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The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying: The Spiritual Classic & International Bestseller: Revised and Updated Edition [Format Kindle]

Sogyal Rinpoche , Patrick D. Gaffney , Andrew Harvey
3.3 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (3 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

From Publishers Weekly

A clear pool of practical wisdom, this rewarding modern reinterpretation of the classic Tibetan Book of the Dead is a manual on learning to accept death, on caring for the dying, and on spiritual growth. Rinpoche, a Tibetan Buddhist teacher who has lived in the West since 1971, maintains that innermost consciousness, rather than an unchanging soul or ego, survives the death of the body. He draws parallels between contemporary Western near-death experiences and the afterlife journey through the bardos, or intermediate planes between death and rebirth, described in sacred Tibetan texts. Bardos, he further argues, are junctures that also occur continually throughout life, opportunities for liberation present in ordinary daily experiences, in sleep and dreams. Rinpoche outlines a path of spiritual transformation that involves meditation, strengthening of positive karma, compassion, generosity and mental exercises. 25,000 ad/promo; author tour.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying interprets Tibetan Buddhism and its views on the afterlife. "Fear of death and ignorance of the afterlife are fueling the destruction of our planet," asserts Rinpoche. Indeed, Western people are taught to deny and fear death. The wisdom of Buddha, however, states that life and death are one entity. Death is a mirror through which the whole of life is reflected. Rinpoche explains the Buddhist philosophy of death in simple yet dynamic terms and tells us how we can transform our lives, prepare for death, and help the dying by employing these beliefs. The underlying theme is that preparing for and accepting our finitude help us to live more responsible and productive lives. The text is ably read by Rinpoche and Lisa Brewer, Charles Tart, and Michael Toms. Recommended for academic libraries.
Ravonne A. Green, Emmanuel Coll. Lib., Franklin Springs, Ga.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Commentaires en ligne

3.3 étoiles sur 5
3.3 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Très intéressant ! 16 juillet 2010
Par M. Mathot
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Bien que ce livre soit une véritable brique à lire, il se lit le plus facilement et le plus simplement du monde... L'auteur analyse notre comportement vis à vis de la mort, de par notre façon de vivre et remet la société en question par rapport à nos croyances. Des comparaisons sont parfois faites avec les traditions tibétaines et les croyances. Ce livre est une très belle source d'inspiration pour qui cherche à donner plus de signification à sa vie ou souhaite se confronter à d'autres manières de penser.
Il y a de nombreuses références aux pratiques bouddhistes, mais l'auteur ne pousse aucunement quoi que ce soit sur le lecteur. Ce livre m'a aidé dans le choix de la pratique régulière du bouddhisme et m'a aidé à m'orienter vers le Mahayana.
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 VITAL ! 28 novembre 2012
Par alrokuo
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I had read the French version from a library and I had been impressed by the style and the knowledge of the author. Yet, it is easy to fall back into old habits and to forget about our need to change and to let down our tyranical ego. It has now become my Bible and my guide !
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0 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 déçue... 18 mars 2014
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Le livre est mal broché, les pages ne sont pas bien découpées, l'écriture est trop petite, l'ensemble est de mauvaise qualité. Je suis déçue de l'avoir commandé pour l'offrir, ce que j'ai quand même fait. Je préfère payer un prix plus élevé et pouvoir tourner les pages avec aisance et le lire grâce à des caractères "normaux".
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Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5  331 commentaires
520 internautes sur 525 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A necessary read for seekers... 23 octobre 2000
Par Quaker Annie - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
My bookshelves are filled with books on many topics, including death and dying and spirituality -- this book might be the only book I really need.
For years I have thought I must read the Tibetan Book of the Dead -- but whenever I tried, it was much too complicated for me to understand.
Sogyal Rinpoche has written this book so that it is easily understood by anyone, even us Westerners, without compromising any of the Buddhist teachings it offers.
In essence, we begin to die the moment we are born. We spend this life preparing to die well. Nothing is permanent, but we spend much of our lives filling our time with activities and pursuits that help us elude ourselves into thinking that what we see and touch is all that matters.
