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Think of a Number
 
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Think of a Number [Format Kindle]

John Verdon
5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (5 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Chapter 1

Cop art

Jason Strunk was by all accounts an inconsequential fellow, a bland thirty-something, nearly invisible to his neighbors--and apparently inaudible as well, since none could recall a single specific thing he'd ever said. They couldn't even be certain that he'd ever spoken. Perhaps he'd nodded, perhaps said hello, perhaps muttered a word or two. It was hard to say.

All expressed a conventional initial amazement, even a temporary disbelief, at the revelation of Mr. Strunk's obsessive devotion to killing middle-aged men with mustaches and his uniquely disturbing way of disposing of the bodies: cutting them into manageable segments, wrapping them colorfully, and mailing them to local police officers as Christmas presents.

Dave Gurney gazed intently at the colorless, placid face of Jason Strunk--actually, the original Central Booking mug shot of Jason Strunk--that stared back at him from his computer screen. The mug shot had been enlarged to make the face life-size, and it was surrounded at the borders of the screen by the tool icons of a creative photo-retouching program that Gurney was just starting to get the hang of.

He moved one of the brightness-control tools on the screen to the iris of Strunk's right eye, clicked his mouse, and then examined the small highlight he'd created.

Better, but still not right.

The eyes were always the hardest--the eyes and the mouth--but they were the key. Sometimes he had to experiment with the position and intensity of one tiny highlight for hours, and even then he'd end up with something not quite what it should be, not good enough to show to Sonya, and definitely not Madeleine.

The thing about the eyes was that they, more than anything else, captured the tension, the contradiction--the uncommunicative blandness spiked with a hint of cruelty that Gurney had often discerned in the faces of murderers with whom he'd had the opportunity to spend quality time.

He'd gotten the look right with his patient manipulation of the mug shot of Jorge Kunzman (the Walmart stock clerk who always kept the head of his last date in his refrigerator until he could replace it with one more recent). He'd been pleased with the result, which conveyed with disturbing immediacy the deep black emptiness lurking in Mr. Kunzman's bored expression, and Sonya's excited reaction, her gush of praise, had solidified his opinion. It was that reception, plus the unexpected sale of the piece to one of Sonya's collector friends, that motivated him to produce the series of creatively doctored photographs now being featured in a show headlined Portraits of Murderers by the Man Who Caught Them, in Sonya's small but pricey gallery in Ithaca.

How a recently retired NYPD homicide detective with a yawning uninterest in art in general and trendy art in particular, and a deep distaste for personal notoriety, could have ended up as the focus of a chic university-town art show described by local critics as "a cutting-edge blend of brutally raw photographs, unflinching psychological insights, and masterful graphic manipulations" was a question with two very different answers: his own and his wife's.

As far as he was concerned, it all began with Madeleine's cajoling him into taking an art-appreciation course with her at the museum in Cooperstown. She was forever trying to get him out--out of his den, out of the house, out of himself, just out. He'd learned that the best way to stay in control of his own time was through the strategy of periodic capitulations. The art-appreciation course was one of these strategic moves, and although he dreaded the prospect of sitting through it, he expected it to immunize him against further pressures for at least a month or two. It wasn't that he was a couch potato--far from it. At the age of forty-seven, he could still do fifty push-ups, fifty chin-ups, and fifty sit-ups. He just wasn't very fond of going places.

The course, however, turned out to be a surprise--in fact, three surprises. First, despite his pre-course assumption that his greatest challenge would be staying awake, he found the instructor, Sonya Reynolds, a gallery owner and artist of regional renown, riveting. She was not conventionally beautiful, not in the archetypal Northern European Catherine Deneuve mode. Her mouth was too pouty, her cheekbones overly prominent, her nose too strong. But somehow the imperfect parts were unified into a uniquely striking whole by large eyes of a deep smoky green and by a manner that was completely relaxed and naturally sensual. There were not many men in the class, just six of the twenty-six attendees, but she had the absolute attention of all six.

