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The Twelve Tribes of Hattie [Format Kindle]

Ayana Mathis
5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (3 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Ruthie
1951
 
Lawrence had just given the last of his money to the numbers man when Hattie called him from a public telephone a few blocks from her house on Wayne Street. Her voice was just audible over the street traffic and the baby’s high wail. “It’s Hattie,” she said, as though he would not recognize her voice. And then, “Ruthie and I left home.” Lawrence thought for a moment that she meant she had a free hour unexpectedly, and he might come and meet them at the park where they usually saw each other.
 
“No,” she’d said. “I packed my things. We can’t . . . we’re not going back.”
 
They met an hour later at a diner on Germantown Avenue. The lunch rush was over, and Hattie was the lone customer. She sat with Ruthie propped in her lap, a menu closed on the table in front of her. Hattie did not look up as Lawrence approached. He had the impression that she’d seen him walk in and had turned her head so as not to appear to be looking for him. A cloth satchel sat on the floor next to her: embroidered, somber hued, faded. A bit of white fabric stuck up through the latch. He felt a rush of tenderness at the sight of the bag flopping on the linoleum.
 
Lawrence lifted the satchel onto the seat as he slid into the booth. He reached across and tickled Ruthie’s cheek with his finger. He and Hattie had never discussed a future seriously. Oh, there had been plenty of sighs and wishes in the afternoon hours after they made love: they had invented an entire life out of what-ifs and wouldn’t-it-be-nices. He looked at her now and realized their daydreams were more real to him than he’d allowed himself to believe.
 
Lawrence wasn’t a man who got hung up on ideals or lofty sentiment; he had lived pragmatically as far as his emotions were concerned. He had a car and nice suits, and he had only infrequently worked for white men. He left his family behind in Baltimore when he was sixteen, and he had built himself up from nothing without any help from anyone. And if he had not been able to save his mother from becoming a mule, at least he had never been one himself. For most of his life, this had seemed like the most important thing, not to be anybody’s mule. Then Hattie came along with all of those children, that multitude of children, and she didn’t have a mark of them on her. She spoke like she’d gone to one of those finishing schools for society Negro girls that they have down south. It was as though she’d been dropped into a life of squalor and indignities that should not have been hers. With such a woman, if he would only try a bit harder, he might become a family man. It is true that he had not met Hattie’s children, but their names— Billups and Six and Bell— were seductive as the names of foreign cities. In his imagination they were not so much children as they were small docile copies of Hattie.
 
“What happened?” he asked Hattie. Ruthie kicked at her swaddling. She looked very like him. The old wives’ tale says babies look like their fathers when they are new to the world. Ruthie was light-skinned like him and Hattie, lighter than August. Of course, Lawrence had not seen Hattie’s other children and could not know that most of them were this same milky tea color.
 
“Did August put his hands on you?” Lawrence asked.
 
“He’s not that kind of man,” she answered sharply.
 
“Anybody is, if his manhood is wounded enough.”
 
Hattie looked at him in alarm.
 
“A lot of men, I mean,” Lawrence said.
 
Hattie turned her face to the window. She would need money—that was certain—and they would be able to spend more time together now that August knew the truth. Lawrence could put her up somewhere. It occurred to him now that his choices were two: run from the diner and never see her again or become, all at once, a man of substance and commitment.
 
“I’m so ashamed,” Hattie said. “I’m so ashamed.”
 
“Hattie, listen to me. Our little baby isn’t anything to be ashamed of.”
 
She shook her head. Later that evening, and for years to come, he would wonder if he had misunderstood her, if her shame wasn’t at having a child with him but something larger that he didn’t understand, and if it wasn’t his failure to grasp this that had doomed them. But in that moment, he thought she only needed convincing, so he talked about renting her a house in Baltimore, where he’d grown up, and how they’d bring her children from Philadelphia and what it would all be like.
 
Hattie’s eyes were red-rimmed, and she kept glancing over Lawrence’s shoulder. He had never seen her so skittish, so in need of him. For the first time, Lawrence felt Hattie was his. This was not proprietary but something all together more profound— he was accountable to her, wonderfully and honorably obliged to take care of her. Lawrence was forty years old. He realized that whatever he’d experienced with other women— lust? infatuation?— had not been love.
 
