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The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food (Anglais) Broché – 6 novembre 2014


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--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché.
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Revue de presse

The Chicago Tribune
“[A]uthor Dan Barber's tales are engaging, funny and delicious... The Third Plate invites inevitable comparisons with Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma, which Barber invokes more than once. And, indeed, its framework of a foodie seeking truth through visits with sages and personal experiments echoes Pollan's landmark tome (not to mention his passages on wheat cultivation, which, astonishingly, best Pollan's corn cultivation chapters by many pages.) But at the risk of heresy, I would call this The Omnivore's Dilemma 2.0... The Third Plate serves as a brilliant culinary manifesto with a message as obvious as it is overlooked. Promote, grow and eat a diet that's in harmony with the earth and the earth will reward you for it. It's an inspiring message that could truly help save our water, air and land before it's too late.”

The Washington Post
"Not since Michael Pollan has such a powerful storyteller emerged to reform American food.... Barber is helping to write a recipe for the sustainable production of gratifying food."

Pittsburgh-Post Gazette:
There hasn’t been a call-to-action book with the potential to change the way we eat since Michael Pollan’s 2006 release, The Omnivore’s Dilemma. Now there is. Dan Barber’s The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food is a compelling global journey in search of a new understanding about how to build a more sustainable food system….The Third Plate is an argument for good rather than an argument against bad. This recipe might at times be challenging, but what’s served in the end is a dish for a better future….Barber writes a food manifesto for the ages.”

The Wall Street Journal:
"Compelling... The Third Plate reimagines American farm culture not as a romantic return to simpler times but as a smart, modern version of it...The Third Plate is fun to read, a lively mix of food history, environmental philosophy and restaurant lore... an important and exciting addition to the sustainability discussion.”

The Atlantic:
“When The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Michael Pollan’s now-classic 2006 work, questioned the logic of our nation’s food system, 'local' and 'organic' weren’t ubiquitous the way they are today. Embracing Pollan’s iconoclasm, but applying it to the updated food landscape of 2014, The Third Plate reconsiders fundamental assumptions of the movement Pollan’s book helped to spark. In four sections—'Soil,' 'Land,' 'Sea,' and 'Seed'—The Third Plate outlines how his pursuit of intense flavor repeatedly forced him to look beyond individual ingredients at a region’s broader story—and demonstrates how land, communities, and taste benefit when ecology informs the way we source, cook, and eat.”

The New York Times:
"Each grain represents an agricultural virtue: Rye, for example, builds carbon in the soil. Taken together, they argue for a new way of thinking about the production and consumption of food, a 'whole farm' approach that Mr. Barber explores, eloquently and zestfully, in The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food... Mr. Barber’s subjects tend to be colorfully eccentric and good talkers, capable of philosophizing by the yard. To put their efforts in context, Mr. Barber unobtrusively weaves in a hefty amount of science and food history. Readers will put the book down having learned quite a bit... Mr. Barber is a stylish writer and a funny one, too."

Publishers Weekly:“Barber’s work is a deeply thoughtful and–offering a ‘menu for 2050’–even visionary work for a sustainable food chain.”

Vice President Al Gore:
"Dan Barber’s new book, The Third Plate, is an eloquent and thoughtful look at the current state of our nation’s food system and how it must evolve. Barber’s wide range of experiences, both in and out of the kitchen, provide him with a rare perspective on this pressing issue. A must read.”

Ruth Reichl, author of Garlic and Sapphires and Tender at the Bone:
“In this compelling read Dan Barber asks questions that nobody else has raised about what it means to be a chef, the nature of taste, and what 'sustainable' really means. He challenges everything you think you know about food; it will change the way you eat. If I could give every cook just one book, this would be the one.”

Eric Schlosser, author of Fast Food Nation and Command and Control:
"Dan Barber is not only a great chef, he's also a fine writer. His vision of a new food system—based on diversity, complexity, and a reverence for nature—isn't utopian. It's essential."

Malcolm Gladwell, author of David and Goliath and The Tipping Point:
“I thought it would be impossible for Dan Barber to be as interesting on the page as he is on the plate. I was wrong.”

