The Rain Before it Falls et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus
  • Tous les prix incluent la TVA.
Habituellement expédié sous 1 à 2 mois.
Expédié et vendu par Amazon.
Emballage cadeau disponible.
Quantité :1
The Rain Before it Falls a été ajouté à votre Panier
+ EUR 2,99 (livraison)
D'occasion: Bon | Détails
Vendu par BetterWorldBooksFr
État: D'occasion: Bon
Commentaire: Expedié du Royaume-Uni. Ancien livre de bibliothèque. Quelques signes d'usage, et marques à l'intérieur possibles. Sous garantie de remboursement complet. Votre achat aide a lutter contre l'analphabetisme dans le monde.
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 2 images

The Rain Before it Falls (Anglais) Broché – 5 juin 2008


Voir les 12 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
Broché
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 13,10
EUR 13,10 EUR 0,01
EUR 13,10 Livraison à EUR 0,01. Habituellement expédié sous 1 à 2 mois. Expédié et vendu par Amazon. Emballage cadeau disponible.

Produits fréquemment achetés ensemble

The Rain Before it Falls + The House of Sleep
Prix pour les deux : EUR 26,47

Acheter les articles sélectionnés ensemble

Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Number three: the caravan.

I have not yet described Warden Farm–the house itself–in any detail, but I think I will talk about the caravan first. It was one of the first things that Beatrix showed me in the garden, and it quickly became the place where we would retreat and hide together. You could say that everything started from there.

Aunt Ivy gave me this photograph herself, I remember, at the end of my time living at her house. It was one of her few real acts of kindness. Beneath her warm and welcoming exterior, she turned out to be a rather distant, unapproachable woman. She and her husband had built for themselves an active and comfortable life, which revolved mainly around hunting and shooting and all the associated social activities which came with them. She was a busy organizer of hunt balls, tennis-club suppers and the like. Also, she doted on her two sons, athletic and sturdy boys–good-natured, too, but not very well endowed in the brains department, it seems to me in retrospect. None of these things, at any rate, made her inclined to expend much of her attention on me–the unwanted guest, the evacuee–or indeed on her daughter, Beatrix. Therein lay the seeds of the problem. Neglected and resentful, Beatrix seized upon me as soon as I arrived, knowing that in me she had found someone in an even more vulnerable position than her own, someone it would be easy to enlist as her devoted follower. She showed me kindness and she showed me attention: these things were enough to win my loyalty, and indeed I have never forgotten them even to this day, however selfish her motives might have been at the time.

The house was large, and full of places we might have made our own: unvisited, secret places. But in Beatrix’s mind–though I did not understand this until later–it was “their” place, it belonged to the family by whom she felt so rejected, and so she chose somewhere else, somewhere quite separate, as the place where she and I should pursue our friendship. That was why we spent so much of our time, during those early days and weeks, in the caravan.

Let me see, now. The caravan itself is half-obscured, in this picture, by overhanging trees. It had been placed, for some reason, in one of the most remote corners of the grounds, and left there for many years. This photograph captures it just as I remember it: eerie, neglected, the woodwork starting to rot and the metalwork corroding into rust. It was tiny, as this image confirms. The shape, I think, is referred to as “teardrop”: that is to say, the rear end is rounded, describing a small, elegant curve, while the front seems to have been chopped off, and is entirely flat. It’s a curious shape: in effect, the caravan looks as though it is only half there. The trees hanging over its roof and trailing fingers down the walls are some kind of birch, I believe. The caravan had been placed on the outskirts of a wood: in fact the dividing line between this wood–presumably common land–and the furthest reaches of Uncle Owen’s property was difficult to determine. A more modern caravan might have had a picture window at the front; this one, I see, had only two small windows, very high up, and a similar window at the side. No surprise, then, that it was always dark inside. The door was solid and dark, and made of wood, like the whole of the bottom half of the caravan–even the towbar. That’s an odd feature, isn’t it?–but I’m sure that I am right. It rested on four wooden legs, and always sat closer to the ground than it should have done, because both the tyres were flat. The windows were filthy, too, and the whole thing gave the appearance of having been abandoned and fallen into irreversible decay. But to a child, of course, that simply made it all the more attractive. I can only imagine that Ivy and Owen had bought it many years ago–in the 1920s, perhaps, when they were first married–and had stopped using it as soon as they had children. Inside there were only two bunks, so it would have been quite useless for family holidays.

How many weeks was it, I wonder, before Beatrix and I set up camp there together? Or was it only a matter of days? They say that split seconds and aeons become interchangeable when you experience intense emotion, and after my arrival at Warden Farm I was soon feeling a sense of loneliness and homesickness which I find it impossible to describe. I was beside myself with unhappiness. I would sob quite openly in front of Ivy and Owen–at the supper table, for instance–but never once, to my knowledge, did they think of telephoning my parents to tell them how miserable I was. My distress was simply ignored, by them, by the two boys–by everybody, in short, apart from the cook (who was a kindly soul), and of course by Beatrix. Even she was cruel to me at first. And yet I do think that when she finally took me under her wing, it was because she felt sorry for me, not simply because I was weaker than her, and easy to manipulate. She was lonely, too, remember, and she needed a friend. Beatrix could be a selfish person, at times, there is no doubt about that: I was to see it proved again and again over the following years and decades. But at the same time she was quite capable of love. Rather more than capable of it, I should say: she was vulnerable to it–that would be a better word–deeply, fatally vulnerable. And certainly, I think, during my time at the farm, she came to love me. In her way.