Sogyal Rinpoche says, "To follow the path of wisdom has never been more urgent or more difficult. Our society is dedicated almost entirely to the celebration of ego, with all its sad fantasies about success and power, and it celebrates those very forces of greed and ignorance that are destroying the planet. It has never been more difficult to hear the unflattering voice of the truth, and never more difficult, once having heard it, to follow it: because there is nothing in the world around us that supports our choice, and the entire society in which we live seems to negate every idea of sacredness or eternal meaning. So at the time of our most acute danger, when our very future is in doubt, we as human beings find ourselves at our most bewildered, and trapped in a nightmare of our own creation."
He writes about the importance of realizing the interconnectedness of all living beings (including nature), of meditation (and gives instructions and advice), of finding and being devoted to a good master (something very difficult for Westerners to accept -- he acknowledges that there are fraudulent ones about), of learning to live and learning to die, of letting go of egos and becoming egolessness. Throughout the book, he tells of female masters as well as males, something female readers may greatly appreciate.
Sogyal Rinpoche is from Tibet, and speaks of the cruelty of the Chinese to the Tibetan Buddhists (very similar to the persecution of the early christians, and later the Jews by the Nazis -- when will we ever learn, but then that's the point of this book!)
In the last section of the book, he speaks of "The Universal Process" which is about spirituality, living and dying of all humans, regardless of race, spiritual beliefs, gender or national origin. There are in the back two mantras with explanations and he shares photographs of his beloved masters. Throughout the book are inspiring poems from such poets as Rumi and St. Francis of Assisi, as well as Buddhists. In the very back he gives suggested readings, and offers phone numbers and addresses of Rigpa National Office, where those who are interested can find referrals to cources and study groups in the US, Canada and around the world.
This book is a very good place for the seeker to begin. For those curious about Buddhism, or seriously interested in becoming a Buddha or a Buddhist, or just looking for more thoughts and information on death and dying, this book is excellent, easy to understand, thought-provoking.
180 internautes sur 184 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Extremely Useful. 19 septembre 2002
Par harendra desai - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
Whenever I read a book, I generally use highlighter and underliner to mark the sentences and words that convey the true meaning and essence of what the author wants to say. While reading The Tibetan Book of Living And Dying, I had to stop using the highlighter after a few pages only as the most of the words on each page were worthy of being highlighted. Indeed, the author has said so much precious on every page that a reader must read and re-read the book and with every reading she/he gets more and more knowing.The subject of death has been most puzzling and perplexing to humankind since the time immemorial. The Eastern way of looking at the death as only a 'transition' is explained by the author in a profoundly simple manner. The book certainly helps one to understand the true meaning of the phenomena called death. This understanding helps one to reduce the irrational fear of death. From the lives of the great men and women we know that those who 'lived' a life can only meet the 'death' with equnimity. Thus the author has first taught the art of 'living'. It is only through right type of living that we can 'live' the death also.
I suggest that this book be read by all the Buddhist as well as by non buddhists also. Every one who reads it will find something for him/her.
I salute Sogyal Rinpoche for giving us a wonderful gift of THE TIBETAN BOOK OF LIVING AND DYING.
123 internautes sur 129 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A classic 20 décembre 2002
Par "tess73" - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
After reading other reviews, I feel it might help to say this:
Yes, there is quite a substantial amount of Tibetan ritual encased in this book. But that shouldn't be a surprise, or a hindrance - it IS the "TIBETAN Book of Living and Dying", and not the "Generically Believable For Everyone, Book of Living And Dying".
With that in mind, I loved reading this book. From the first page, I was drawn into a world where compassion and mindfulness reign, and it's these tools that will help us face the inevitable truth that we *are* all going to die, at some point.
Rinpoche skillfully shares his own wisdom, that of many other masters, and anecdotal evidence of what may happen when we physically die, and the stages we may go through during the process.
