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Unknown Pleasures: Inside Joy Division (Anglais) Broché – 25 avril 2013


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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

'The most colourful and intimate account of Joy Division ever written' MOJO
'Genuinely funny: indeed, the story will… keep you entertained for a very long time' Sunday Times
'Hook has restored a flesh-and-blood rawness to what was becoming a standard tale. Few pop music books manage that' Guardian

Présentation de l'éditeur

'Genuinely funny: indeed, the story will… keep you entertained for a very long time' Sunday Times
Joy Division changed the face of music. Godfathers of the current alternative scene, they reinvented rock in the post-punk era, creating a new sound - dark, hypnotic, intense - that would influence U2, Morrissey, R.E.M., Radiohead and many others. This is the story of Joy Division told by the band's legendary bassist, Peter Hook.
'Hook has restored a flesh-and-blood rawness to what was becoming a standard tale. Few pop music books manage that' Guardian
'An honest, enthusiastic account … It's a window like no other into the reality of life in this most aloof of bands' METRO
'An immense account of Joy Division's rise…Having read Hook's book, you'll feel like you were the fifth member of the band' GQ
'A bittersweet, profanity filled recollection… If you like Joy Division, you really have to read it' Q Magazine
'Hook lifts the lid on the real Ian Curtis' NME
'He's frank, incredibly funny, and isn't shy' Artrocker


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Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 352 pages
  • Editeur : Simon & Schuster (25 avril 2013)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 1849833605
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849833608
  • Dimensions du produit: 13 x 19,8 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (2 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 29.972 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Alexis Naline le 4 septembre 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Ecrit dans un anglais relativement simple, la lecture de ce livre me semble incontournable pour quiconque s'intéresse un tant soit peu à Joy Division.
On y apprend plus sur le groupe que dans le livre de Deborah Curtis, qui était bien plus axé -et pour cause- sur Ian Curtis.
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Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Un livre très marrant dans lequel on apprend beaucoup sur ce groupe mythique et le destin tragique du génie troublé Ian Curtis.
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Amazon.com: 81 commentaires
22 internautes sur 23 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A terrific book 17 novembre 2012
Par Stephen Barrow - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle
Peter Hook has written a very good book - the funny, touching and ultimately tragic story of Joy Division. What shines through is Mr Hook's anti-rock star humanity - his basic modesty,his justifiable pride in JD's achievements (including his own considerable contribution), his continuing admiration for his now-estranged band mates, and the terrible impact of the death of his friend Ian Curtis. Peter Hook often describes himself as a yobbo in these pages: on this evidence he's anything but that.
40 internautes sur 47 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
In-depth review: full of sound and fury 29 janvier 2013
Par John L Murphy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle
Bassist Peter Hook tells his band's tale of sound and fury. Told not by a madman, but a droll, deadpan participant-observer, this long saga of Joy Division's short span signifies far from nothing. The four members transcended prog, metal, or glam: they pioneered post-punk.

A conventional rock-star bio's touchstones don't weigh this punchy, profane narrative down. (I reviewed an advance e-galley.) While a quick dramatis personae precedes his band narrative, and timelines intersperse comments on gigs, album tracks, and studio work with chatty chapters narrating the band's fortunes, Hook shepherds us rapidly along as punk bursts and fades as quickly into a cold future.

They blunder on in a grim British environment. They may come back from a gig at six in the morning only to go to work at seven. This unpretentious narrative conveys what the "tone-deaf" bassist knows and the band's fans want to learn, but it strips away digressions. It may dash ahead here and there into New Order or current d.j.-related territory, but these detours branch from the musical path blazed from the late-1970s onward under a thoughtful if cranky, wry guide. Hook relies upon an understated, efficient, and acerbic tone, as if he's sharing his reflections and memories with you at his corner pub.

Brisk episodes in declarative form convey the chronology. Seeing the Sex Pistols first play Manchester in June 1976, Hooky, Bernard, and Terry (Mason, their longtime associate) had shorn their locks, razored their thrift-store gear, and vowed to follow Johnny Rotten's commitment to a wall of distortion, a fierce integrity, and a musical vision that transcended the limits of punk. Steve Morris eventually joins, adding his jazz-based drumming to the self-taught core: the spare guitar of Barney and Peter on his three-fingered bass.

The band never gelled as best friends. Three roles tangled Ian: a lad, a literate lyricist, and a married father carrying on an affair. Barney bickered with his boyhood pal Hooky. Steve kept to himself. But, as musicians, the trio energized Curtis' adroit lyricism, and riffs tumbled forth, from "Transmission" on, by mid-1978, a year after they first played in public.

First as Stiff Kittens, then Warsaw, finally Joy Division, they vowed to outflank the divisive D.I.Y. Mancunian scene. Then, they stumbled upon their own sound. Hooky's cheap amp forced him to play high on the neck of his bass; Ian liked this as Barney's "low chords" rode over Steve's "jungle drums"; manager Rob Gretton approved, and they honed their style.

