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The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance (Anglais) Broché – 29 avril 2014

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Broché, 29 avril 2014
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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

“I can’t remember a book that has fascinated, educated—and provoked—me as much as The Sports Gene. Epstein has changed forever the way we measure elite athletes and their achievements.”—Malcom Gladwell

“Clear, vivid, and thought-provoking writing that cuts through science anxiety for rank-and-file sports fans.”

Bonnie Ford, Senior Writer, ESPN


“Many researchers and writers are reluctant to tackle genetic issues because they fear the quicksand of racial and ethnic stereotyping. To his credit, Epstein does not flinch.”

The Washington Post 


“Epstein’s rigour in seeking answers and insights is as impressive as the air miles he must have accumulated . . . his book is dazzling and illuminating.”

The Guardian


“Few will put down this deliciously contrarian exploration of great athletic feats.”
Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)


“The narrative follows Mr. Epstein’s search for the roots of elite sport performance as he encounters characters and stories so engrossing that readers may not realize they’re receiving an advanced course in genetics, physiology, and sports medicine.”

Christie AschwandenThe New York Times 

“An important book . . . The Sports Gene is bound to put the cat among the pigeons in the blank-slate crowd who think that we can all be equal as long as we equalize environmental inputs such as practice.”

Michael Shermer, The Wall Street Journal


“This is the book I’ve been waiting for since the early 1960s. I can’t imagine that anyone interested in sports—particularly the fascinating question, ‘How do the best athletes become the best?’—will be any less enthralled than I.”

Amby Burfoot, (1968 Boston Marathon Champion), Runner's World 
 

“A must-read for athletes, parents, coaches, and anyone who wants to know what it takes to be great.”

George Dohrmann, author of Play Their Hearts Out

Présentation de l'éditeur

The New York Times bestseller – with a new afterword about early specialization in youth sports.

The debate is as old as physical competition. Are stars like Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps, and Serena Williams genetic freaks put on Earth to dominate their respective sports? Or are they simply normal people who overcame their biological limits through sheer force of will and obsessive training?


In this controversial and engaging exploration of athletic success and the so-called 10,000-hour rule, David Epstein tackles the great nature vs. nurture debate and traces how far science has come in solving it. Through on-the-ground reporting from below the equator and above the Arctic Circle, revealing conversations with leading scientists and Olympic champions, and interviews with athletes who have rare genetic mutations or physical traits, Epstein forces us to rethink the very nature of athleticism.

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Format: Relié
*A full executive summary of this book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, August 20, 2013.

What does it take to become an elite athlete? The intuitive answer for most of us is that it probably takes some lucky genes on the one hand, and a whole heck of a lot of hard work on the other. Specifically, that we may need to be blessed with a particular body type to excel at a particular sport or discipline (after all, elite marathon runners tend to look far different from elite NFL running backs, who in turn tend to look far different from elite swimmers), but that beyond this it is practice and diligence that paves the way to success. When we look at the science, though--as sports writer David Epstein does in his new book The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance--we find that the story is much more complicated than this. In general terms we find that nature and nurture interact at every step of the way in the development of an elite athlete, and that biology plays far more of a role (and in far more ways) than we may have expected.

To begin with, when it comes to physiology, we find that biology does indeed have a large role to play in influencing our height and skeletal structure (as we would expect), but that biology also influences physiology in many other ways that are important when it comes to elite sports.
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Enorme boulot. Le débat "Inné ou Acquis ?" est bien posé, mis à jour par les découvertes récentes en génétique pour les nuls, illustré par une masse d'anecdotes et faits passionnants. De nombreux éléments critiques qui mettent en cause les nombreux mythes du sport (le don pur contre l'entraînement acharné, les foyers de talents, l'attraction des sports rémunérateurs, ...).
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Tres interessant! Malgré quelques termes assez technique sur le sport en anglais, les etudes scientifiques sont racontees de façon tres simples, jadore
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x99a627b0) étoiles sur 5 389 commentaires
118 internautes sur 127 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x99aaef18) étoiles sur 5 The Science Behind Elite Athletic Performance 5 août 2013
Par Book Shark - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance by David Epstein

"The Sports Gene" is an enjoyable book that shares the latest of modern genetic research as it relates to elite athleticism. In the never-ending quest to settle the debate of nature versus nature, David Epstein takes the readers on a journey into sports and tries to answer how much does each contribute. This fascinating 352-page book includes the following sixteen chapters: 1. Beat by an Underhand Girl: The Gene-Free Model of Expertise, 2. A Tale of Two High Jumpers: (Or: 10,000 Hours Plus or Minus 10,000 Hours), 3. Major League Vision and the Greatest Child Athlete Sample Ever: The Hardware and Software Paradigm, 4. Why Men Have Nipples, 5. The Talent of Trainability, 6. Superbaby, Bully Whippets, and the Trainability of Muscle, 7. The Big Bang of Body Types, 8. The Vitruvian NBA Player, 9. We Are All Black (Sort Of): Race and Genetic Diversity, 10. The Warrior-Slave Theory of Jamaican Sprinting, 11. Malaria and Muscle Fibers, 12. Can Every Kalenjin Run?, 13. The World's Greatest Accidental (Altitudinous) Talent Sieve, 14. Sled Dogs, Ultrarunners, and Couch Potato Genes, 15. The Heartbreak Gene: Death, Injury, and Pain on the Field, and 16 The Gold Medal Mutation.

