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Thirteen Reasons Why [Anglais] [Broché]

Jay Asher
3.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)
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Description de l'ouvrage

6 août 2009 PF TEENAGE FIC.
Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher is a phenomenal New York Times Number One bestseller. It tackles the aftermath of teen suicide from the critically acclaimed young adult author Jay Asher - perfect for fans of John Green's The Fault in Our Stars.You can't stop the future. You can't rewind the past. The only way to learn the secret . . . is to press play.Clay Jensen returns home to find a strange package with his name on it. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker - his classmate and first love - who committed suicide.Hannah's voice explains there are thirteen reasons why she killed herself and Clay is one of them. If he listens, he'll find out why.All through the night, Clay keeps listening - and what he discovers changes his life . . . Forever.Bestselling US author Jay Asher had the idea for his debut young adult novel Thirteen Reasons Why at a museum. Whilst taking an audio tour, he was struck by the eeriness of the voice in his ear - a woman who described everything he was looking at but wasn't there. You can hear Hannah's tapes at hannahsreasons.blogspot.com.

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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

“Everything affects everything,” declares Hannah Baker, who killed herself two weeks ago. After her death, Clay Jensen—who had a crush on Hannah—finds seven cassette tapes in a brown paper package on his doorstep. Listening to the tapes, Hannah chronicles her downward spiral and the 13 people who led her to make this horrific choice. Evincing the subtle—and not so subtle—cruelties of teen life, from rumors, to reputations, to rape, Hannah explains to her listeners that, “in the end, everything matters.” Most of the novel quite literally takes place in Clay’s head, as he listens to Hannah’s voice pounding in his ears through his headphones, creating a very intimate feel for the reader as Hannah explains herself. Her pain is gut-wrenchingly palpable, and the reader is thrust face-first into a world where everything is related, an intricate yet brutal tapestry of events, people and places. Asher has created an entrancing character study and a riveting look into the psyche of someone who would make this unfortunate choice. A brilliant and mesmerizing debut from a gifted new author.—Kirkus, starred review
--Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

Biographie de l'auteur

Jay Asher got the idea for Thirteen Reasons Why at a museum. While taking an audio tour, he was struck by the eeriness of the voice in his ear - a woman who described everything he was looking at , but wasn't there. Jay has worked in various bookstores and lives in California. The US bestseller, Thirteen Reasons Why, is his debut novel.

Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 304 pages
  • Editeur : Penguin (6 août 2009)
  • Collection : PF TEENAGE FIC.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0141328290
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141328294
  • Dimensions du produit: 19,3 x 12,7 x 2 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 901 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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Commentaires en ligne 

3.5 étoiles sur 5
3.5 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Courtesy of Teens Read Too 16 août 2011
Par TeensReadToo TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS
Format:Broché
Gold Star Award Winner!

I don't often write introductions to my reviews. In fact, the last time I can remember doing so was with the wonderful PUCKER by Melanie Gideon, which I read in 2006. However, THIRTEEN REASONS WHY, the debut novel from author Jay Asher, is the type of book that begs an introduction. So if you'd like to skip down to the third paragraph for the "meat" of the story, I won't hold it against you -- but you'll be missing something important.

If you have the chance to only read one novel this year, THIRTEEN REASONS WHY should be that book. It's sad, amazing, heartbreaking, and hopeful, all at the same time. I dare you to read it and not become so immersed in the story that you lose track of time and your surroundings. You'll cry, several times, while reading this story. You'll have no choice but to think about your actions, and wonder what type of effect they have on other people. And, in the end, you might also find the need to say "thank you."

Now, on to the story...

When Clay Jensen finds a package on his front porch, he's excited. A package, for him? With no return address? What could it possibly be? What Clay finds is a shoebox full of cassette tapes, each marked as "Cassette 1: Side A," "Cassette 1: Side B," etc. Of course he rushes to the old radio/cassette player in his dad's garage to check out these mysterious tapes.

And soon wishes, wholeheartedly, that he'd never picked up that stupid package from his front porch.

