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Uncle Tom's Cabin (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Harriet Beecher Stowe

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Extrait

Late in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sitting alone
over their wine, in a well-furnished dining parlor, in the town of P—, in Kentucky.
There were no servants present, and the gentlemen, with chairs closely
approaching, seemed to be discussing some subject with great earnestness.

For convenience sake, we have said, hitherto, two gentlemen. One of the parties,
however, when critically examined, did not seem, strictly speaking, to come under
the species. He was a short, thick-set man, with coarse, commonplace features, and
that swaggering air of pretension which marks a low man who is trying to elbow his
way upward in the world. He was much over-dressed, in a gaudy vest of many
colors, a blue neckerchief, bedropped gayly with yellow spots, and arranged with a
flaunting tie, quite in keeping with the general air of the man. His hands, large and
coarse, were plentifully bedecked with rings; and he wore a heavy gold
watch-chain, with a bundle of seals of portentous size, and a great variety of colors,
attached to it,—which, in the ardor of conversation, he was in the habit of
flourishing and jingling with evident satisfaction. His conversation was in free and
easy defiance of Murray's Grammar, and was garnished at convenient intervals with
various profane expressions, which not even the desire to be graphic in our account
shall induce us to transcribe.

His companion, Mr. Shelby, had the appearance of a gentleman; and the
arrangements of the house, and the general air of the housekeeping, indicated easy,
and even opulent circumstances. As we before stated, the two were in the midst of
an earnest conversation.

'That is the way I should arrange the matter,' said Mr. Shelby.

'I can't make trade that way—I positively can't, Mr. Shelby,' said the other, holding
up a glass of wine between his eye and the light.

'Why, the fact is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow; he is certainly worth that sum
anywhere—steady, honest, capable, manages my whole farm like a clock.'

'You mean honest, as niggers go,' said Haley, helping himself to a glass of brandy.

'No; I mean, really, Tom is a good, steady, sensible, pious fellow. He got religion at
a camp-meeting, four years ago; and I believe he really did get it. I've trusted him,
since then, with everything I have,—money, house, horses,—and let him come and
go round the country; and I always found him true and square in everything.'

'Some folks don't believe there is pious niggers, Shelby,' said Haley, with a candid
flourish of his hand, 'but I do. I had a fellow, now, in this yer last lot I took to
Orleans—'twas as good as a meetin', now, really, to hear that critter pray; and he was
quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a good sum, too, for I bought him cheap
of a man that was 'bliged to sell out; so I realized six hundred on him. Yes, I consider
religion a valeyable thing in a nigger, when it's the genuine article, and no mistake.'

'Well, Tom's got the real article, if ever a fellow had,' rejoined the other. 'Why, last
fall, I let him go to Cincinnati alone, to do business for me, and bring home five
hundred dollars. 'Tom,' says I to him, 'I trust you, because I think you're a
Christian—'I know you wouldn't cheat.' Tom comes back, sure enough; I knew he
would. Some low fellows, they say, said to him—'Tom, why don't you make tracks
for Canada?' 'Ah, master trusted me, and I couldn't'—they told me about it. I am sorry
to part with Tom, I must say. You ought to let him cover the whole balance of the
debt; and you would, Haley, if you had any conscience.'

'Well, I've got just as much conscience as any man in business can afford to
keep,—just a little, you know, to swear by, as 'twere,' said the trader, jocularly; 'and
then, I'm ready to do anything in reason to 'blige friends; but this yer, you see, is a
leetle too hard on a fellow—a leetle too hard.' The trader sighed contemplatively, and
poured out some more brandy.

'Well, then, Haley, how will you trade?' said Mr. Shelby, after an uneasy interval of
silence.

'Well, haven't you a boy or gal that you could throw in with Tom?'

'Hum!—none that I could well spare; to tell the truth, it's only hard necessity makes
me willing to sell at all. I don't like parting with any of my hands, that's a fact.'

