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The Silk Code (Anglais) Poche – 8 novembre 2000


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Book by Levinson Paul


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My novel The Silk Code won the Locus Award for Best First Nove1 of 1999, and was published as an "author's cut" Kindle edition in 2012. My other science fiction and mystery novels include Borrowed Tides (2001), The Consciousness Plague (2002), The Pixel Eye (2003), and The Plot To Save Socrates (2006; author's cut Kindle 2012), which Entertainment Weekly called "challenging fun". My short stories have been nominated for Nebula, Hugo, Edgar, and Sturgeon Awards. Nine nonfiction books, including The Soft Edge (1997), Digital McLuhan (1999), Realspace (2003), Cellphone (2004), and New New Media (2009, 2nd edition 2012) have been the subject of major articles in the New York Times, Wired, the Christian Science Monitor, and have been translated into Chinese, Japanese, and eight other languages. I appear from time to time on MSNBC, Fox News ("The O'Reilly Factor"), NPR, BBC Radio and other TV and radio programs - I like talking just as much as writing. I'm also a songwriter, and have been in several bands over the years - one had two records out on Atlantic Records in 1960s. My 1972 album Twice Upon a Rhyme (on HappySad Records) was re-issued on CD by Beatball/Big Pink Records in 2009, and on re-pressed vinyl by Whiplash/Sound of Salvation Records in 2010. I was listed in The Chronicle of Higher Education's "Top 10 Academic Twitterers" in 2009, and review the best of television on my Infinitte Regress.tv blog. Last but not least: I have a PhD in Media Theory from New York University and am Professor of Communication & Media Studies at Fordham University in New York City.

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27 internautes sur 30 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
This is a cool book. 15 décembre 1999
Par Kate Savage - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I found The Silk Code to be wonderful. I had just finished reading Patricia Cornwell's "Black Notice" and had been disappointed. A pinch of enthusiasm is worth a pound of technique. This was a real treat and had exactly what I had been looking for. It blends mystery and science fiction perfectly. One of the most pleasant aspects of the book was that it clear the author was excited to be writing it and that excitement really shines through. The plot was well thought out, creative and unique. I found the characters to be very believable. I never had any interest in the Neanderthals before, but found myself intrigued enough to watch a Discovery Channel special on them. I always have shelf space for books that expand my interests. The fact that people either love or hate it speaks to its originality. I hope that there will be sequel or at least more offerings from Dr. Levinson.
11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Delightful diversion from new science fiction novelist 20 janvier 2002
Par Jennifer Juday - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Poche
I am always delighted to find a new science fiction author. There are simply not enough of them being published these days to suit me. I found "The Silk Code" in an airport bookstore, where the science fiction pickings were very slim, and was delightfully surprised. This one came with recommendations from Stanley Schmidt and Connie Willis, so I had to give it a try.
Levinson is still new at writing novels, and it occasionally shows. I sometimes wanted a section to move faster, and occasionally felt that the dialog dragged a bit. Overall, it was was too interesting to put down. The annoyance of an extra-long morning in the airport and an aching back disappeared by the end of Part One, and it kept me engrossed until the very end.
"The Silk Code" is is a solid first novel, and I very much hope to see more from Paul Levinson.
17 internautes sur 20 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Nice premise, painful writing 14 décembre 2001
Par Bob Carpenter - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Poche
The premise of Paul Levinson's "The Silk Code", subcultures exploiting low tech but high science genetics through the ages, provides more than enough interesting material around which to tell just about any kind of story. But, like so many other first-time science fiction novelists, Levinson writes in first person and never shows you something when the main character can think it instead. Sometimes even that's too much: "A soft, pervasive light engaged us as we walked inside---keener than flourescent, more diffuse than incandescent, a cross between sepiatone and starlight maybe, but impossible to describe with any real precision if you hadn't actually seen it, felt its photons slide through your pupils like pieces of a breeze." (p. 35, paperback). Levinson seems to take the "science" part of "science-fiction" a little too literally. The dialog isn't any better, and is often indistinguishable from a character thinking to himself: " 'Ah, we come full circle--this is where I came in. Alas, we unfortunately are not the only people on this earth who understand more of the power of nature than is admitted by your technological world. You have plastics used for good. You also have plastics used for evil---you have semtex, which blew up your airplane over Scotland.' " (p. 38)
Levinson spends far too many paragraphs with the main characters simply wondering what'll happen next, summarizing what's already happened, and stating the obvious. Read the sample from Amazon, it might be all you can stand.
11 internautes sur 12 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Compelling Mystery 26 janvier 2000
Par Sherry Briggs - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
In The Silk Code, Paul Levinson has crafted a mystery that reaches back to the dawn of humanity for answers to an intriguing mystery. Investigation of sudden death brings anomolies to light, and it's up to Phil D'Amato to find the facts as he reaches into unexpected areas and finds startling answers. One of the things I enjoyed most was spending time with a variety of people who were both interesting and delightful. As a history buff, I appreciated Levinson's invitation to speculate about events in our earliest prehistory. Good read, generous spirit. Enjoy!
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
intellectually intriguing mixed-genre story 31 mars 2003
Par abt1950 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Judging from the previous reviews, this is a book you either love or hate. I happened to like it very much, although I can understand why others might not. The book has its flaws (what do you expect from a first novel?), but its intellectual strength carries the narrative.
The Silk Code" is a novel of ideas masquerading as a cross between science fiction and police procedural. Levinson takes current thinking on genetics, speculation on the relationship between homo sapiens and Neanderthals, and archaeologic discoveries on the Tarim Basin in China and then mixes them with a little bit of Amish culture, virology, and Basque history. At times the mix gets a bit out of control, but overall it coheres fairly well, certainly better than some conspiracy theory novels I've read. The idea of moth genes in the human genome is not as far-fetched as some readers have suggested--it's already known that viral and bacterial sequences make up part of our genome and that we share some genes with other animals.
The weaknesses in "The Silk Code" are a direct result of the book's focus on ideas and its origin as a short story. The characters are wooden, especially in the modern sections of the book. They have a tendency to make brief appearances and then vanish. There were times when the narrative was too sketchy, and I wished that Levinson had gone into more detail. Who, for example, was Amanda really? How did the Amish get involved in an ancient conspiracy? There are enough loose ends and unexplored backstory here for a sequel, although I don't know if Levinson intends to write one.
At any rate, if you're looking for a novel heavy on character development and world building, this probably isn't the book for you. However, if you care more about the speculative elements of the plot, it might be more to your liking.
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