Starting with the insistent "Transmission," Hook commends Curtis: "His songs from that point were like having a conversation with a genius, sort of profound and impenetrable at the same time." The band wisely steered free of London, staying with Tony Wilson and Factory Records. Driven by the tape skills and psychic manipulations of their manic, experimental producer Martin Hannett, they plumbed icy depths (often in frigid rehearsal spaces) for their accomplished 1979 debut LP Unknown Pleasures.

For this bleak, defiant album, despite all of the tension "sniggering" Hannett created and exacerbated, Peter credits this producer with steering himself and Bernard away from a "metal wall" to what Ian and Steve preferred along with Martin: not "RARRGH!" but a "ptish" from its "spacey, echoey ambient sound." This conveyed what few records from any era sustain: the gift of "timelessness."

Soon, the press noticed. "One minute you're playing to a handful of people yawning their heads off, then six months or eight months later you're playing the exact same material to a packed audience all going bonkers." The second half of Hook's narrative mingles lighter and darker moods as the band found success (albeit limited as they still had to decide on whether to spend their £1.50 per diem on a meal or two pints, but not both).

Hooky rises to the challenge here, mixing the fond if foul-mouthed, often funny vignettes with the painful revelations. His insights into his conflicted, boisterous, and wayward companion emerge through plainspoken, compassionate, and blunt evaluations.

Ian's recently diagnosed epilepsy worsened with exposure to strobes onstage; his barbiturate addiction to counter his ailment increased his difficulties leading to a separation from his wife Debbie (and their infant daughter Natalie) during Ian's affair with Annik Honoré. Hooky laments the band's inability to solve Curtis' predicament. "Selfishness, stupidity, willful ignorance, and a refusal to accept what was going on right in front of our noses--we were all guilty of it, even Ian." But, as working-class jokers all of twenty-two, bent on pranks and taking down any pretentiousness which increasingly Ian and Annik indulged in, Hooky and his restive mate Barney "carried on" for the sake of the band and for lack of any alternative method of treating Ian. "Because this was what we'd worked and waited for."

What they waited for happened. The second album Closer as "the soundtrack" to Curtis' pain solidified their popularity. The aftermath, foreshadowed and familiar by now, remains poignant.

"It took me a long time to realize that a child had lost a father, a mother and father had lost a son, a sister had lost a brother, a wife had lost a husband, a mistress had lost a lover. All a lot more important than me and the band; we pale in significance." Hook wonders about Curtis' enigma: "on the one hand, he was ill and vulnerable; on the other, he was a screaming rock god." By taking Ian Curtis down to his own level, Peter Hook provides his mate with a fitting tribute, neither sordid nor facile, pat nor pandering.

Hook's maturation may have taken long, but the honesty with which he accounts for his confusion then and his insights now wrestles movingly and boldly with contradictions. Unknown Pleasures as a book meets the challenge of the album, and the music Joy Division crafted: it enters the void but survives the plunge valiantly.
11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Pleasures and Pain 26 février 2013
Par J. Reeves - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Very engaging. enjoyable, often very funny and also quite sad as there is a pall hanging over the story. Peter Hook writes in an intimate yet not so personal way. He's a natural story teller. I found the book revelatory in that it captures the excitement and some of the glamour and youthful exuberance of being in a band discovering and developing themselves while at the same time de-glamourizes the whole thing with the wonderful often foul mouthes english humor along with describing the conditions of touring and recording that only the young could put up with. These guys did what they did for the sheer hell of it, and that at least to me is what rock and roll (and all its sub-genres) are about. It's hard not to wonder what may have been but they certainly made their mark during their short existence. I have always been a fan of Joy Division (I still remember hearing them the first time and sensing it was them from all that I had heard and read) , and come away from their story more impressed with their music and legacy. Just a very well written book. Absolutely worth reading for any Joy Division fan, plus any fan curious about a very influential band not that well-known except by aficionados and also for anyone curious about what it really is like to be in a band trying to develop their abilities along the way, while also just surviving (for most anyway) along the way of them shooting for success.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
First Person Real! 4 octobre 2013
Par David B - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Not a pro writer. Not a ghost writer. Just a bloke talking about his mates. Brilliant read. Hook takes the reader inside and makes them a part of the real history rather than the mythology. Kudos Hooky!
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Thoroughly enjoyable 18 mars 2013
Par Amber - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
I have read many books about my favorite band, Joy Division, so I did not expect to learn anything new from this book, but I was wrong! Hookie captures the essence of Ian's personality in a way that makes me think differently of him. Ian was a buddy, one of the guys, a jokester, NOT the depressive melancholy man he has been made out to be in the press. His demons were deeply internalized and surfaced through his music, not his behavior. I was also surprised to learn of the difficulties the guys had after starting New Order. New Order are such an incredibly unique and solid band, I never would have thought that the guys mostly did not get along, and that they all had tremendous doubts about the project as a whole. I would recommend this book to fans of Joy Division and New Order alike.
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