What he hears when he inserts that first tape is the voice of Hannah Baker. Hannah, the girl he'd crushed on for longer than he could remember. The girl he went to school with. The girl he worked at the movie theater with. The girl who had changed, drastically, in the last several months.
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3.0 étoiles sur 5 Un bon lvre 21 octobre 2013
Format:Broché|Achat authentifié par Amazon
Intérressant et même palpitant pour les trois quarts du livre...après le ressort du récit lasse un peu. Je l'ai malgré tout lu en 3 jours!
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Emotional and thought-provoking 5 mars 2013
Par Janelba-
Format:Format Kindle|Achat authentifié par Amazon
Wow what an amazing book. I enjoyed the writing style and execution of a sensitive subject matter!
Highly recommended read.
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2 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Mauvaises excuses... 29 octobre 2012
Par Flo Rida
Format:Broché|Achat authentifié par Amazon
J'ai détesté. Une adolescente se suicide et accuse son entourage.
"Tu ne m'as pas dit bonjour, j'espère que tu t'en veux maintenant."
L'histoire aurait pu être bien, mais j'ai trouvé ça glauque !
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 étoiles sur 5  1.704 commentaires
344 internautes sur 376 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Not just for Young Adults - Parents Need to Read this Too! 7 février 2008
Par Maudeen Wachsmith - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat authentifié par Amazon
I just finished this -- and I am telling you it was compelling. It should be required reading by anyone in high school or middle school -- or anyone who has a child in high school or middle school. Basically it tells of Clay Jensen, a high school student who receives a box of audiotapes narrated by a girl who he had a crush on, Hannah Baker, who has recently committed suicide. The book interweaves her words from the audiotapes with his comments and memories. It gives Hannah's reasons why she did what she did and names the people (who also are receiving audiotapes - each person is to mail them to the next person on the list) and why they contributed to what happened. It may have been something big, somewhat small, something seemingly innocent, something no so much. But it all leads up to Hannah not being able to cope by herself even when she reaches out for help. If anyone can read this and see themselves in it and make changes - or even better see someone else and reach out in compassion, this book will have a huge effect.
168 internautes sur 194 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Courtesy of Teens Read Too 18 octobre 2007
Par TeensReadToo - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I don't often write introductions to my reviews. In fact, the last time I can remember doing so was with the wonderful Pucker by Melanie Gideon, which I read in 2006. However, THIRTEEN REASONS WHY, the debut novel from author Jay Asher, is the type of book that begs an introduction. So if you'd like to skip down to the third paragraph for the "meat" of the story, I won't hold it against you -- but you'll be missing something important.

If you have the chance to only read one novel this year, THIRTEEN REASONS WHY should be that book. It's sad, amazing, heartbreaking, and hopeful, all at the same time. I dare you to read it and not become so immersed in the story that you lose track of time and your surroundings. You'll cry, several times, while reading this story. You'll have no choice but to think about your actions, and wonder what type of effect they have on other people. And, in the end, you might also find the need to say "thank you."

Now, on to the story...

When Clay Jensen finds a package on his front porch, he's excited. A package, for him? With no return address? What could it possibly be? What Clay finds is a shoebox full of cassette tapes, each marked as "Cassette 1: Side A," "Cassette 1: Side B," etc. Of course he rushes to the old radio/cassette player in his dad's garage to check out these mysterious tapes.

And soon wishes, wholeheartedly, that he'd never picked up that stupid package from his front porch.

What he hears when he inserts that first tape is the voice of Hannah Baker. Hannah, the girl he'd crushed on for longer than he could remember. The girl he went to school with. The girl he worked at the movie theater with. The girl who had changed, drastically, in the last several months. Hannah Baker, the girl who committed suicide.

Clay soon realizes that these tapes aren't just a suicide note, aren't, really, even a clear-cut rendition of why she did what she did. Instead, these are thirteen reasons -- thirteen people, to be exact -- who created a snowball-effect of events that led Hannah to believe that suicide was her only option. But why is Clay on that list? How could he possibly be one of the reasons that she killed herself?

As the day goes on, Clay becomes obsessed with listening to the tapes. And what he hears frightens him, disturbs him, and, in the end, leads him to realizations that he never would have expected. As Clay listens to the role that thirteen people, including himself, led in the ultimate death of Hannah Baker, his view of the world, and himself, changes drastically.