 Hattie was incredulous. She refused him.
 
“This is our chance,” Lawrence said. “I’m telling you, we won’t ever get over it, we won’t ever forgive ourselves if we don’t do this. Baby.”
 
“But do you still . . . ?” she asked.
 
Lawrence had discussed his gambling in passing. He had told Hattie he made his living for the most part as a porter on the trains, which had been true for a few months many years ago. Hattie’s uncertainty made Lawrence understand that she did not take his gambling as lightly as he had supposed.
 
“I’ll stop,” he said. “I already have, really. It’s just a game or two when it’s slow with the trains.”
 
Hattie wept in heavy wracking sobs that shook her shoulders and upset Ruthie.
 
“I’ll stop,” he said again.
 
Lawrence slid next to Hattie on the banquette. He leaned down and kissed his daughter’s forehead. He kissed Hattie’s temple and her tears and the corner of her mouth. When she calmed, Hattie rested her head on his shoulder.
 
“I couldn’t stand to be a fool a second time,” Hattie said. “I couldn’t stand it.”
 
 
Hattie had hardly spoken during the four- hour drive to Baltimore. Lawrence’s was the only car on the highway— his high beams tunneled along the black road. Such a dark and quiet night, the moon was slim as a fingernail clipping and offered no light. Lawrence accelerated to fifty miles per hour, just to hear the engine rev and feel the car shoot forward. Hattie tensed in the passenger seat.
 
“We’re not too far now.” He reached over and squeezed Ruthie’s fat little leg. “I love you,” Lawrence said. “I love you both.”
 
“She’s a good baby,” Hattie replied.
 
August had named the baby Margaret, but Hattie and Lawrence had decided before her birth that they’d call her Ruth after Lawrence’s mother. When Ruth was nine days old, Hattie brought her to meet Lawrence in a park in his neighborhood.
 
“This is your father,” Hattie said, handing her to Lawrence. The baby fussed—Lawrence was a stranger to her—but he held her until she quieted. “Hush, hush, little Ruthie girl, hush, hush,” he said. Tears rose in his throat when the visit ended and Hattie took the baby back to Wayne Street. In the hours and days until he next saw her, Lawrence thought of Ruthie every instant: now she is hungry, now she is asleep. Now she is cooing in the arms of the man who is not her father. It was possible, of course, that Hattie was mistaken and Ruthie was August’s baby, but Lawrence knew, he knew in a way that was not logical and could not be explained, that she was his child.
 
Lawrence tightened his grip on the steering wheel until his fingers ached. “They never made a car better than the ’44 Buick. I told you it was a smooth ride,” he said. “Didn’t I tell you? I drove this car all the way to Chicago once to see my cousin.”
 
“You told me,” Hattie said.
 
A car passed in the opposite direction. Hattie put her hand over Ruthie’s eyes to shield her from the headlight glare.
 
“You’ll like Baltimore,” Lawrence said. “You’ll see.”
 
He did not know if she would. They were to live in a couple of rooms in a boardinghouse until he could get the money together to rent a house. A place large enough for all Hattie’s children would cost twenty-five dollars a week. Lawrence could make that money easily; he could pull six months’ rent in a single night with a couple of good hands. It wasn’t the money that made him nervous, though he was skinned at the moment.
 
“ ‘As the sparks fly upward . . . ,’ ” Hattie said. “It’s from the Bible,” she added.
 
“Well, that’s dismal. Don’t you remember anything else?” Hattie shrugged.
 
“Guess not,” Lawrence said.
 
He reached over and tapped her playfully on the knee with the back of his hand. She stiffened. “Come on, baby. Come on, let’s try and be a little bit happy. This is a happy occasion, isn’t it?”
 
“I like that verse. It makes me feel like I’m not alone,” Hattie said. She shifted away from him in her seat. “You’re going to pick up more shifts on the railroads, right?” she ask...