Elizabeth Kolbert, author of The Sixth Extinction and Field Notes from a Catastrophe:
The Third Plate is one of those rare books that's at once deft and searching—deeply serious and equally entertaining. Dan Barber will change the way you look at food.”

Eliot Coleman, author of The New Organic Grower and The Four Season Farm Gardener’s Cookbook:
"After my first meal at Blue Hill, I paid Dan the ultimate farmer compliment. I told him that he made vegetables taste almost fresher after he had prepared them than when the farmer harvested them. Now I am equally impressed with his writing. Food has stories and Dan tells the stories as well as he cooks. If you want to know about food, read this book."

Andrew Solomon, author of Far from the Tree and The Noonday Demon:
“Dan Barber writes with the restrained lushness with which he cooks. In elegant prose, he argues persuasively that eating is our most profound engagement with the non-human world. How we eat makes us who we are and makes the environment what it is. It all needs to change, and Barber has written a provocative manifesto that balances brave originality and meticulous research. His food is farm-to-table; his eloquent, impassioned book is farm-to-heart."

Bill McKibben, author of Wandering Home:
“Dan Barber is as fine a thinker and writer as he is a chef—which is saying a great deal. This book uses its ingredients—the insights of some of the finest farmers on the planet—to fashion something entirely new: a recipe for the future.” --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

Présentation de l'éditeur

“Not since Michael Pollan has such a powerful storyteller emerged to reform American food.” —The Washington Post

Today’s optimistic farm-to-table food culture has a dark secret: the local food movement has failed to change how we eat. It has also offered a false promise for the future of food. In his visionary New York Times–bestselling book, chef Dan Barber offers a radical new way of thinking about food that will heal the land and taste good, too. Looking to the detrimental cooking of our past, and the misguided dining of our present, Barber points to a future “third plate”: a new form of American eating where good farming and good food intersect. Barber’s The Third Plate charts a bright path forward for eaters and chefs alike, daring everyone to imagine a future for our national cuisine that is as sustainable as it is delicious. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .


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55 internautes sur 61 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Delightful and challenging. The best book about food culture since 'Omnivore's Dilemma' 20 mai 2014
Par Jesse Kornbluth - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I thought Michael Pollan’s "The Omnivore’s Dilemma" was pretty much the last word about the food we eat, why we eat it, its cost to our health and the planet’s health, and how we can do better.

I wasn’t alone in that view. But the gold standard is now Dan Barber’s “The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food.”

Dan Barber is the chef at Blue Hill at the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture in Pocantico Hills, New York and at Blue Hill New York. At those restaurants, as the foodies among you know, Barber has taken farm-to-table dining to its logical extreme — he grows much of the food he cooks. The difference between his meals and the organic cooking of other chefs begins and ends with that fact. His carrots seem to be from a different, finer planet. Ditto his lamb. The wonder is that the source of his otherworldly food is this planet — Barber has found a way to tastes that most of us have never experienced.

“Perhaps no other chef in New York City does as enthusiastic an impersonation of the farmer in the dell as Mr. Barber, and perhaps no other restaurant makes as serious and showy an effort to connect diners to the origins of their food as Blue Hill,” Frank Bruni wrote in the New York Times, awarding Blue Hill three stars. “Here the meals have back stories, lovingly rendered by servers who announce where the chanterelles were foraged and how the veal was fed. It’s an exercise in bucolic gastronomy, and it might be slightly cloying if it weren’t so intensely pleasurable.”

Sorry, but it is cloying.

There is something borderline obscene about weeping over roasted asparagus with beet yogurt and stinging nettles or swooning over purple potato gnocchi with green garlic, ramp shoots and hon shimeji mushrooms while, not far away, children go hungry. But as I understand it, Dan Barber isn’t serving this food only because he’s gunning to unseat whatever restaurant is regarded as the world’s best. He’s doing it to explore the concept of “delicious.”

The story of this book is how the meaning of “delicious” changed for him and how he came to a fresh, larger definition: bringing that level of satisfaction and nutrition to people who will never know his name or eat in his restaurant.