Her way of loving me, in fact, was to try to help me. And her first attempt to help me involved our drawing up a ludicrous plan–a desperate plan–which we resolved to carry out together. We decided that we were going to escape.

During the long afternoons, the lawn stretched out, billiard green, at the front of the house. A narrow, gravelled drive cut through it, but no cars ever used this drive. Almost nobody used the front door at all: only the children–and Beatrix and I especially. It was the back door where the men came to do their business, and so it was the back door that was watched. The cook watched it, from her kitchen, and Ivy watched it, from her bedroom, and Uncle Owen watched it, from his tiny, benighted study. There could be no escape that way. Even at dusk it would be risky–and it was at dusk that we had decided to leave.

That afternoon, sitting alone beneath the low roof, the crazy angles of my bedroom, while Beatrix was downstairs, taking food from the kitchen, waiting until the cook’s back was turned, I thought once more of my own mother and father, at home in Birmingham, going about their ordinary lives. My father riding to work on his bicycle, a gas mask slung over his shoulder. My mother pinning out washing on the line in the back garden, just a few yards from the entrance to the air-raid shelter. These things, I knew, had something to do with danger, with the danger I had been brought here to escape from, the danger that they lived within, now, every minute of every day. And all I could think was that it was not fair. I wanted to share in that danger. It frightened me, yes, but nowhere near as much as this absence, nowhere near as much.

That evening, we waited until the house was quiet, until Ivy and Owen had settled down to a drink after dinner, and the boys had gone upstairs to play, and then we put on our coats and pulled back the heavy latch on the front door and we slipped outside.

She was eleven years old. I was eight. I would have followed her anywhere.

There was a thick dampness in the air, somewhere between mist and rain. The rising moon was three-quarters full, but screened by clouds. There was no birdsong. Even the sheep had fallen silent. We made no noise as we stepped out on to the grass.

Still wearing our school shoes, we scurried over the spongey moistness of the front lawn. We jumped down, over the ha-ha and on to the lower level of the garden, and made for the overgrown gap in the hedge, the opening that led to the secret path; the path that led to the secret place.

She ran ahead; I followed. Her grey school mackintosh, appearing and disappearing between the leaves.

At the end of the path was a clearing, tangled and overgrown with hanging branches and trailing ivy, and within this clearing was the caravan. The cold gripped you the moment you opened the door and stepped inside. The net curtains hung grey and filthy over the windows, ragged with moth holes, blackened with the corpses of flies. There was a small table which folded out from the wall, and two bench seats on either side of it. Nowhere else to sit down. A kettle on the stove, but the gas cylinder was long since empty. From the farmhouse, Beatrix had carried with her a brown bottle, a cork wedged loosely at the top, filled to the brim with cloudy lemonade, and over the last few days, she had been hiding further provisions here. A half-loaf of bread, solid as masonry. A wedge of cheese, Shropshire blue, crusty at the edges. Two apples from the orchard. And three biscuits, shortbread, baked by the cook, and filched from the biscuit tin in the larder at the risk of God knows what dreadful punishment.

“Let’s eat some of this now,” she said; and we set to it, quietly and with great deliberation. I had not been able to eat much dinner and was hungry now even though my stomach was so tightened with fearful anticipation that I could barely force the food down.

There were a few items of cutlery still in one of the drawers, and Beatrix used a fruit knife to cut the bread and the cheese. When we had finished eating, without saying another word, she took my hand, turned it palm upward, and drew the blade of the knife along my tiny forefinger. I cried out, and hot salt tears sprang up in my eyes. But she took no notice. Calmly, she did the same to herself and then pressed her finger against mine, so that the two pools of blood mingled and coalesced.

“There,” she said. “... --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

Revue de presse

A hauntingly melancholy tale of love and loss...a moving exploration of the inheritance of unhappiness, and the devestating consequences it can have for future generations (Daily Mail )

Potent and melancholy, like a short, sad song (The Guardian )

A male writer who can enter such traditionally female territory and aquit himself with such aplomb (The Sunday Telegraph )


Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 288 pages
  • Editeur : Penguin (5 juin 2008)
  • Collection : PGVI: LIT FIC
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0141033215
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141033211
  • Dimensions du produit: 12,9 x 1,8 x 19,8 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.9 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (12 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 10.598 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Né en 1961, à Birmingham, en Angleterre, Jonathan Coe a fait ses études à Trinity College à Cambridge. Il a écrit des articles pour le Guardian, la London Review of Books, le Times Literary Supplement...
Il a reçu le prix Femina Étranger en 1995 pour son quatrième roman, Testament à l'anglaise et le prix Médicis Étranger en 1998 pour La Maison du sommeil.

