. Make sure all equipment is sparkling clean. Wash your hands after handling raw eggs, and clean the washable parts of your ice cream maker in very hot water (or as indicated by the manufacturer) after each use. Chill custards with eggs and dairy products promptly, and store them in the refrigerator.

All of the ice cream recipes in this book that require egg yolks are cooked as custards on the stovetop. If you have concerns about egg safety, use an instant-read thermometer to check the temperature. Most harmful bacteria don’t survive at temperatures higher than 160°F (71°C). Pasteurized eggs in their shells are available in some areas and can be used if you wish.


INGREDIENTS

Alcohol

Alcohol does two things in ice cream: it prevents ice creams and sorbets from freezing too hard (alcohol doesn’t freeze), and it provides flavor. In some recipes you can omit it if you’ll be serving kids or anyone who is avoiding alcohol. In other cases it’s a vital flavor component, as in the Prune-Armagnac Ice Cream (page 78).

I frequently use kirsch, a distillation of cherries, to heighten the flavors of many fruit- or berry-based frozen desserts without interfering with the fresh fruit flavors. A few drops can transform a ho-hum fruit purée into something vibrant.

When buying liquor for cooking, my rule is to get a brand that you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own, but you don’t need to buy the most expensive bottle.

How Can I Make Softer Ice Cream and Sorbets?

Adding a bit of alcohol will give your ice creams and sorbets a better texture, since alcohol doesn’t freeze. For fruit-based recipes, spirits like kirsch, vodka, gin, and eau-de-vie will enhance the flavor and produce a softer texture by preventing ice crystals from forming. Use caution, though: If you add too much, the mixture might not freeze at all, and you’ll be left with a runny mess. In general, you can add up to 3 tablespoons (45 ml) of 40 percent (80 proof) liquor, such as rum or whiskey, to 1 quart (1 liter) of custard or sorbet mixture without any problems. I do push the limits with my boozy Eggnog Ice Cream (page 58).


Berries

Fresh berries are seasonal and should be used only when they’re at their peak. I’ve never tasted a “fresh” berry that had been flown around the world that wasn’t flavorless or bitter, so I never use them. I do use frozen berries, which can be quite tasty if you find a good brand, and they’re generally less expensive than fresh berries. If buying frozen, choose berries that are unsweetened and individually quick frozen (IQF), rather than the sweetened ones packed like blocks of ice. When measuring frozen berries for recipes, be sure to measure them while they’re frozen, since as they defrost they decrease substantially in volume.

Fresh berries should be plump and juicy when you buy them. Strawberries should be very fragrant and uniformly red, with no green “shoulders” or dark bruises. Peek under berry baskets ...

Revue de presse

"The original ice cream tour de force."
—Cookbooker.com, paperback edition review, 6/2/10

"Here is the rare book in which the recipes live up to the delicious promise of their names . . . The collection of ice creams ranges from the sophisticated to the delightfully childish."
—New York Daily News

Amazon 2007 Top 10 Editor's Picks in Cooking, Food & Wine
"The Perfect Scoop digs right into what you need to know for successful ice creams, sherbets, gelatos, sorbets, frozen yogurts, and granitas."
—New York Times

"Having churned out ice cream at home and in professional kitchens for a quarter century, Lebovitz can guide even a beginner to a great frozen experience. . . . Truly the Good Humor man of home ice cream."
—San Francisco Chronicle

One of the best gift books of the year: "The scoop in the title is perfect, and so is everything else about this cookbook on homemade ice cream. It's informative, full of charm, and loaded with irresistible and impeccably tested recipes."
—Seattle Post-Intelligencer

"Everything you need to know about making anything remotely connected with ice cream . . . Lebovitz is an entertaining read . . . the recipe headnotes alone are worth the price of the book."
—Oregonian

"Packed with beautiful photos and great-sounding recipes."
—Omaha World-Herald

"If you are one of those people who‚ 'scream for ice cream,' then you will whoop for The Perfect Scoop. . . Ice cream aficionados should be delighted with The Perfect Scoop. It is delicious."
—Peter Franklin's Cookbook Nook, United Press Syndicate

"The author's 25 years of experience as a frozen-dessert maker are put to excellent use in this wittily written, detailed volume. . . . Great photos and plenty of practical advice combine to make this an appealing and useful resource for the dessert aficionado."
—Publishers Weekly