Here’s his understanding of the way food works in our country:

The “first plate” is a hulking, corn-fed steak with a few vegetables on the side.

The “second plate” is a smaller, grass-fed steak, no bigger than your fist, with vegetables that come from farmers who get name-checked by the waiters. This was what his restaurants served. As he writes, “It’s better tasting, and better for the planet, but the second plate’s architecture is identical to the first. It, too, is damaging — disrupting the ecological balances of the planet, causing soil depletion and nutrient loss — and in the end it isn’t a sustainable way to farm or eat.”

The “third plate” represents a non-violent revolution. The steak looks like an afterthought. The carrots rule.

Despite the book’s title, the plate — the food prepared by a chef and served in a restaurant — is not the real subject of this book.

“The Third Plate” is about farming.

With that sentence, I’m in danger of losing half of you here, maybe more, so let’s go to the video of Dan Barber, at TED, talking about an astonishingly delicious fish and the man who figured out a way to farm it. It’s a great story. A deeply entertaining, even thrilling story, completely worth your time. But if you want just the punch line, start around 14:45, because at that point this amusing observer ignites and breathes fire. His love story about a chef and a fish, he says, is also instructive: “You might say it’s a recipe for the future of good food… What we need is a radically new conception of agriculture, one in which the food actually tastes good.”

This is not a small point. You can make a good case for America’s weight problem on the idea that our food does not supply us with the nutrition we need, so we eat more to get it. The way out? The merger of pre-industrial agriculture with great cooking. Or, to put it more elegantly: “The ecological choice for food is also the most ethical choice. And, generally, the most delicious choice.”

Hold this thought. Underline it. It is on the final exam — no, it is the final exam. I mean: for us, for the planet.

I’m making the book sound somber. In truth, it’s mostly a collection of stories. Brilliant stories, mostly. (The ones you want to skip are in the first section of the book, where you can learn more about soil than you’ll ever want to know.) Barber is as gifted a writer as he is a chef; he tells these stories largely in dialogue, as in a novel. Were they all taped? Did Barber rush home to scribble them down? There is no note about the accuracy of these conversations. That may not trouble most readers; it troubles me.

I know I bang on about the length of books. “The Third Plate” fills 447 pages. That is — the metaphor is wrong, I know — a very rich meal. I grasp that foodies will devour every word, but this book deserves the widest possible audience, and its completeness works against that. I wish worthy but overstuffed books like this were like DVDs: a studio version and a director’s cut that includes scenes that had to be deleted for the sake of a crisp viewer experience. A chef’s cut, if you will.

Still, give “The Third Plate” four stars. Call it “delicious.” Then join a CSA and start doing your part to save the planet — and your life.
21 internautes sur 24 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Great ideas about sustainable menus... for the wealthy 20 août 2014
Par Jordan Michel - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I wasn't planning to write a review for this book, but I am so surprised by the current 4.7 star rating that I just had to share my perspective.

I enjoyed much of this book. I think Dan Barber is really intelligent and has lots of great ideas about food and agriculture. I think that this book is worth reading if you're interested in those topics and you've already read The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals. (If you haven't read The Omnivore's Dilemma, please start there; it's less pretentious and will be more relevant to most people.) Like Pollan, Barber travels the source to better understand the systems that produce foods, and his discoveries are quite interesting. They might even be revolutionary if they seemed scalable... and that's where the book falls short.

Barber's exclusive focus on haute cuisine makes me wonder how applicable his ideas are to the majority of Americans who don't dine at swanky New York restaurants every night. He seems to believe in a trickle-down food culture where something he puts on his menu will somehow transform the way everyone else eats. He has great ideas about how to create a sustainable menu. In fact, it's probably his insistence on the purest definition of sustainability that makes his ideas seem so unattainable. Unfortunately, I'm just not sure 90% of the country will ever have access to this kind of food. Even as a vegetable gardener and farmers market shopper with a flock of backyard chickens, I felt like most of what he discussed about sustainability was unattainable.

