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The New World of Welfare (Anglais) Broché – 1 septembre 2001


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21 internautes sur 22 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A comprehensive analysis of welfare reform 30 septembre 2002
Par MK - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
The New World of Welfare, edited by Rebecca Blank and Ron Haskins, is an intense and thorough examination of all facets of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, signed by President Bill Clinton in 1996. This bipartisan act was the most sweeping welfare reform ever. It was also widely criticized and clouded with controversy. Among the many items stirring debate was the five-year time limit imposed on the benefits, the level of funding devoted to child care, and the requirements meant to reduce out-of-wedlock births. The New World of Welfare is a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of these and other contentious points of the 1996 bill.
The editors have assembled a varied group of welfare experts to pick apart the act and explain where it has worked, and where it has not. These experts are split evenly between liberal and conservative views, creating a forum that attempts to promote further reflection rather than a particular ideology. Each chapter alternates between a conservative or a liberal viewpoint, and every once in awhile, there will be a rebuttal at the end of the chapter where the opposing side can chime in with their counterpoint.
The scope and depth of this book can make it a daunting to read. At times, the sheer amount of information - facts, figures, charts, and graphs - seem overwhelming. That this information is often times called into question by the opposing side puts that much more of a burden on the reader. This is a book that needs to be read actively, with notes and a highlighter, so that you can return to crucial bits of information.
The book begins with an outline of the 1996 Act. This chapter offers helpful analysis of how the bill has worked for the past six years, as well as providing an overview for the reauthorization debate that has already begun in Congress. From there, a bevy of experts, both academic and non-academic, take turns covering such issues as welfare-to-work programs, Medicaid and food stamps, and child support. Some of the most effective chapters deal with the different welfare-to-work systems put in place by each state. These systems take on new importance with because of the 5-year limit on benefits. With the onus on recipients to find work, states have been struggling to find the best way to move people into the workforce. Minnesota, for example, has higher-than-average earnings disregards, which means that a poor person receiving a pay check will not lose out on needed welfare supplements. Later in the book, there are also several interesting chapters that deal with the most controversial aspect of the 1996 Act: the money provided to reduce out-of-wedlock births. The debate in this section centers around the effectiveness of this provision. Though out-of-wedlock births have decreased, there has been no definite causal relationship between that and the welfare reform bill.
Overall, despite the challenging nature of this book, it is more than worthwhile. It provides no answers, only the impetus to keep thinking.
4 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
An invaluable and much appreciated contribution 6 février 2002
Par Midwest Book Review - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
In The New World Of Welfare, Rebecca Blank (dean of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan) and Ron Haskins (senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a senior consultant at the Annie E. Casey Foundation) effectively collaborate to compile and present an anthology of commentaries by a diverse group of welfare experts, both library and conservative, academic and nonacademic, to examine the political, cultural, and social issues arising from governmental approaches to contemporary welfare reform. The New World Of Welfare is an invaluable and much appreciated contribution to the on-going municipal, state and national debates on efforts to redesign and implement effective welfare and "workfare" programs.
1 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
The New World of Welfare 30 septembre 2002
Par Matthias Kraemer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
The New World of Welfare, edited by Rebecca Blank and Ron Haskins, is an intense and thorough examination of all facets of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, signed by President Bill Clinton in 1996. This bipartisan act was the most sweeping welfare reform ever. It was also widely criticized and clouded with controversy. Among the many items stirring debate was the five-year time limit imposed on the benefits, the level of funding devoted to child care, and the requirements meant to reduce out-of-wedlock births. The New World of Welfare is a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of these and other contentious points of the 1996 bill.
The editors have assembled a varied group of welfare experts to pick apart the act and explain where it has worked, and where it has not. These experts are split evenly between liberal and conservative views, creating a forum that attempts to promote further reflection rather than a particular ideology. Each chapter alternates between a conservative or a liberal viewpoint, and every once in awhile, there will be a rebuttal at the end of the chapter where the opposing side can chime in with their counterpoint.
The scope and depth of this book can make it a daunting to read. At times, the sheer amount of information - facts, figures, charts, and graphs - seem overwhelming. That this information is often times called into question by the opposing side puts that much more of a burden on the reader. This is a book that needs to be read actively, with notes and a highlighter, so that you can return to crucial bits of information.
The book begins with an outline of the 1996 Act. This chapter offers helpful analysis of how the bill has worked for the past six years, as well as providing an overview for the reauthorization debate that has already begun in Congress. From there, a bevy of experts, both academic and non-academic, take turns covering such issues as welfare-to-work programs, Medicaid and food stamps, and child support. Some of the most effective chapters deal with the different welfare-to-work systems put in place by each state. These systems take on new importance with because of the 5-year limit on benefits. With the onus on recipients to find work, states have been struggling to find the best way to move people into the workforce. Minnesota, for example, has higher-than-average earnings disregards, which means that a poor person receiving a pay check will not lose out on needed welfare supplements. Later in the book, there are also several interesting chapters that deal with the most controversial aspect of the 1996 Act: the money provided to reduce out-of-wedlock births. The debate in this section centers around the effectiveness of this provision. Though out-of-wedlock births have decreased, there has been no definite causal relationship between that and the welfare reform bill.
Overall, despite the challenging nature of this book, it is more than worthwhile. It provides no answers, only the impetus to keep thinking.
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