The second surprise was his positive reaction to the subject matter. Because it was a special interest of hers, Sonya devoted considerable time to art derived from photography--photography that had been manipulated to create images that were more powerful or communicative than the originals.

The third surprise came three weeks into the twelve-week course, on the night that she was commenting enthusiastically on a contemporary artist's silk-screen prints derived from solarized photographic portraits. As Gurney gazed at the prints, the idea came to him that he could take advantage of an unusual resource to which he had special access and to which he could bring a special perspective. The notion was strangely exciting. The last thing he'd expected from an art-appreciation course was excitement.

Once this occurred to him--the concept of enhancing, clarifying, intensifying criminal mug shots, particularly the mug shots of murderers, in ways that would capture and convey the nature of the beast he had spent his career studying, pursuing, and outwitting--it took hold, and he thought about it more often than he would have been comfortable admitting. He was, after all, a cautious man who could see both sides of every question, the flaw in every conviction, the naivete in every enthusiasm.

As Gurney worked at the desk in his den that bright October morning on the mug shot of Jason Strunk, the pleasant challenge of the process was interrupted by the sound of something being dropped on the floor behind him.

"I'm leaving these here," said Madeleine Gurney in a voice that to anyone else might have sounded casual but to her husband was fraught.

He looked over his shoulder, his eyes narrowing at the sight of the small burlap sack leaning against the door. "Leaving what?" he asked, knowing the answer.

"Tulips," said Madeleine in the same even tone.

"You mean bulbs?"

It was a silly correction, and they both knew it. It was just a way of expressing his irritation at Madeleine's wanting him to do something he didn't feel like doing.

"What do you want me to do with them in here?"

"Bring them out to the garden. Help me plant them."

He considered pointing out the illogic of her bringing into the den something for him to bring back out to the garden but thought better of it.

"As soon as I finish with this," he said a little resentfully. He realized that planting tulip bulbs on a glorious Indian-summer day in a hilltop garden overlooking a rolling panorama of crimson autumn woods and emerald pastures under a cobalt sky was not a particularly onerous assignment. He just hated being interrupted. And this reaction to interruption, he told himself, was a by-product of his greatest strength: the linear, logical mind that had made him such a successful detective--the mind that was jarred by the slightest discontinuity in a suspect's story, that could sense a fissure too tiny for most eyes to see.

Madeleine peered over his shoulder at the computer screen. "How can you work on something so ugly on a day like this?" she asked.

Chapter 2

A perfect victim

David and Madeleine Gurney lived in a sturdy nineteenth-century farmhouse, nestled in the corner of a secluded pasture at the end of a dead-end road in the Delaware County hills five miles outside the village of Walnut Crossing. The ten-acre pasture was surrounded by woods of cherry, maple, and oak.

The house retained its original architectural simplicity. During the year they'd owned it, the Gurneys had restored to a more appropriate appearance the previous owner's unfortunate updates--replacing, for example, bleak aluminum windows with wood-framed versions that possessed the divided-light style of an earlier century. They did it not out of a mania for historical authenticity but in recognition that the original aesthetics had somehow been right. This matter of how one's home should look and feel was one of the subjects on which Madeleine and David were in complete harmony--a list that, it seemed to him, had lately been shrinking.

This thought had been eating like acid at his mood most of the day, activated by his wife's comment about the ugliness of the portrait he was working on. It was still at the edge of his consciousness that afternoon when, dozing in his favorite Adirondack chair after the tulip-planting activity, he became aware of Madeleine's footsteps brushing toward him through the ankle-high grass. When the footsteps stopped in front of his chair, he opened one eye.

"Do you think," she said in her calm, light way, "it's too late to take the canoe out?" Her voice positioned the words deftly between a question and a challenge.

Madeleine was a slim, athletic forty-five-year-old who could easily be mistaken for thirty-five. Her eyes were frank, steady, appraising. Her long brown hair, with the exception of a few errant strands, was pulled up under her broad-brimmed straw gardening hat.

He responded with a question from his own train of thought. "Do you really think it's ugly?"

"Of course it's ugly," she said without hesitation. "Isn't it supposed to be?"

