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War Crimes for the Home (Anglais) Relié – 8 juillet 2002


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Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 240 pages
  • Editeur : Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (8 juillet 2002)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0747559694
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747559696
  • Dimensions du produit: 23,2 x 15,8 x 2,8 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 1.806.567 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Amazon Customer le 8 mars 2010
Format: Relié
Just couldn't put this book down. Liz Jensen is a wonderful writer who makes you laugh and cry at every moment.
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Amazon.com: 5 commentaires
10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
War and humour 9 juin 2003
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
This was a book I could just not put down. I initially thought I could `read' the plot but every page had a twist or turn. Jumping back and forward in time from the war years to the present day, the author was able to reproduce the atmosphere I both settings. I felt empathy with all characters at some stage, the humour and sensitivity in which the whole story was unfolded makes it a wonderful masterpiece. I could read this book time and again.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
"If you dig deep enough, all our secrets are the same." 26 octobre 2005
Par Jana L. Perskie - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Liz Jensen's highly unusual novel, "War Crimes for the Home," is filled with dark humor, grim realities, haunting glimpses of a bygone age, and canny insights into the pathos which reigned over English lives during WWII. The author's somewhat surrealistic narrative depicts and explores one woman's wartime experiences, the repercussions of her actions, and the impact these incidents will have on her and those she loves throughout their lifetimes.

The blitz has begun and Gloria Winstanley is fighting and trying to survive the women's war, along with her sister Marje. Pure Cockneys, both of them, (although their folks moved down to Bristol when they were young), their battles are far different, less dramatic, from those of the men - the soldiers. The two young women, like millions of others, do not risk getting shot out of the sky nightly, or wait for days to be rescued from life boats after their ships sink under them, nor do they directly participate in crucial battles. "We queued for potatoes, and we went to the flicks and we heard bombs fall so often it was background noise, you didn't even bother to stop what you were doing when the Moaning Minnies started up, you just go on with your business, even if you was bombed out again and again and again like Mrs. Blathershite O'Malley. My war is a tiny little war compared to some. But mine stayed with me, and the things it made me do, they stayed with me too, but hidden."

Gloria, as narrator, makes life in early 1940's England come alive - with its influx of gorgeous Yank soldiers and fly-boys, the pubs and clubs, jitterbugging, jazz and bebop, the cool slang of the period and the much looser mores that prevailed during wartime, when one had to grab what one could of life and hold-on tight. One lived for the moment because all too frequently, that was all there was. Of course there are and were consequences to living life on the edge. And sometimes when the consequences of one's deeds are too difficult to bear, they are repressed, forgotten, out of the need to maintain sanity. Way before anything worth forgetting occurs here, however, life is happening (!!), often bringing as much fun as danger. Both Gloria and Marje work in a munitions factory. Their mother died from cancer, their father is a prisoner of war in Japan. So, they're on their own - two beautiful blondes with no supervision or chaperone...and the times are wild and wooly! So are they! So are the Yanks!

Marje's fiance Bobby, a fighter pilot, is frequently absent, leaving her bored but relatively faithful. Gloria has herself a hunky Yank boyfriend, Ron, from Chicago, a glamorous city, at least according to the movies. Ron seduces Gloria with the usual sweet talk and promises of marriage. He woos her with gifts - cans of syrupy peaches - the epitome of luxury for sugar-starved Brits. The food shortages are terrible. One special evening Ron invites Gloria to the theater to see the Great Zedorro, a hypnotist whose specialty is Mind Control. Gloria volunteers to be his subject, and ends up on stage demonstrating how effective the powers of suggestion can be. From this encounter with the hypnotist, and her seduction by Ron, a series of events are set in motion which will only be resolved years later when Gloria will be forced to confront her past.

The story is told through a series of flashbacks. When the novel opens, Gloria (formerly Winstanley, now Taylor), is no longer a vibrant, sexy young woman. She's a cranky, cantankerous old lady who tells off-color jokes and maintains the right to have a sex life. She has Alzheimers, (along with some selective memory loss), and remembers little of the past and less of the present. She will have sudden, extremely vivid flashes of long-term memory recall and be able to lucidly discuss events from fifty years before. Since she is the narrator, the reader wanders with her through the maze that is her mind. She has just been operated on for her duodenum, and her beloved son Hank and his wife have put her in a nursing home to recover. Descriptions of Sea View, the old person's home where she is confined, along with some of its other inhabitants, are priceless - really wonderful. Hank, who was raised without a father, knows almost nothing of his mother's life before he was born, although he has questioned her at length about the past on various occasions, even before the onset of senile dementia. He knows almost nothing of his father or extended family - if he has one. Then one day a woman shows up claiming to be Gloria's daughter.

This is the tale of one tough lady who tells it like it is and is determined to have some of the good stuff life offers. The mystery here has more to do with finding the pieces of a lifetime's puzzle, and assembling them, rather than discovering who committed a crime. The puzzle is every bit as riveting as the most intriguing conundrum.

Ms. Jensen has written a gripping, raw, hilariously funny account of English life on the Home Front during the country's most trying days. I think this version represents reality more than the romanticized interpretations we often see in films and read about in fiction. And Gloria Winstanley Taylor is a once-in-a-lifetime heroine. Warning: Not for the thin-skinned. Highly recommended.
JANA
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Hilarious and Touching 12 avril 2005
Par Mary Lins - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I "discovered" Liz Jensen with her recent novel, "The Ninth Life of Louis Drax", and have been devouring her earlier novels as fast as I can. I couldn't put down "War Crimes for the Home". It's laugh-out-loud funny, but also a compelling mystery, and a touching story of love and loss. I dare anyone to get to know protagonist, Gloria, without in turns loving her and wanting to strangle her.

Jensen's wonderful satiric skill rivals Fay Weldon. Those Brits sure can twist in the irony knife, too. Brava!
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A great little story 31 août 2006
Par Helen Simpson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Although I wanted to dislike Gloria for her courseness and low morals I couldn't. She was rather a sad character, yet at times made me laugh by her bluntness and the way she described others.

Although I'm sure that this is not how the majority of girls behaved during the war, I'm equally sure that some did. It was a poignant and honest description of how people must have felt in times of war when you never knew if you'd see someone again whether it be your boyfriend/father/brother on a bombing mission or your neighbour in a bombing raid.

Some of the descriptions reminded me of stories my parents and grandparents have spoken of; dying your legs with tea and trying to draw a straight seam up the back of your leg, food rationing, the Americans being 'over paid, over sexed and over here' and even the term "mind your own beeswax" rang a bell.

I think Jenson managed really well to capture what it must be like to be old and living in a nursing home, feeling old one minute but still caught up in your memories that make you always remain young.
A great little story. 4 juillet 2006
Par Helen Simpson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Although I wanted to dislike Gloria for her courseness and low morals I couldn't. She was rather a sad character, yet at times made me laugh by her bluntness and the way she described others.

Although I'm sure that this is not how the majority of girls behaved during the war, I'm equally sure that some did. It was a poignant and honest description of how people must have felt in times of war when you never knew if you'd see someone again whether it be your boyfriend/father/brother on a bombing mission or your neighbour in a bombing raid.

Some of the descriptions reminded me of stories my parents and grandparents have spoken of; dying your legs with tea and trying to draw a straight seam up the back of your leg, food rationing, the Americans being 'over paid, over sexed and over here' and even the term "mind your own beeswax" rang a bell.

I think Jenson managed really well to capture what it must be like to be old and living in a nursing home, feeling old one minute but still caught up in your memories that make you always remain young.
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