Revue de presse

"The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is a vibrant and compassionate portrait of a family hardened and scattered by circumstance and yet deeply a family. Its language is elegant in its purity and rigor. The characters are full of life, mingled thing that it is, and dignified by the writer’s judicious tenderness towards them. This first novel is a work of rare maturity. "
            —Marilynne Robinson

"The Twelve Tribes of Hattie is beautiful and necessary from the very first sentence. The human lives it renders are on every page lowdown and glorious, fallen and redeemed, and all at the same time. They would be too heartbreaking to follow, in fact, were they not observed in such a generous and artful spirit of hope, in a spirit of mercy, in the spirit of love. Ayana Mathis has written a treasure of a novel."
            —Paul Harding

“Writing with stunning authority, clarity, and courage, debut novelist Mathis pivots forward in time, spotlighting intensely dramatic episodes in the lives of Hattie's nine subsequent children (and one grandchild to make the ‘twelve tribes’), galvanizing crises that expose the crushed dreams and anguished legacy of the Great Migration…Mathis writes with blazing insight into the complexities of sexuality, marriage, family relationships, backbone, fraudulence, and racism in a molten novel of lives racked with suffering yet suffused with beauty.”
            —Donna Seaman, Booklist (starred)
 
“Remarkable…Mathis weaves this story with confidence, proving herself a gifted and powerful writer.” 
           —Publishers Weekly (starred)

“Cutting, emotional…pure heartbreak…though Mathis has inherited some of Toni Morrison’s poetic intonation, her own prose is appealingly earthbound and plainspoken, and the book’s structure is ingenious…an excellent debut.”
            —Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 479 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 352 pages
  • Editeur : Cornerstone Digital (20 décembre 2012)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B009A942RY
  • Synthèse vocale : Non activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (3 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°52.278 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Commentaires client les plus utiles
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 entrons dans la famille 1923 1980 1 février 2014
Par jean
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Splendide, bouleversant et parfois amusant ;la version Kindle est irréprochable. Le style est très direct et ça commence très fort :la mort des deux jumeaux Viennent ensuite les voix de Floyd ( le trompettiste), Six ( le prédicateur), Ruthie l' enfant de l' amour avec Lawrence), Ella l' enfant donnée à sa sœur , Alice et Billups ( la servante Eudine brouille le lien entre frère et sueur ), Franklin ( à Saigon et à la maison), Bell (rupture, trahison, mais sa mère veille !), Cassie ( chapitre douloureux et si bien écrit!) et Sala ( la fille de Caddie, et le sermon à l' église!).
Je me souviendrais longtemps de ces personnages.
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A découvrir impérativement 25 avril 2014
Par Nadege
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Elevés par une mère froide et distante qui n'a qu'une volonté en tête, celle d'éduquer ces enfants à la dure réalité de la vie; C'est sous la forme d'un puzzle que l'on découvre les différents enfants d'Hatie et cette douleur qui les unis.
C'est un roman bouleversant
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Une Histoire Bouleversante 25 mai 2015
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Ou plutôt des histoires bouleversantes car dans chaque chapitre on suit un des enfants d'Hattie Shepherd petite noire de 15 ans dans les années 1920 quittant le Sud pour s'établir à Philadelphie. (Mais pas si "noire" que ça car l'auteure nous la décrit comme "high yellow") Ayana Mathis dont ceci est le premier roman a un vrai don pour l'écriture; son style est lyrique, puissant, captivant. (J'ai lu ce roman en 24 heures.) Le premier chapitre avec la mort des jumeaux d'Hattie vous laisse la gorge serrée. Mais l'auteure ne tombe jamais dans le pathos à outrance, malgré les thèmes abordés comme la schizophrénie ou la pédophilie. La fin reste assez ouverte pour que chaque lecteur trouve son compte. Quant à moi j'aurais voulu rester encore longtemps en compagnie de la famille Shepherd.
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 étoiles sur 5  1.419 commentaires
386 internautes sur 414 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Didn't think I'd like it, but I did! 3 décembre 2012
Par Weekly Reader - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit (De quoi s'agit-il?)
Thought this was a bunch of short stories loosely tied together, but it wasn't. It seemed to start out that way and I'm not fond of short stories, but it was actually the story of Hattie from 1925 to 1980. The narration was mostly through her eyes and sometimes through her children's eyes. But it moved along through time and kept the story riveting. Not sure if I liked Hattie, but I certainly sympathized with her. Not sure if I liked all of her children either. But it's really Hattie that the reader gets to know and reluctantly, at least for me, admire.