He frowned as he considered her comment. "You mean the subject matter?" he asked.

"What else would I mean?"

"I don't know." He shrugged. "You sounded a bit contemptuous of the whole thing--the execution as well as the subject matter...

Revue de presse

"[An] inventive and entertaining first thriller. The hard-edged characters and gritty plot recall Chandler's "mean streets," but the ornate puzzles laid before Verdon's detective might have challenged the "little grey cells" of Hercule Poirot."--Washington Post

"Mr. Verdon was an advertising executive who retired to upstate New York before deciding on a more artistic pursuit. And if THINK OF A NUMBER is any indication, he'll have no trouble forgetting about that day job. The transition couldn't be much smoother...Verdon is masterly at keeping Gurney [his protagonist] a step ahead of the reader [and] the murder itself is a pretty crafty piece of legerdemain....[The novel features] the kind of head-scratching setup that would get Sherlock Holmes off his cocaine [and] Gurney has the same precision, logic and thirst for clarity."--New York Times

"Verdon’s deftly written, erudite debut is an exquisitely plotted novel of suspense."
--Portland Oregonian

"Mostly what makes this work is the intricate fabric that debut novelist Verdon weaves, as complications twist into what seems to be an impossible knot."--Chicago Sun-Times

"Good writing and good storytelling often aren’t the same thing. Verdon combines them masterfully...Here’s hoping Verdon has what it takes to churn out more books like this."--Newark Star Ledger

“Verdon’s brought back crimes of impossibility, starting with the titular parlor game trifle and escalating until we're deep into serial murder territory. Verdon is a master at controlling pace, illustrating the story of a rich but complicated marriage, pondering what it means to be sucked back into your life's work even if it might kill you, and demanding that the reader use his or her brain to figure out what comes next. When you're finished, you may not trust silly parlor games ever again.”--Salon
 
“Savor the sense of loss that haunts this strong debut.”--Houston Chronicle
 
“John Verdon has…created an incredible crime novel which could give Steig Larsson a run for his well-earned money…All of the characters are incredibly well developed…The descriptions of scenes make you feel like you are there, and the plot is brilliant.”--The Herald-Dispatch (West Virginia)
 
“Will hook just about any reader…An astoundingly addictive work filled with real life characters that jump off the page into a daring and skillful plot, this book will leave you stumped and hungry for more…THINK OF A NUMBER excels in its interweaving of wonderful characterization and psychological Insight…[Verdon] has created a book for all readers, not just those who revel in the thriller genre.”– New York Journal of Books
 
“The mystery is brilliantly executed…If you read only one thriller this year, make it THINK OF A NUMBER.”-- Bookloons
 
“Think of a number between one and ten…Now multiply that by zero. Which is how many times you’ll put this book down.” --Mystery Scene
 
"The numbers game gets a murderous spin in Verdon’s deft, literate debut."--Publishers Weekly

"Verdon’s superb debut novel is a riveting thriller with a wonderfully baffling crime. Think of a Number is a 10, and crime fans of almost every persuasion will love it. An outstanding debut."— Thomas Gaughan, Booklist (Starred Review)

“Addictive and thoroughly engrossing…In THINK OF A NUMBER, Verdon plays deliciously on our deepest, most primal fears, portraying a killer who seems to see right into people’s minds.  Few readers will be able to resist the lure of watching an unstoppable detective track an uncatchable killer.  This tale will grab hold of you like a steel jaw trap."--Joseph Finder, New York Times bestselling author of VANISHED
 
“Verdon's premise is clever and his police work convincing, which right there might be enough; but the real joy of this book is its characters.  Each one, no matter how minor, is unique and beautifully observed.  THINK OF A NUMBER had me from the opening pages and carried me right along.”-- S.J. Rozan, Edgar-winning author of THE SHANGHAI MOON

"Spectacular and mind-bending, THINK OF A NUMBER is the best thriller I've read in a long, long time. John Verdon's writing is so polished, so nuanced, it makes me envious that I didn't write this terrific novel."-- Tess Gerritsen, New York Times bestselling author of ICE COLD

