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Why Is Sex Fun?: The Evolution Of Human Sexuality [Format Kindle]

Jared Diamond
5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)

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Format Kindle, 25 septembre 1998 EUR 8,11  
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Broché EUR 12,74  
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Descriptions du produit

Amazon.com

Many of us pursue fitness because we want to remain attractive to partners and potential partners, and we stay healthy so we can continue to have sex with those partners. But why do people care so much about sex? This book, written by an evolutionary biologist, explains how all the weird quirks of human sexuality came to be: sex with no intention of procreation, invisible fertility, sex acts pursued in private--all common to us, but very different from most other species. Why Is Sex Fun? asks us to look at ourselves in a brand-new way, and richly rewards us for doing so.

From Library Journal

This book speculates on the evolutionary forces that shaped the unique aspects of human sexuality: female menopause, males' role in society, having sex in private, and?most unusual of all?having sex for fun instead of for procreation. Through comparative evolution, biologist and science author Diamond (Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fate of Human Societies, LJ 2/15/97), poses credible and thought-provoking yet entertaining factors: the lengthy period of dependency of human infants, sex for pleasure as the tie that helps bind a mother and a father together, and menopause as an evolutionary advantage that, by ending the childbearing years, allows females to pass wisdom and knowledge on to society and succeeding generations. Recommended for most libraries.?Gloria Maxwell, Kansas City P.L., Kan.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Evolution et gros seins 12 septembre 2010
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Jared Diamond nous informe sur la vision que porte la biologie évolutive sur la sexualité humaine, comme il l'a déjà fait pour l'examen comparatif des civilisations qui s'effondrent et celles qui survivent : avec candeur, sérieux et exhaustivité.
Oui, ce livre joue sur la légèreté apparente des sujets qu'il aborde : la taille du pénis ainsi que celle des seins, la sexualité non reproductive, etc. Mais le fond est toujours extrêmement bien documenté et argumenté. Certains chapitres sont puissamment révélateurs de la nature humaine, d'autres laissent rêveurs sur l'influence de la sexualité sur l'organisation humaine.
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Amazon.com: 3.8 étoiles sur 5  68 commentaires
165 internautes sur 179 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Why Sex is Sex 13 janvier 2003
Par Albert Swanson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
There is a minor truth-in-advertising issue regarding Why Is Sex Fun?: The Evolution of Human Sexuality, by physiologist Jared Diamond: The title question is never really addressed. The true theme seems to be How Sex Came to be Sex as We Know It. Not that this isn't interesting in its own right, of course. It's just that the original question is worthy of discussion too.
Why is Sex Fun? reads like a lecture series rather than a book. Apparently intended to provide the reader with an overview of the latest thinking on the evolutionary aspects of the subject, this short work includes sections on different sexual (and mate) selection strategies employed by males and females (presumably based on unequal "investments" in the methods of getting one's genes into the next generation); lactation (why milk is produced by females, but not, as a rule, males); how and why humans, almost uniquely, came to engage in engage in recreational sex; the unequal domestic roles played by males and females, particularly in child rearing; female menopause (which is, again, nearly unique to humans); and sexual signaling (Diamond considers penis length in human males to be a prime example, but not necessarily a signal directed at females).
As fascinating as these subjects are, there is much more that is left out. Any full discussion of human sexuality, especially with the high-order concept of "fun" in its presumed abstract, needs to deal with that odd species' whole gamut of non-procreational expression: homosexuality, old-age love, and sex-as-power, for non-inclusive example. But Why is Sex Fun? treats the very large subject of recreational sex only from the "selfish gene" point of view. Even then, there is at least one major methodological criticism: Most evolutionary biologists and evolutionary psychologists go to great lengths to bring out the importance of "ancestral environment". That is, gene-based behavioral tendencies have evolved over a great deal of time, so it doesn't do a lot of good to consider them only from the standpoint of a modern participant. This problem crops up in Diamond's discussion of male hunting strategies. In a modern hunter-gatherer society, men typically go for the "big kill" (a large mammal, for instance), while women are more content to gather roots and so on. Diamond makes the point that the male strategy makes no sense nutritionally, so the answer must be found in differential sexual strategies. However, the possibility is not mentioned that hunting patterns may have evolved when big game was, in fact, rather more plentiful than it is today.
All this is a pity, because we know, from the author's other works (especially the wonderfully told Guns, Germs, and Steel), that he is quite capable of a fully formed presentation. Sex deserves it.
89 internautes sur 95 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Stimulating topic 2 juin 1999
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
I really liked that booked, but then I also bought "The Third Chimpanzee" from Jared and I found that "Why sex is fun" to be just an excerpt of the spicy parts of "The Third Chimpanzee".
So, if you want to see the spicy sections only, this is your book, but if you buy "The Third Chimpanzee" you get a fuller picture and all the hot topics as well.
Philipp Schaumann Singapore
31 internautes sur 34 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Just in case you needed explanation 4 février 2005
Par Schtinky - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
Actual content of this short work (only 146 pages) I would rate only 3 1/2 stars, mostly due to the lack of a bibliography, but Diamond makes up for everything with his reader friendly style, earning him 4 stars. He does present extensive additional reading materials and a complete index, so even with a lack of reference he does not leave you in the dark should you decide further study is in order.

`Why Sex Is Fun' is really just an anthropological muse, Diamond giving you the feeling that you are sitting in a café with him, kicking back, drinking some wine, and mulling over an interesting subject with well schooled friend.