You will love this book, because you won't be able to help yourself. You will feel what Clay feels. You will, in a very strong way, experience the highs and lows of Hannah's life right along with her. And there is nothing, in my opinion, that could speak better for the authenticity of a book. Read THIRTEEN REASONS WHY. And then, if you're like me, you'll read it again. And, hopefully, none of us will ever forget it.

Reviewed by: Jennifer Wardrip, aka "The Genius"
411 internautes sur 506 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 One of the few who did not like this book 1 avril 2011
Par Erika (YA Lit Crave) - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I am one of the rare minority who did not enjoy this book. In fact, I was completely annoyed with it. I struggled through it and kept rolling my eyes. It took a lot to make myself finish it. I hoped it would get much better, since there is so much positive hype surrounding this book, but unfortunately it did not. I am also going to preface my negative comments by saying that I am not at all mean-spirited, heartless, or think lightly of suicide. I also have been at the receiving end of some terrible things in high school so I do know what that feels like, and so I am not approaching this as simply someone who didn't experience bad things in high school. Suicide is an extremely serious issue, and I think it is extremely important to be explored in books, especially considering the epidemic of teen suicides we have been facing lately. However, I felt like this book did not give it the respect and seriousness it deserves. I loved the concept of this story, and I think a story like this has the potential to be amazing and powerful. Perhaps if it was tackled by a different author or had different characters, maybe I would have thought it was.

I did enjoyed the dual narration format of the book. This was a very interesting and engaging format to choose. However, it did get a little bit confusing for me with the back and forth, not only because it switched from character to character as well as from present to flashback. This might have been because I was not 100% engaged with the book since I did not enjoy it, and so I bet I got a bit sloppy in my reading habits. I also applaud the creativity of the book, because it is such an usual and unique premise. The writing also is engaging, flows well, and is never boring.

My main problem was the characters. While I thought Clay was a very realistic character, and the emotions he went through while listening to Hannah's tapes where very realistic and appropriate, I did not like Hannah. I thought Hannah's voice seemed whiny and annoying. I felt as if she was being a spiteful, vindictive little child in talking to the people listening to the tapes, rather than seriously wanting people to know how their actions affected her. She was laughing and sounded humorous when I feel like she should have sounded somber and depressed. Her actions pointed to somber and depressed, yet her voice came away the exact opposite. This sounds terrible, but my impression of her voice was like "Nah, nah, nah, nah, nah! I killed myself and now you have to feel bad!" That is not at all what I wanted to come away with from this character. With her voice being this way, I could not sympathize with her. I tried and tried, but I just couldn't.

I am also annoyed with the reasons Hannah gave for her suicide. Some of them seemed so minute to me! Yes it's true, these things seem less terrible now as an adult removed from high school, and when they happen they seem like the end of the world, but I feel like the author could have chosen more substantial reasons or made them more significant. I won't go into the reasons, so this will be spoiler free.. but the reasons are all so little and silly, like an embarrassing thing or annoying thing that happened. What Hannah experienced seemed to be the norm for high school, and not valid enough reasons for her to want to kill herself. Now, I know that this book is supposed to show how small little actions have big ramifications, and I'm not trying to say that anyone should be made fun of for their reasons that push them to suicide... just that it didn't seem realistic. It annoyed me was too ridiculous for me. Perhaps Hannah sounded so ridiculous to me because she was written by a male author who maybe doesn't get girls and what they sound like and how they feel. I feel like this was more thirteen reasons why of a twelve year old, not an older high schooler. I also realize that Hannah did give up on life halfway or three-quarters of the way through her reasons, but what she did from then on really angered me. She then began to actively seek out terrible situations and place her self in them on purpose, and then yet saying wish it wouldn't have happened or that people would have stopped it. It was really aggravating.

I feel really bad reviewing this book so harshly. I think if it was a normal fluffy book about an insignificant topic, I wouldn't have felt bad. But I feel bad because of the sensitive nature of the topic. But, I guess you can't change your impression of a book so no use feeling bad about it.
58 internautes sur 69 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Disappointing, Underwhelming, Poorly Written 26 juillet 2011
Par Amy from Pittsburgh - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
In his debut novel, Thirteen Reasons Why, Jay Asher submits his entry into the adolescent literature genre that has boasted such modern classics as The Book Thief, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and Speak in the past 15 years. The book is an International best seller and has been translated into 31 languages.

