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The Sea and Civilization: A Maritime History of the World (Anglais) Relié – Séquence inédite, 29 octobre 2013


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Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 784 pages
  • Editeur : Knopf (29 octobre 2013)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 140004409X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400044092
  • Dimensions du produit: 24,4 x 18,1 x 4,7 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 84.111 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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Format: Relié
I like to collect books on how commodities such as salt, cinnamon, cochineal, and indigo were developed in transported from one location to another. However we need to keep in mind that these products even though might have inspired maritime travel it is secondary to those of the people that actually did the traveling.

Lincoln Paine in "The Sea and Civilization" shows how waterways contributed to spreading many of the great cultures of mankind. One of the main parts of the book are the maps. I have a fair knowledge of where things are in the world of today and the world of antiquity. But without a clear picture the names of places are just that the names of places. So pay close attention to the maps in the book will be even more interesting.

The whole book is interesting but if I had to pick a favorite spot it would be the chapter on "The British Global Trade" once again I find it interesting looking at the maps. Conspicuously missing is the Piri Reis map.

There is an extensive bibliography and enough notes to know that Lincoln Paine knows his maritime history. We can also use the bibliography for further reading. Still this book is so compact with information that you will have to probably reread it to remember the small pieces of information that can easily be overlooked.

Green cargoes
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 43 commentaires
39 internautes sur 43 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A very good book, on too great a topic. 26 août 2013
Par Patrick McCormack - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
Certain topics yield essays that wander along the interests of the author, within the scope of the topic. A history of the Sea and Civilization is basically a survey course, and a large plum tree ripe with fruit for the picking. Regardless of the number of pages, the author is central in what he chooses to write about, and what stays by the shore and never sets sail.

This is a good book. It is well written, a compelling read. The review of the history of the sea is a review of men who go down to the sea in ships. The battles, and the explorers, are here. In some ways, this book re-creates some of Daniel Boorstin's book, the explorers, and in some ways it touches on the course of human history.

The author uses the design of boats, and the ways of navigation, as an entry point for talking about peoples and water. At some points, the focus seems to be on small boating -- canoes, reed mats... and even when we move to Egypt and boats on the Nile, the scope is more boating than it is oceans and power. I did like the way the ocean currents explain strategies of exploration, and the archaeology of the expansion of peoples.

The book opens up into discussions of trade routes, and the projection of might and empire through control of oceans.

One thing I love about this book: the author is aware of, and often shows, every single rock carving, pot, or wall image of an ancient ship ever known to man. He is an encyclopedia of the archaeology of ships. He is learned, and an omnivore.

I had recently read "The Great Sea: A Human History of the Mediterranean" by David Abulafia, and enjoyed the length and breadth of that work, while feeling that it grew tired in the telling. Here, with more to write about, I feel this book occasionally gets sketchy, in some of the Pacific chapters, and that the author has perhaps too grand a theme. The feel is more of a survey of human history, rather than a grand theme of human development through the sea.

Yet the swing is hard, even if the result is a double. I thought that the viewing of human civilization through the lens of the sea is a real, although note complete way to look at matters. Why not civilization and rivers, that old chestnut of geography classes? Civilization and the littoral would cover most of human history. The answer is the mystery of the sea, the magic of the sea, which provides a lens for this book, albeit not an entirely satisfactory historical lens.

In short, this is less of a Maritime History of the World, and is rather better described as a History of the Maritime World. And a pretty good one.
19 internautes sur 21 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Mankind's Courageous Venture Across Water 29 septembre 2013
Par Michael P. Lefand - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
Man had to take to the water. He is a mobile being that has always moved from place to place seeking food, new land, fleeing aggressors or oppression, looking to trade, or simply curious about what lay over the horizon. From logs, bark, and animal hide, early man noticed that things float.

With great detail Lincoln Paine describes the development of ocean and river travel. From the raft of primitive man as he escapes the shackles of land, down to nuclear-powered ships, the reader follows the quest of opening up new horizons of trade and the cultures they nourished.

This extraordinary comprehensive narrative, packed into a little over 700 pages, did appear overwhelming, but once started I became absorbed in the story of mankind's need and desire to travel across water. The more I read the more I wanted to know and found it hard to put down. This volume will find a place on the shelf with my other history books and will more than likely be used as reference as I continue my lifetime study of history.

I recommend "The Sea and Civilization" to everyone interested in history because so much of civilization has depended on the sea and travel by water. I give it 5 stars.
16 internautes sur 18 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
"By the Sea, By the Sea, By the Beautiful Sea" - Harold R. Atteridge 3 novembre 2013
Par bernie - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
I like to collect books on how commodities such as salt, cinnamon, cochineal, and indigo were developed in transported from one location to another. However we need to keep in mind that these products even though might have inspired maritime travel it is secondary to those of the people that actually did the traveling.