“With its edge-of-the-chair suspense, memorable characters that jump off the pages, and elegant and deft writing, John Verdon's THINK OF A NUMBER is a stunning debut.”--Faye Kellerman, New York Times bestseller author of STONE KISS and THE FORGOTTEN

“THINK OF A NUMBER is truly unputdownable.  Rarely have I read a debut novel that has gripped me as this one has from the first page to the last.  This book doesn’t just entertain – it engages you and draws you immediately into the lives of the characters, who are as real as real can be.  John Verdon has written a flawless novel about flawed people and he’s written it beautifully.  I hope we see a lot more of John Verdon and his smart protagonist, Dave Gurney, in years to come.”--Nelson DeMille, New York Times bestseller author of THE LION’S GAME, THE GENERAL’S DAUGHTER and GOLD COAST

"John Verdon's THINK OF A NUMBER is one of the finest thrillers I've read in years. I devoured it.  Consistently intelligent, fast-paced, filled with clever twists and psychological insight, and characters that come alive on every page, it entertains from the opening set-piece, right through the tension-filled ending. In a genre frequently and sadly known for delivering more of the same old familiar stuff, THINK OF A NUMBER stands out as original and exciting. If there were a line-up of upcoming mystery-thriller suspects,  I have little doubt that just about every witness would pick out THINK OF A NUMBER.”--John Katzenbach, New York Times bestselling author of THE TRAVELER, JUST CAUSE and HART’S WAR
 
“John Verdon’s THINK OF A NUMBER is simply one of the best thrillers I’ve read in a lifetime of thriller reading -- eloquent, heart-rending, deeply suspenseful on many levels, and relentlessly intelligent.  The characters live and breathe, the plot is diabolically clever and airtight, and the prose is sublime.  Absolutely not to be missed! At one stroke, Verdon establishes himself as a bright star in the thriller firmament.”--John Lescroart, New York Times bestselling author of  THE SUSPECT, BETRAYAL and A PLAGUE OF SECRETS
 
“Just when you think the serial killer thriller has been done to death, someone comes along and revives it!  THINK OF A NUMBER is written with pace, style and intelligence. It has rounded characters, teasing puzzles, and lots of tension. The number I'm thinking of is 1!”--Reginald Hill, author of RULING PASSION and MIDNIGHT FUGUE and winner of the Crime Writer’s Association Dagger Award for Lifetime Achievement
 
"THINK OF A NUMBER is a subtle and intelligent thriller of the first order.  With his gripping premise, well-drawn characters, and relentless escalation of suspense, John Verdon has penned an exciting debut.  Don't miss it."--Lisa Unger, New York Times bestselling author of DIE FOR YOU
 
“THINK OF A NUMBER is a dark, disturbing, and completely compelling debut.
It's got menacing puzzles you won't be able to figure out, a villain who will raise the hairs on the back of your neck, and a wonderful main character in retired homicide cop Dave Gurney. The pages turn themselves.”--Spencer Quinn, New York Times bestselling author of DOG ON IT!

"I loved this book. It’s at once familiar to thriller readers and something incredibly new. It’s a puzzle mystery and a police procedural and a cautionary tale about loss and love—the book literally has something for everyone, with a conclusion so eerily perfect it could have been scripted by Hitchcock himself. This is a thriller that will rewrite the rules of the genre."—Will Lavender, New York Times bestselling author of OBEDIENCE
 




From the Hardcover edition.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2054 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 434 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 0307588920
  • Editeur : Penguin (5 août 2010)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B003ZDNNT4
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (5 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°32.820 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 ingénieux et addictif 9 janvier 2012
Par Pascale TOP 500 COMMENTATEURS
Format:Broché
"Pensez à un nombre entre un et mille -le premier qui vous passe par la tête. Retenez-le bien. A présent, voyez comme je connais vos secrets. Ouvrez la petite enveloppe."