Positives:
1. Well-written, well-researched book. Epstein is very engaging and keeps the science at a very accessible level.
2. Fascinating topic that sports fans will enjoy. A look at elite athleticism through the eyes of science. Sports elites. I'm there!
3. Epstein does a fantastic job of skillfully handling the very sensitive topic of race and genetics. Any minor miscue and it would have derailed the book but Epstein never lets that happen and should be commended for his utmost care.
4. There are very few books on this interesting topic and this one covers multiple sports. And behind it all is the quest to find what's behind elite athleticism, "The question for scientists is: What accounts for that variance, practice, genes, or something else?"
5. You are guaranteed to learn something new. As an avid sports fan and reader, I didn't expect to learn too many new facts but I am always humbled and pleasantly surprised when I do.
6. The importance of experience in athletics. "Studies that track the eye movements of experienced performers, whether chess players, pianists, surgeons, or athletes, have found that as experts gain experience they are quicker to sift through visual information and separate the wheat from the chaff."
7. Golfers will pick up a valuable scientific tip...I'm not going to spoil it here.
8. The 10,000 hours rule in perspective. "Studies of athletes have tended to find that the top competitors require far less than 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to reach elite status. According to the scientific literature, the average sport-specific practice hours to reach the international levels in basketball, field hockey, and wrestling are closer to 4,000, 4,000, and 6,000, respectively."
9. Understanding the importance behind visual acuity and its importance in sports like baseball. "Coincidentally, or perhaps not, twenty-nine often is the age at which visual acuity starts to deteriorate and the age when hitters, as a group, begin to decline."
10. Important lessons shared, "To this day," Woods said in 2000, "my dad has never asked me to go play golf. I ask him. It's the child's desire to play that matters, not the parent's desire to have the child play."
11. Addressing the differences in gender. "Much of sexual differentiation comes down to a single gene on the Y chromosome: the SRY gene, or "sex determining region Y" gene. Insofar as there is an "athleticism gene," the SRY gene is it." Great stuff!
12. So who was the greatest high-school athlete of all time according to ESPN? Find out.
13. The impact of the Human Genome Project as it relates to sports. The naturally fit six...
14. The science behind muscle growth. "Something that myostatin does signals muscles to cease growing. They had discovered the genetic version of a muscle stop sign. In the absence of myostatin, muscle growth explodes." A lot of good information here.
15. Discusses physical traits by sport that give the athletes innate advantages over the competition. "The height of a sprinter is often critical to his best event. The world's top competitors in the 60-meter sprint are almost always shorter than those in the 100-, 200-, and 400-meter sprints, because shorter legs and lower mass are advantageous for acceleration."
16. A cool look at the NBA. My favorite team of all time, the 95-96 Chicago Bulls (Jordan, Pippen and Rodman). Some eye-opening facts concerning wingspan.
17. Scientific observations, "Low-latitude Africans and Australian Aborigines had the proportionally longest legs and shortest torsos. So this is not strictly about ethnicity so much as geography."
18. Race and genetic diversity. "Kidd's work, along with that of other geneticists, archaeologists, and paleontologists, supports the "recent African origin" model--that essentially every modern human outside of Africa can trace his or her ancestry to a single population that resided in sub-Saharan East Africa as recently as ninety thousand years ago." Honestly, where would we be without understanding the grand theory of evolution? An excellent chapter, worth the price of the book.
19. Mind-blowing facts, " In an example particularly relevant to sports, about 10 percent of people with European ancestry have two copies of a gene variant that allows them to dope with impunity." Wow!
20. An interesting look at Jamaican sprinting and Kenyan long-term running. What's behind the success? "Consider this: seventeen American men in history have run a marathon faster than 2:10 (or a 4:58 per mile pace); thirty-two Kalenjin men did it just in October 2011." Say what?
21. The honest limitations of the young science of genetics, "Just as it is tough to find genes for height--even though we know they exist--it is extraordinarily difficult to pin down genes for even one physiological factor involved in running, let alone all of them."
22. Is motivation genetic? Interesting.
23. Genetic diseases. "According to statistics that Maron has compiled, at least one high school, college, or pro athlete with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) will drop dead somewhere in the United States every other week."
24. An excellent epilogue on the perfect athlete, "In reality, any case for sports expertise that leans entirely on either nature or nurture is a straw-man argument."
25. Notes and selected citations included.

Negatives:
1. Football is the most popular sports in America bar none but wasn't really given as much paper as I was hoping for; sure you get some stories about Jerome Bettis, Herschel Walker, head injuries and weight lifting...but not the treatment a sport of its magnitude would warrant.
2. The science is very basic and done so to reach a larger audience. Links or an appendix would have given curious readers more to immediately munch on.
3. At no fault of the author, the science of genetics is still too young to be able to answer the most demanding questions to a satisfactory level.
4. No formal separate bibliography...you have to surf through the notes.
5. Few links.