Ayana Mathis, the author, writes beautifully. She weaves words like a maestro conductor. Her characterizations have depth and the plot has tension and creativity. A slightly different kind of a book, but one that shouldn't be overlooked.
137 internautes sur 148 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Don't Be Fooled By The Hype! 15 janvier 2013
Par Danyw - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
One star means you "hate" the book. Hate is such a strong word that I can say it's a little "over the top" in how I feel about this book, BUT not by much! You ever hear about a book or a specific artist and feel this overwhelming pressure that You Must Like It or you're not civilized or "cultured enough". I have felt this way before (shout out to Esperanza Spalding) and once again found myself saying I must love this book if Oprah and Essence says so. I mean I'm an African American woman born and raised in Philadelphia how can I not love this book.
At first, I must admit I was smitten, yes each chapter ended abruptly, with no sense of closure just doom and gloom or a feeling of What The... But I kept thinking "It's got to get better and Mathis is surely going to get back to these characters. By 60% into the book (for all my fellow Kindle readers out there) I was more than annoyed and was wondering what is the point to all this misery. By the time I got to the "Bell" chapter I was "speed reading" through each click of my Kindle. A friend of mine, who also read this book and had the same reaction as I did said the book should be called "What Happen...to the Twelve Tribes of Hattie?" If someone out there does know, they sure didn't find out from reading this book.
Mathis needs to find her "voice" as a writer and pick a lane while she is at it. Putting everything in a book including the kitchen sink does not make for a fascinating read. Also to Mathis CLOSURE is a good thing you should try it out in your next book.
176 internautes sur 200 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Misandry on display 12 décembre 2012
Par Read-A-Lot - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
The writing here is indeed superb, but the story is a bit disjointed and the treatment of black males in this novel is absolutely horrendous. Here is a quote from USA Today, "With one or two exceptions, the male characters in this book make Alice Walker's The Color Purple read like a celebration of the strong black man." That comes from a woman, and those exceptions she mentions are fleeting at best.

The book starts off with a painful experience, but the writing and situation draws you in immediately. From that opening chapter it seems like everything goes downhill. Hattie never seems to quite recover from this event. Her husband August, is nowhere to be found during this calamity. The subsequent chapters are told from the 12 different children's perspective with varying degrees of effectiveness. Some of the chapters feel unconnected to the book as a whole, predicaments are mentioned and then never followed up on.

I know this book and author have already been anointed as the next big thing, and based on her prose I do understand why. I could only go 3 stars because the misandry was suffocating, and I sincerely hope that doesn't account for all the attention this novel has garnered, I would find that very disappointing.
37 internautes sur 41 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 It's good but not great 15 décembre 2012
Par E Nicole - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
Overall it was a decent book with stronger portions and good writing throughout most of the book. I did enjoy the author's use of Hattie's children and grandchildren to tell Hattie's story but through all of that I still don't think I really fully understood what made Hattie tick and why she was so distant and cold. A heartbreaking loss is referenced early in the book but they way the author describes her, it seems that Hattie was this way even before the loss. It made it hard for me to empathize with her character. I felt more for her children if anything.

Each chapter is basically a short story and some were more enjoyable than others. Some of the weaker chapters did not seem to connect back to Hattie or the other chapters from the other children later. I skimmed a chapter that I found uninteresting but I was able to read the following chapters without being confused. There were some chapters about some of the children that I think would make great novels by themselves, such as the story of her son Six who moves to the South to become a preacher or her daughter Belle. The main thing I wanted more of was a better connection of all the children and Hattie through the chapters. That is what is missing most.
81 internautes sur 95 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Absolutely Captivating 7 décembre 2012
Par Karen B - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
How I love this book! The characters are so alive, the emotions are so real. I often had to stop, re-read a sentence and then just sit there to reflect as I ached for the lives of Hattie and her family. Or I would re-read to savor again a particular passage. Ms. Mathis writes with poetic beauty and a great storytelling style. She skillfully portrays the complexity of the human spirit and presents the characters with love and respect...even when they are behaving badly you can see the fragility of their souls. This would be a wonderful book club book. I plan to immediately read it again and recommend it to everyone. (I could have done without the Oprah notes, though.)
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