Here the door opened, and a small quadroon boy, between four and five years of
age, entered the room. There was something in his appearance remarkably beautiful
and engaging. His black hair, fine as floss silk, hung in glossy curls about his
round, dimpled face, while a pair of large dark eyes, full of fire and softness, looked
out from beneath the rich, long lashes, as he peered curiously into the apartment. A
gay robe of scarlet and yellow plaid, carefully made and neatly fitted, set off to
advantage the dark and rich style of his beauty; and a certain comic air of
assurance, blended with bashfulness, showed that he had been not unused to
being petted and noticed by his master.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

From AudioFile

Using a mixture of clearly distinguished voices, Ricco Ross brings Southern accents, Negro dialects, and another era to life in this rendering of UNCLE TOM'S CABIN. Listeners can almost see the young Negro quadroons, Jim Crow, and Topsy, who says, "I just growed," when asked when and where she was born. While Ricco portrays the ugly slave master, Simon Legree, with menacing tones of cruelty, he switches to sounds of compassion and grace with Uncle Tom. Ricco depicts the barbarisms of slave trading in which men, women, and children are bought and sold like livestock with chilling reality. This timeless classic is worth revisiting. G.D.W. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 728 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 411 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 161949003X
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Illimité
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B0084B1OUM
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • : Non activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°1.364 des titres gratuits dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 gratuits dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5  1.075 commentaires
14 internautes sur 14 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Sobering still 8 juillet 2014
Par Michael B. Grant - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I have heard about this book my whole life but never understood what it was about. If, like me you make the assumption that it is a book about a slave that "sells out his own race", which is the definition of Uncle Tom that I gathered by looking at television and hearing the term used, you will surely miss the entire point of this book. Instead, the book is about a slave that is steadfast in his beliefs and principles. A man that holds on to his faith in Jesus. I really don't get the common use of the term after reading this.

Every one should read this book. It can be a hard read as it is a glimpse into a dark period in history.
16 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Excellent book 19 avril 2013
Par Nikii Whitehead - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
In reading this book you either fall in love and empathize with the characters or truly dislike the characters. It is hard to get into this book because of the strange dialect. Do not let this stop you. I promise you will enjoy if you continue reading.
14 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A captivating story! 17 avril 2013
Par Deborah - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
The book catches the attention of the reader from the beginning. But throughout I kept wondering why this book brought about such a stir for change. Though the stories told by the writer were accurate accounts of the times I'm sure, I kept thinking they were too mild a depiction of the atrocities that had actually occurred. I kept thinking "how could such a timid account of the institution of slavery have stirred our nation so?" I wondered, "where is the grotesque, the horrors, why am I reading a happily ever after accounting of such an awful institution. To be sure this was not what I was expecting to read. This couldn't be the book history has claimed to have stirred our country to begin to finally consider the abolition of such a horrible scourge afflicting the nation.

Then I get to the last Chapter where our author brings to account both the North and the South. Both are held responsible, both are guilty. The South for carrying out the atrocities and the North for standing by allowing it to continue. But our author didn't stop there. She went on to throw blame and guilt on the leaders of Christianity for twisting God's Word to justify the actions of both North and South. Both sides could not be right and the treatment of slaves in the North was not what it should have been if one believed in the Word of God. After reading the last Chapter I applaud Harriet Beecher Stowe for having the courage to write such a book in such a trying time as our nation was living then. She was truly a woman of courage and inspiration. I wish I had read this years ago and I highly recommend it to all who are interested in the history of this country.
10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 To All Who Love Honor & Integrity 20 avril 2013
Par MaryLee - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I cannot for the life of me understand why this book should not be read. I think Uncle Tom represents all who value integrity. I loved the light that shines in this book. May we all help in our own way those who need our help.
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 It is a complement to be called an "Uncle Tom" 24 mai 2014
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
The lesson I learned is that Uncle Tom is to be compared to Job. His faith rose above the devastation wrought by slavery. He did not give in to the cruelty of Simon Legree and remained faithful to Christian principles throughout the story. He was a true leader. It is through ignorance of his character that a person who is weak or servile is called an "Uncle Tom". The truth is just the opposite. Stowe was masterful at affecting my emotions and bringing out feelings for people who wound up slaves. It is mind boggling to envision the plantation owner having mixed children and then selling or trading them as slaves. This book has given me an insight to the plight of the African-American today. America did destroy a race of people and has not paid its debt to them, and maybe never can.
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