Dans ce livre (En savoir plus)
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

3.9 étoiles sur 5

Commentaires client les plus utiles

20 internautes sur 20 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Danielle Esposito TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURSVOIX VINE le 4 février 2009
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Après avoir lu the Winshaw Legacy (ou What a Cave up!) puis"The Rotter's Club" et sa suite "the Closed Circle", livres éminemment caustiques et politiques bien que par ailleurs très humains aussi dans la mesure où les personnages y sont très attachants, j'ai été ravie de découvrir un autre aspect de Jonathan Coe. Dans "The Rain Before it falls", c'est l'amour et la compassion qui l'emportent, alors que le thème principal du récit est paradoxalement le manque d'amour.
Ce qui est également remarquable est la forme du roman, la technique narrative, le choix de raconter la vie des personnages par la description d'une succession de photos de famille que fait le personnage principal, Rosamond, une femme dont on se sent tout de suite incroyablement proche tant elle est vraie.
C'est un roman qu'on ne peut laisser de côté une fois qu'on l'a commencé. Superbe!
Enfin, on ne peut être qu'admirative devant le talent de Coe dont tous les personnages ici sont des femmes.
Un écrivain qui peut se mettre ainsi dans la peau d'une femme, de plusieurs femmes en fait, sans que jamais on ne sente que c'est un homme qui a écrit le roman est un écrivain qui connaît vraiment l'âme humaine. Un grand écrivain
1 commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Bear le 12 mars 2009
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
D'une femme à l'autre, toutes reliés par un lien familial, des tragédies ordinaires . Que ce soit dans les années de la seconde guerre mondiale, dans les années 60, ou de nos jours, ces jeunes et moins jeunes femmes(tante, filles, nièces, petites filles) ont un point commun: le manque d'amour de leur mère, elle-même mal aimée etc....Le "truc" utilisé par l'auteur (à partir de photos évocatrices) est habile, mais le récit en est rendu trop linéaire, et les personnages manquent de consistance.Cela reste cependant un livre à lire.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Ausseres le 6 avril 2009
Format: Broché
un climat lourd de secrets qui, dans une construction littéraire originale, se révèlent au fur et à mesure de scènes d'une intense sensibilité ; la psychologie féminine et les tabous socio-culturels sont évoqués de manière subtile et nuancée dans un style sobre qui ne fait qu'accroître l'émotion sans tomber dans le pathos ; et c'est elle qui demeure lorsque la dernière page es tournée (avec regret)
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par La revue littéraire des copines le 9 février 2010
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
J'ai découvert Jonahtan Coe avec la Maison du sommeil et le Testament à l'anglaise que j'avais tous deux trouvés fantastiques, j'ai été moins impressionnée par les autres.

Avec La Pluie, avant qu'elle tombe, il n'arrive pas à renouveler le genre. Comme dans le Testament, à l'anglaise, on est dans le registre de la saga familiale : Une grande tante décède seule dans sa maison en laissant derrière elle une série d'enregistrements à l'attention d'une mystérieuse femme que l'on n'arrive pas à retrouver. On va alors se décider à écouter les cassettes. Il y a peu d'hommes dans cette histoire, c'est une histoire de femmes. Des femmes, pour la plupart de la même famille, de différentes générations et cette histoire nous raconte les relations qui les lient et les conséquences qui en découlent.

Cependant, contrairement au Testament à l'anglaise et à la Maison du sommeil dans lesquels les situations étaient attendues, mais jamais de la façon dont on les attendait, dans ce roman, on s'y attend et puis on n'est pas surpris. Il n'y a pas non plus là une fin en feu d'artifice délirant.

Bref, même si la lecture de ce livre n'est pas désagréable, on est loin de ce que l'on aurait pu attendre d'un écrivain comme Jonathan Coe.

Lecture possible
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Pascale C VOIX VINE le 29 mai 2010
Format: Broché
Je n'avais jamais rien lu de J. Coe, mais ce livre va être le début d'une longue série de lectures. C'est la vie d'une famille, narrée par une vieille dame au soir de sa vie, à travers la description de 20 photos de famille. Le vingtième siècle est ainsi passé en revue au fil du récit de la vie d'une poignée de personnes et surtout de l'explication des liens qui les unissent. En dire trop ne serait pas rendre service à cette histoire de femmes si bien écrite par un homme, pleine de sensibilité, de tristesse et d'amour. Je l'ai lu en 2 jours, et ça a été un régal de la première à la dernière page.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par N. Van Espen le 20 avril 2012
Format: Broché
au moins, dans ses interviews, jonathan coe a-t-il eu l'idée de signaler que son livre était un hommage à rosamond lehmann - j'ai lu "the ballad and the source" et ce roman de coe "the rain before in falls" est pratiquement un copié/collé du roman de cette grande dame de la littérature britannique
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?