"If you love cold sweets but never dared own an ice-cream machine for fear you'd soon weigh 300 pounds, then consider this book; you may just find some happy compromises."
—Epicurious.com
 
"This is the only book you'll ever need to make stellar ice cream."
—Gale Gand, host of Food Network's Sweet Dreams

"Finally, someone has done real justice to my favorite food, ice cream. David's book is full of new ideas for cold delights and great takes on my favorite chocolate treats."
—John Scharffenberger, cofounder of Scharffen Berger Chocolate Maker and author of Essence of Chocolate

"I screamed, you'll scream—we all scream for David's wonderful ice cream! I highly recommend this book for all ice cream junkies."
—Sherry Yard, pastry chef at Spago and author of The Secrets of Baking

"The Perfect Scoop is luscious and perfectly luxurious—even David's accompaniments and accessories ('mix-ins' and 'vessels' as he calls them) sparkle sweetly."
—Lisa Yockelson, author of Baking by Flavor and ChocolateChocolate


From the Hardcover edition.

Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 256 pages
  • Editeur : Ten Speed Press (4 mai 2010)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 158008219X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580082198
  • Dimensions du produit: 26,9 x 18,5 x 1,8 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (5 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 35.732 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  • Table des matières complète
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 There goes my waisteline! 12 janvier 2013
Par Francisca
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
I have reviewed a few ice cream books but I have the idea that this one is the best of all! Still I am also happy with the other books I reviewed as each, even the two very simple ones come with some very good recipes! What I do now that I have both, The Perfect Scoop: Ice Creams, Sorbets, Granitas and Sweet Accompaniments and Ices: The Definitive Guide is that I compare the recipes they both have in common and choose the one that appeals most to me. And recipes I find appealing use less sugar something I think that David Lebovitz takes good care of! I have no interest in eating an ice cream with almost more sugar than fruit and which only makes me very thirsty! I have just finished reading this book and marking the recipes I want to make (which is most of them!) but so far I have tried the Cranberry-Orange Sorbet which is very tasty but due to the fact that cranberries are very difficult to find where I live I might not make it very often. Also, although it has a truly beautiful color and a very good taste no one would guess that it is made with cranberries. I added Grand Marnier, as David suggests and which makes the sorbet more scoopable and served it in the Lemon-Poppy Seed Cookie Cups (only I changed the lemon for orange as the first time I made it I found the lemony flavour a bit strong. I got the recipe totally wrong the first time so I ended up breaking it into pieces and eating them. The second time it all looked a lot better but this is a recipe with a lot of fat. Next time I might make a recipe I made once which is quite similar but doesn't include the almonds or the poppy seeds as I think that it was less fat. Lire la suite ›
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 THE single ice cream book to buy 31 juillet 2012
Par Henri IV
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
I recently bought a sorbetier, as well as a number of ice cream/sorbet/gelato recipe books. This is the best--the chocolate ice cream is absolutely to die for...better than any commercial brand I've ever had. The recipes are clear and easy to follow, providing good basic recipes that can be modified at will. Each recipe is preceded by the author's thoughts and comments, well written and relevant. The book is also visually attractive. The first reviewer notes that, unfortunately, it is in English--but one learns quickly to read recipes in another language. Great book!
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 la bible des glaces 1 mars 2010
Par Dominguez
Format:Relié
Indispensable si on possède une sorbetière. Enfin un livre qui propose des vrais recettes de glaces et sorbets très originales totalement faites maison. Seule bémol, il faut maitriser un minimum l'anglais, ou se faire aider par un traducteur pour les mots basics.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Great book ! 25 mai 2013
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Very complete with many suggestions. Easy to understand and to apply. For non American cooks: note that measures (cups) and some ingredients are typically american.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Unbelievable customer service 6 mars 2013
Par Joanne
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
I'm writing this in English on the French site, as the items I bought were in English, so I reckon that anyone else thinking of buying them will understand English. This is really a comment on the customer service provided by my favourite online shop. Shortly after ordering this book, I discovered that the same title on Amazon.co.uk was a British English version, as opposed to American English. Being British myself, I find it easier to follow British recipes for the measures and certain ingredients. So, I've just contacted Amazon.fr to tell them I wish to return this edition. I was fully expecting to have to pay postage, as the error was all mine. Not only do I not have to pay postage, but they've told me not to bother returning the book. They'll just refund me.
I've only flicked through the book in case Amazon changes its mind, but the recipes sound wonderful.
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