In summary, the perfect summer book. This was a page-turner of a book that provides us a glimpse into elite athleticism through the eyes of science. David Epstein provides sports enthusiasts with a scientific treat. One thing is perfectly clear...genetics is very complex and we are in its infancy. That being said, it's fascinating science and its increased understanding will continue to be applied to the world of sports. Epstein provides readers with an excellent appetizer of things to come; if you are interested in how genetics is being applied to extraordinary athletic performance, I highly recommend this book!

Recommendations: "Outliers: The Story of Success" by Malcom Gladwell, "Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us" by Daniel H. Pink, "The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business" by Charles Duhigg, "Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (Vintage)" by Leonard Mlodinow, "Running Science" by Owen Anderson, "Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body" by Neil Shubin, "The Making of the Fittest: DNA and the Ultimate Forensic Record of Evolution" by Sean B. Carroll, "The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution" by Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending, "Relics of Eden: The Powerful Evidence of Evolution in Human DNA" by Daniel J. Fairbanks, "Why Darwin Matters: The Case Against Intelligent Design" by Michael Shermer, "Only a Theory" by Kenneth R. Miller, "The Greatest Show on Earth" by Richard Dawkins and, "Why Evolution Is True" by Jerry A. Coyne.
25 internautes sur 30 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x99ab5870) étoiles sur 5 "FASCINATING, ELEGANT, AND IMPRESSIVE!" 1 août 2013
Par Author/Reviewer Geri Ahearn - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
David Epstein delivers an interesting and impressive narrative, through extensive research on sports and genetics. The author highlights what makes a successful athlete, and how to obtain excellence to become one of the elite. The stories and interviews are thought-provoking, and inspiring. This insightful account is a must-read not only for athletes, but coaches, and parents as well. Of all the sports information I've read in books about athletes, this one is a golden gem on this topic. The science behind an athlete's performance is covered to a great extent, and the more you read, the more interesting it becomes. Informative, and educational. Highly recommended!
13 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x99ab58c4) étoiles sur 5 Thoroughly Enjoyed Reading the Sports Gene! 7 août 2013
Par Harry M. Mbang - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Wow! Just finished reading this book and am still buzzing from it. How to even surmise?

The Sports Gene is the most enjoyable Science writing I have ever read and probably one of the best non-fiction books I can remember reading. It is at once accessible and educational while always being engaging.

I loved learning about what traits help separate the elite from the good, some I knew or could have guessed, many I had no idea (vision in baseball, long torsos short legs in swimming, low hemoglobin in sprinters and a passion for pulling in sled dogs to name a few).

I loved learning about the mutations that geography and history favored that help explain over representation by different Races in certain events, like the Kalenjin in endurance running, certain Asian groups in weightlifting and gymnastics and Europeans from higher latitudes in swimming.

I loved learning that there is so much more that Science doesn't know about genetics and which genes directly result in superior performance. After all the traits discovered which seem to confer an advantage here or there, are but pools in a sea of traits we do not yet understand. My understanding is that there is a potential elite athlete in each of us if can find (or create) the right sport, or more practically an optimal training program if we can figure out what our unique body responds to!

The many personal sports (the world's favorite past time) anecdotes spanning continents and the last centuries sometimes told in the language of genetic science made this reading very engaging and educative.

The Sports Gene is very hard to put down! And I guess that's all I really needed to say! Enjoy, Happy Reading. I can't wait to re-read!
10 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x99ab5990) étoiles sur 5 Good job on a tough subject 25 septembre 2013
Par Lloyd Porter - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Epstein writes well and weaves stories of real people into a narrative that could, in the wrong hands, be quite dry. It's great to see him take on Malcolm Gladwell on the facts. Gladwell writes engaging, popular books that demand some critical review. Epstein does so on Gladwell's 10,000-hour thesis in "Outliers." On many levels it's a 4-star book. I rated as 3-stars largely because it felt like an excellent "Atlantic" article that was stretched into a book. The outcome for me therefore was "average." The conclusion is not surprising -- and perhaps not satisfying -- and you could see it coming from midway through the book.
18 internautes sur 22 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x99ab5bdc) étoiles sur 5 Great reporting, easy to read and inspiring 2 août 2013
Par David Dusek - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
The best part about this fascinating book is that you don't need a degree in biology or chemistry to understand what Epstein is writing about. The questions that he puts forth, and the answers that he provides, are written in a conversational tone, blending insightful attention to details, humor, and a broad-ranging world view.

I was a collegiate tennis player and knew several guys who peaked early or seemed to have a gift for the sport, but I was a late-bloomer. Epstein's book helps to explain why, even within the same training system, some people seemed to get a lot better, a lot faster, than everyone else. I thought it was very interesting to read how several countries are now actively seeking out children and teens who have genetic traits that could predispose them to excel at certain sports or thrive within certain training environments.

The Sports Gene doesn't definitively answer every question about why some people win and others don't, but after I finished reading it I couldn't help thinking about the amazing athletic potential human beings still have. For a book filled with science, it's actually a very inspiring read.
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