NOTE: I listened to the audio book, which is read by Barber. Despite my complaints above, I really like him. He's thoughtful and sincere. I'd love to sit down and chat with him about how his ideas might find relevance at less than $100 a plate.
8 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A lot to learn, a lot to absorb 27 juin 2014
Par Sibelius - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit ( De quoi s'agit-il? )
At 450+ pages this is a long and detailed book that steadily maintains a laconic pace with author, Dan Barber, leisurely meandering to and fro ruminating and contemplating on the flaws of the modern food industrial system and how to fix it in order to feed the planet in a sustainable (and pleasurable) manner. While there is a certain severity to the content I found the volume in its entirety to be a veritable page turner - Barber has a lot to say and share and he manages to do so in a compelling and personable manner that slowly unfolds all while educating the reader every step of the way.

The book is comprised of 4 sections; 'Soil - Land - Sea - Seed,' and Barber's focus with each is from a foundation-infrastructure perspective. For example with 'Soil,' this is the essential component that fuels agriculture and so Barber examines the current state of the mega-agribusiness farming industry and how its practices continuously deteriorate soil and the resulting tasteless, less nutritious grains and vegetables that spring forth. Barber will then turn focus onto systems that manage each resource correctly - typically a 'whole farm' process that involves grain, veg and livestock production into one integrated system that holistically sustains and replenishes itself.

The best quality of the book is Barber's perspective as a 4-star Chef. While sustainability is the chief concern throughout, the quality of ingredients for the sake of delicious meals are also at front and center giving the book a nice balance between hard-edged, environmental concern and measured foodie pleasure.
12 internautes sur 14 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Practice What You Preach... Checked. 20 mai 2014
Par NYFB [Je suis Charlie ET Ahmed] - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Dan Barber as a chef and author offers his knowledge about nutrition and diet through his experience that he has earned on his farm and his award winning restaurant Blue Hill at Stone Barns located along the Hudson River in New York. I as a nutritionist have a very good idea of the nutritional values of a food ingredients but Dan offers the knowledge of farming and the impact of different plants to the soil and the environment. The relation of growing food and the type of food offered by Dan is the same argument that has existed for last few decades with Agra business with their unsustainable farming practices on the other side of the isle. Rotation and variety attracts many different healthy bugs as well as offer nutrients to soil but instead big Agra tries to achieve the maximum yield per acre with the same crop year after year with heavy use of chemicals which encourage the super-bugs and destruction of habitat for all healthy organism. We humans truly have a lot to lose regardless how sophisticated and intelligent creations we may consider ourselves unless we address issues raised by Dan.

Dan covers the Veta La Palma fish farm in his TED TALK. Amazing story of human accomplishment by Spain but yet embarrassing to other countries with wealth and knowledge where they lack the simple equation of ecosystem in their own environment especially for US where they could have created the bigger version of Veta La Palma farm in Louisiana, Mississippi and Florida.
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
An Amazing Deep-Dive into the Food system 21 juillet 2014
Par barrosd12 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
This is the first time I'm actually writing out a review for an item on Amazon, but if there's one book that deserves a glowing recommendation, it's Dan Barber's "The Third Plate".

I have to admit, I had no idea what I was in for with this one - I had recently come off of another fantastic book called "Salt, Sugar, Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us" and was looking for more information on how our food systems came to be and how to be a better consumer of food (something that Barber is also interested in).

The book is broken down into sections detailing farming, animal farming, fish farming, and finally seed genetics. The topics are covered with a fascination I have not seen successfully translated into prose in quite some time. Barber proves he's not only a fantastic chef, but also a tremendous writer. Just as he is discovering how little he himself knows about food, you too come along for the ride as we meet several of the farmers, chefs, and people he has met on his own awakening.

Rather than giving you a synopsis, let me tell you why this book is one of the top 10 I have ever read - no other book of this type has challenged my preconceptions about food and about the farming and systems surrounding food as this book has. Barber opens the book by describing what he terms "The Third Plate", an theoretical plate of food that will be able to feed future generations - by the end of the book, I found myself wondering what sorts of things I would be able to do as a humble home cook to discover and realize my own version of the plate that he describes.
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