Tel est le message anonyme que reçoit Mark Mellery, directeur-gourou d'un centre de développement personnel. Il se prête à ce petit jeu en apparence anodin et sa vie bascule lorsqu'il s'avère que l'enveloppe contient le nombre 658... soit précisément le nombre auquel il a pensé. Qui est donc cet inconnu qui connaît ses pensées les plus intimes et lui veut tout sauf du bien ? Terrorisé, Mark s'adresse à un ancien condisciple, David Gurney, jeune retraité du NYPD, dans l'espoir de mettre un terme à ce jeu machiavélique...

Premier roman de John Verdon, "658" ("Think of a Number") est un thriller qui captive dès la première page et ne vous lâche plus. Il a le mérite d'allier à une intrigue impeccable une profondeur humaine et psychologique -notamment au travers du personnage tourmenté de Dave Gurney ; paradoxalement, je constate que c'est précisément ce que lui reprochent certaines critiques négatives. Chacun sa façon de percevoir les choses, bien sûr, mais personnellement, j'apprécie un thriller qui n'est pas action pure mais prend la peine de s'arrêter aux êtres, aux paysages, aux ambiances, et les passages relatifs au vécu de Gurney ne m'ont nullement paru lourds ou inutiles, bien au contraire.
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 L'inattendu 22 août 2011
Par amcgamcg
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
C'est par excellence le genre "mystère": le lecteur se fait avoir par ce qui semble être un tour de passe-passe d'un magicien ou d'un génie de la Perception Extra-Sensorielle, alors que l'explication est simple mais inattendue.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 un auteur original,une idée novatrice 18 avril 2013
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
J'ai aimé le style de l'auteur, qui se lit vraiment bien, incisif, vif, intéressant. Il s'attache beaucoup aux caractères psychologiques des personnages, qui sont littéralement disséqués dans leur moindre pensée, intonations de voix, choix de mots (si la femme dit "bonsoir" d'une telle façon, et non pas "bonjour" d'une autre façon, cela a une importance...) Cette acuité dans les relations, ce "décorticage" est tellement présent, tellement prégnant qu'il se rapproche d'une certaine paranoïa ... C'est ce qui met un peu mal à l'aise parfois, la vision des autres et des relations professionnelles et maritales vues comme une attaque personnelle, souvent. Il dénonce beaucoup également l'attitude des policiers, dont peu trouvent grâce à ses yeux (règlement de comptes personnel ? ). Ce "lynchage" est un peu exagéré, l'auteur nous rend complices malgré nous d'une aversion vis à vis de la police américaine, qui en fait ne nous regarde pas. L'intrigue du roman est un peu tirée par les cheveux, on ne croit pas trop à un criminel aussi diabolique, mais c'est intéressant quand même. En un mot, je recommande ce livre, et j'espère qu'il en écrira d'autres.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 ...vraiment surprenante histoire..surtout la fin ! 30 août 2012
Par vivitron1
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
Un excellent roman, une très bonne description de l'ambience et du personnage principal. Le plus surprenant reste tout de même le dénouement, pour le moins inhabituel pour un roman policier. Très imaginatif !! Je conseille.
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0 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 En anglais : Parfait 29 août 2011
Par livre
Format:Poche
J'apprécie de pouvoir avoir un choix de langue que je ne retrouve pas ailleurs. En ce qui concerne le livre j'attends avec impatience le nouveau livre de cet auteur que je ne connaissais pas. Très bon texte,très bonne énigme.
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&quote;
We each seem to be wired to believe my situation causes my problems but your personality causes yours. This creates trouble. My desire to have everything my way seems to make sense, while your desire to have everything your way seems infantile. A better day would be a day during which I felt better and you behaved better. The way I see things is the way they are. The way you see things is warped by your agenda. &quote;
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The simplest conflict is the one between the way we view ourselves and the way we view others. For example, if we were arguing and you screamed at me, I would see the cause as your inability to control your temper. However, if I screamed at you, I would see the cause not as my temper but your provocation  something in you to which my scream is an appropriate response. &quote;
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he spent more time in the consideration of action than in action, more time in his head than in the world. &quote;
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