Topics discussed include the Bardo states, reincarnation, the concept of karma, and fear of the unknown. The book is very readable, and covers the material therein with sensitivity and warmth. At times, it may be difficult to the average Western mind to grasp the concepts of such things are reincarnation - but as Buddha himself did advise, the goal is to read, absorb and take what YOU find important from the lesson...not to read blindly and accept everything blindly.
To anyone even vaguely interested in Buddhism, death and dying or simply becoming more aware of their own self, this book is an invaluable addition to your library.
Truly a classic.
61 internautes sur 62 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 a lamp post on the road 19 avril 2001
Par "free-your-mind" - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
This book should be read by or to everyone at some point in their lives. It not is not just for the buddhist. As His Holiness, the Dalia Lama explains, no matter what religion you practice the goal is the same: happiness. This book can be an inspiration at all times in life. Once you have read it through once, it is organized in such a way, so one can go back and read certain sections to help along the way. Sogyal Rinpoche captures the essence of his purpose of creating the book when he writes: "to learn how to die, is to learn how to live." That simple statement is a social commentary on the development of modern society and the direction it is heading in. The ageing and dying are quickly isolated and doctors are rarely educated in emotional or spiritual care. Sogyal Rinpoche's proposes a new attidute to those who are in a stage that we all will reach at some point. His beautiful writing style and comforting compassion radiates from the pages themselves. I do not associate myself with any one religion, but consider myself a wanderer following my own road in search for answers, for all those who feel the same, this book can illuminate some of the darkness that surrounds us all who have not yet awakened.
45 internautes sur 46 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 a must for a Buddhist library 31 août 2002
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
This book fully captures the essence of Tibetan Buddhism. I don't claim to be an authority on the subject, but I was born into a Buddhist household that has remained faithful and reverent to both Mahayana and Hiyana traditions of Buddhism. From the information I've had passed on to me by both family and Tibetan Buddhist clergy, this book has never been contradictory to anything lecture I've heard. In fact, everybody seems to recommend it enthusiastically!
Essentially, according to Tibetan Buddhism, the purpose of living is to cultivate the mind and purify the body and soul to prepare for death. Westerners may, at first glance, find this philosophy morbid. However, we must remember that reincarnation is integral to Buddhist text (and most world religions, for that matter; the 'one life' theory is actually relatively new). Death is explained as a transitional period, like the end of a chapter to a book. To waste away ones life is like wasting away all your money without care for the future. Basically, this philosophy heavily emphasizes living in the present with thoughtfulness and offers a plethora of Buddhist insight into life and death. It also stresses the urgency of cultivation in a day and age when we disregard life, old age, and disease as trivial matters and nothing that science cannot combat.
The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying is written by a Rinpoche. For those who are not familiar with Tibetan titles, a Lama is essentially a monk who has abandond wordly comforts for a spiritual pursuit, and a Rinpoche is a recognized reincarnation of an esteemed Lama.
If you are a Buddhist, I highly recommend this book. It is enlightening, insightful, and an absolute must in any Buddhist library. Whether you follow the traditions of Chinese Buddhism, Zen or Chan, take the Amitabha or Guan Yin approach, etc., as a fellow Buddhist to another, you should not go without having this book. It's available in Chinese, as well, for the Buddhists out there who are more adept at Chinese than English.
For seekers, this is a wonderful guide, as well. The best part with any book as wonderful as this is that everytime you read it, you'll find new insight in the words. Beginners and established Buddhists alike will take in much insight.
I also highly recommend this to Buddhists who are unfamiliar with the Tibetan traditions. The Tibetan texts will open a whole new door for you. I know from personal experience, because my mother (who is the spiritual leader of the family) was originally a student of Chinese Buddhism, but after reading this book, our entire family discovered a whole other arena of philosophies that have done nothing but enrich our practices.
So whether you're already a Buddhist wishing to broaden your knowledge, a Buddhist who would like new material to absorb, or a seeker who is just curious of the fundamentals of Tibetan Buddhism, this book is definitely a must.
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