Which is frankly mind-boggling.

The premise is intriguing enough - after killing herself, Hannah Baker sends 13 tapes to 13 different people detailing her story and how each one of them was in some way responsible for her decision to commit suicide. The story is told through Clay Jensen, one of the 13 who receives the tapes and contributes to Hannah's demise. Now that we got through the best part of this book - the summary on the back - let's move on to where it failed, which is everywhere else.

Though the plot does make for an interesting dust jacket read, stylistically, Asher fails. The entire thing reads like chunks of exposition. We are getting Hannah's story in Hannah's voice, through the tapes, through Clay. This choice leads to a feeling of too many degrees of separation, a disconnect between the readers and the girl we're supposed to feel sorry for.

Speaking of Hannah, rather than sympathizing with her, I spent the majority of the book wishing this petulant brat had chosen a more violent end (she only takes pills). The character's tone throughout the novel is spiteful, vindictive, and petty. The girl on the tapes sounds, not like a depressed teenager truly wanting people to understand how their actions affected her, but more as if she just wanted to send all the mean people in high school on massive guilt trips. She takes some sort of perverse, villainous pleasure out of all this; I was picturing her twirling her cartoon mustache. Asher's depiction of a teenage girl is so laughably farcical that it seems as if she was written by someone who gets his views of what high school is like for girls from 90210. The reasons that Hannah kills herself are ridiculous. For an example of this sideshow drama, one of the reasons she commits suicide is because a boy puts her name on a list saying she has a nice ass. I'm not kidding. I think you should just shake that money maker, but apparently this is enough to start the snowball effect that leads to her pill-popping. Moreover, Hannah blames everyone but herself throughout this entire book (eventually saying she made the decision, but still implying or outright stating that other people's roles were in the forefront). I don't know how people see this as inspiring for young adolescents; I walked away from the book thinking more about how Hannah foisted all her issues onto other people rather than how our actions affect those around us. Additionally, I feel this book almost glamorizes suicide - high school girls that want to relate to this self-important drama could possibly view this as romantic. Another poor lesson involves a guidance counselor's reaction to a conversation with Hannah. I find this fictitious encounter neither encouraging, nor likely.

Even the "good" character sucked. Clay is some prototypical nice guy with a sensitive side and all that bull. The dude is just not believably written. Not one character in this book lives and breathes on the page. Instead they all feel one-dimensional; thus, dialogue and would-be emotional scenes fall flat. They also share voices - for example, Asher writes his descriptions the same, regardless of it is Hannah speaking on the tapes or Clay observing something. It got to the point where I was seriously irritated that not one of these characters even had an interesting name. Hannah Baker. Clay Jensen. Justin Foley. Christ.

Put in the hands of a more adept writer, I feel the concept behind this novel could have succeeded. While Asher's most obvious flaw in this effort is his inability to write truly human characters, the writing itself is also dry, and for the most part, emotionless, not exactly the tone I would use in writing about a teenage girl's suicide, but perhaps Asher should write about sociopaths in his next attempt at well-written literature.

I doubt Asher would care about these criticisms. He's laughing all the way to the bank with a giant canvas sack adorned with a dollar sign and filled to the brim with tweeners' allowance money. But if you want a good account of a high school girl who isn't an attention-seeking nitwit and has an actual problem, pick up Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson because I can't think of one reason, let alone thirteen, why you should put time into reading this drivel.
11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 You're Kidding right? 16 mars 2011
Par Mom2Pugs - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat authentifié par Amazon
Someone suggested this book to me. Since I have grown children, maybe I am not in a mind set to understand the dynamics of some of today's teens and the peer pressure they go through. Perhaps in my day, when we got bullied it was far worse then I feel Hannah went through. We dusted ourselves off and started all over again. I understand that some of the things that happened, could have been prevented but her guilt about the events was not enough for me to understand her ending her life. She sounded that there were many underlying problems with her that may have led her to ending her life. When I was a kid we were made fun of, left out of clicks, had reputations etc. we either kicked the crap out of each other or called it a day. I believe Hannah was a coward and weak at best and her biggest guilt of all was leaving her words to haunt all she told on tape. Now that is selfish. I found this book disappointing.
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