He thoroughly examines the separation of man from ape in our breeding signals and patterns, but leaves out significant sociological factors that held the hand of the human boxes as we evolved up and away from lower-brained species, leaving behind many instinctual behaviors in favor of the intellectual.

However, from a strictly anthropological view, this book is interesting, well written, well formatted, and a welcome addition to Diamond's previous `Guns, Germs, and Steel' and `The Third Chimpanzee'.

You will find yourself pondering questions such as, Why do human females hide ovulation? Why do human females shut down fertility (menopause)? What is the benefit of the human female being receptive to $ex even when she is not ovulating? What makes human males `stick around' rather than spread their genes as far and wide as possible? Why don't men lactate? (*shudder*) And the favorite chapter for the ladies, What are men good for? Which studies the evolutionary role of the human male.

`Why Is Sex Fun?' is an informative read with a dash of fun, challenging enough for anthropology students and yet written for laymen to enjoy also. Have fun!
161 internautes sur 202 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A supreme exercise in political correctness! 3 décembre 2000
Par Stephen A. Haines - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
Giving stars to rate this book is misleading. The book deserves five for style, but no more than three for content. Diamond is a convincing writer with an excellent prose style. He delves fully into his topics, presenting them lucidly, demonstrating an ability to think deeply before presenting his ideas to the reader. His GUNS, GERMS AND STEEL deserved every accolade it received. THE THIRD CHIMPANZEE was a fine example of innovative thinking, presented with clarity. He deserves full marks for challenging readers to consider their opinions and reflect on options previously unconsidered. You don't need to be a scientist to read him, you only need an open mind.
Diamond's theme is that human sexuality is not just different from that of the other animals, but almost drastically so. Reproductive strategies range from 'r' [sow 'em and forget 'em] through 'K' [no sacrifice is too great] with humans almost the ultimate K practitioners. Evolutionary pressures on a creature that wasn't a good predator but fine prey led us down a path resulting in a massive investment in raising offspring.
What are the implications of our version of sexual techniques? Human beings have evolved in a way that natural sexual signals have been buried out of sight. It's called concealed ovulation and methods of pinpointing when a woman was likely to conceive weren't developed until this century. Fish, birds, and other mammals [particularly baboons] exhibit colours, engage in ceremonial displays or have other visible indications that the time is right! But humans keep it a big secret. Is there a valid reason?
And when a sexual coupling has generated a foetus, we put more time, energy and resources to its birthing and upbringing than nearly any other animal. Almost from the instant of conception the foetus and the mother are at war over resource allocation. Mum and babe each want the calcium, iron and other factors required by the one for survival and the other for growth. All this is pretty draining on Mum, who still has a life to lead while carrying that powerful parasite in her womb.
And where's Hubby during all this? That is a major part of Diamond's account of human sex relations. Males invest minimal resources in producing offspring and in most mammal species, decamp after coupling. Human males, however, form part of the renowned 'nuclear family'. In the chapter "What Are Men Good For?" Diamond shows how and why human males are bonded to mates in a way few other species exhibit. One major aspect of this bond, of course, is the nearly constant availability of a sexual partner [NOT 'object']. From that derives that since human women can conceal their ovulation so well, he'd better stick around to ensure any other offspring are indeed his. Since she is receptive all the time and can conceive at some indeterminate time, he'd better be there at the right time. That this situation doesn't always keep males in line is exemplified by the study showing that up to 20 per cent of British babies were conceived by someone other than the purportive parent.
Diamond goes to some effort to make human males more captive to their familial role than they might wish. As stated, the minimal expenditure of some sperm to occupy a mate for a year or so isn't always enough to foster a strong sense of responsibility in men. However, Diamond's proposed solution is one of the most astonishing ideas submitted by anyone yet. He suggests that hormonal treatments for men, inducing lactation and giving men the chance to learn the meaning of nurturing. How much more 'politically correct' can one be? One hopes this chapter was written because of Marie adopting a Lysistratian role, witholding favours until Diamond acceded to her demand for its inclusion. That, or some life- threatening gesture are the only acceptable reasons for a man of Diamond's qualifications trying to reverse the whole course of evolution and make humans even more unique among the animals than they already are. There are enough feminists out there trying to reverse the status evolution has given us. Diamond's suggestion nearly invalidates an otherwise captivating and informative book.
28 internautes sur 33 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Entertaining, yes, but also important 30 octobre 1998
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I admit also being tempted to talk about the book's entertainment value, of the author's light and witty style and his interesting anecdotes. However, the title and style belie the critically important nature of the subject: the origin of human sexual behavior, which is such a major part of human behavior in general, both good and bad.
The rather sour reviewer below makes a good point that the book contains material familiar to those of us already acquainted with the subject, but that in no way detracts from its value. In my experience, most people, even those otherwise sophisticated and well-educated, do not sufficiently appreciate the importance of evolution. Though they may understand it intellectually, they fail to see evolutionary forces playing a fundamental role in human behavior, and therefore constantly misdiagnose problems and prescribe inappropriate solutions. Their number includes Christians, feminists, and those dealing with racial issues on both sides of the political spectrum--a fairly large chunk of society. Personally, I am here at Amazon to send copies to three friends, all educated at top universities, one a professor of chemistry in one of India's most elite universities. I expect that they will get something out of it, although the (feminist) professor may not take it quite the way I want....
OK, one comment on the book's fun nature: It is fascinating to read anecdotes from Diamond's studies of primates and hunter-gatherer societies, same as it was reading anecdotes about ants and termites in the books by Edward O. Wilson. I'd like to take Wilson and Diamond to lunch someday, and just sit back and listen.
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