Lincoln Paine in "The Sea and Civilization" shows how waterways contributed to spreading many of the great cultures of mankind. One of the main parts of the book are the maps. I have a fair knowledge of where things are in the world of today and the world of antiquity. But without a clear picture the names of places are just that the names of places. So pay close attention to the maps in the book will be even more interesting.

The whole book is interesting but if I had to pick a favorite spot it would be the chapter on "The British Global Trade" once again I find it interesting looking at the maps. Conspicuously missing is the Piri Reis map.

There is an extensive bibliography and enough notes to know that Lincoln Paine knows his maritime history. We can also use the bibliography for further reading. Still this book is so compact with information that you will have to probably reread it to remember the small pieces of information that can easily be overlooked.

Green cargoes
16 internautes sur 19 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A view from the boat 5 novembre 2013
Par Personne - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
Most world histories are centered on the movements of armies, the building of cities, the taming of the land. The sea is at best an incidental part of all that. A few noteworthy events may stick in the reader's mind--the battles of Midway, Trafalgar and the loss of the Spanish Armada--but most of the course of history is land-based. Lincoln Paine changes the vantage point. Traffic on seas, lakes and rivers has equally as much to do with the spread of human civilization. This densely-packed volume begins roughly in the Old Kingdom of Egypt and brings us all the way to the present day.

I was about a hundred pages in when it dawned on me that this is really a textbook--whatever the author's intentions might be. It's a compendium of dates, kings and ship architectures. It wants to be read with a notepad on the side and a highlighter in hand; discussions to follow. The style tends toward the dry: it's impossible to do a quick read-through and then circle back for detail. Comparisons with a truly great naval writer (Samuel Eliot Morison) are not favorable in that regard. I would love to see a reduced version of this book with a more general audience in mind. As fascinating as this material is, it's really hard to stay with it. Reading and absorbing is a commitment of many weeks.

So let's consider this as a textbook. As such it's excellent. I can't imagine any serious naval officer not spending a semester with it. It could still benefit from a greater sense of concurrency, since many of the activities happen simultaneously. For example, the last centuries of Ptolemaic Egypt are concurrent with the expansion of river traffic in China. Both economies grew from navigable rivers. I'd love to have seen comparison and contrast. At the very least, a graphic timeline would be quite a plus.

I'm not sure that this is a book for the general reader in history. The material is fascinating, but a little too dense for a quick chapter before bedtime. It's an important topic nonetheless. I'd love to see it spawn a summary volume.
21 internautes sur 28 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Who, What, Where, When....But Not Much Why 19 septembre 2013
Par Andy in Washington - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
What you think of this book is really determined by how you like your history presented. If you like a chronology of events, very detailed and complete, you will fall in love with Lincoln Paine's masterwork. But if you want your history a little more spoon-fed, with the author helping you to draw conclusions and connections, it will be a long and tedious read. I fall more into the second category, thus the 3-stars.

=== The Good Stuff ===

* This is about as complete and well researched book as you will find. I was reading a review copy, with the footnotes still not complete, so it was a bit tough to match up the references and bibliography, but the one or two that I did check were very complete and reputable sources. If you ever wanted to cram the history of civilization into 600 pages, this is about as close as anyone will ever get.

* I love the premise of the book, namely that you should look at the history of maritime technology and navigation, and then work to fit the rest of history into place around it. It is somewhat of a novel concept, but makes for an interesting way to look at things. For example, one of the first chapters examines the flow of metal ores around the area of the middle east. As copper and tin ores are loaded onto boats and shipped across some distances, the bronze age really comes into its own.

* Occasionally, Paine takes a break from the detailed chronology and branches off into a discussion of technology (usually maritime technology) and examines how it came into existence and what effect it had on civilization. I found these passages to be excellent and the best parts of the book. I wish Paine would write a book with just this format (he may have, I will be checking).

=== The Not-So-Good Stuff ===

* I found the book to be a tedious read. While Paine writes in a reasonably easy-to-read style, he is prone to long paragraphs, something I have always disliked. I didn't really do a count, but 300 and 400 word paragraphs seems fairly common.

* The major issue I had with the book was the format. The vast majority of the book is a recitation of facts and events. Paine is incredibly thorough, and he will describe a series of events in incredible detail. It makes for a marvelous historical record, but it is a format that I find makes it tough to absorb much information. I much prefer a more interconnected approach- A and B happen, and therefore C occurs, which naturally leads to an increased emphasis on D, which leads to E. Instead, Paine tends to telling where and when A-E happened, but leaving the reader to draw his own connections and conclusions.

=== Summary ===

Depending on your tastes in history, you may or may not like this book. I have certainly seen few books that were more complete, better researched, or more comprehensive in their looks at history. The emphasis on the history of maritime history as a driver of the rest of history is interesting and a novel approach that caught my interest.

However, my personal taste is for more of a narrative, putting events together in a logical (rather than purely chronological) sequence, and explaining how and why things happened based on previous events.

Even if you are unable to power your way to reading the whole volume, it certainly stands on its own as a decent reference book.
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