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Will Grayson, Will Grayson
 
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Will Grayson, Will Grayson [Format Kindle]

John Green , David Levithan
4.2 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)

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chapter one

When I was little, my dad used to tell me, "Will, you can pick your friends, and you can pick your nose, but you can't pick your friend's nose." This seemed like a reasonably astute observation to me when I was eight, but it turns out to be incorrect on a few levels. To begin with, you cannot possibly pick your friends, or else I never would have ended up with Tiny Cooper.

Tiny Cooper is not the world's gayest person, and he is not the world's largest person, but I believe he may be the world's largest person who is really, really gay, and also the world's gayest person who is really, really large. Tiny has been my best friend since fifth grade, except for all last semester, when he was busy discovering the sheer scope of his own gayness, and I was busy having an actual honest-to-God Group of Friends for the first time in my life, who ended up Never Talking to Me Again due to two slight transgressions:


1. After some school-board member got all upset about gays in the locker room, I defended Tiny Cooper's right to be both gigantic (and, therefore, the best member of our shitty football team's offensive line) and gay in a letter to the school newspaper that I, stupidly, signed.

2. This guy in the Group of Friends named Clint was talking about the letter at lunch, and in the process of talking about it, he called me a bitchsquealer, and I didn't know what a bitchsquealer was, so I was like, "What do you mean?" And then he called me a bitchsquealer again, at which point I told Clint to fuck off and then took my tray and left.

Which I guess means that technically I left the Group of Friends, although it felt the other way around. Honestly, none of them ever seemed to like me, but they were around, which isn't nothing. And now they aren't around, leaving me utterly bereft of social peers.

Unless you count Tiny, that is. Which I suppose I must.

Andbutso a few weeks after we get back from Christmas break our junior year, I'm sitting in my Assigned Seat in precalc when Tiny waltzes in wearing his jersey tucked into his chinos, even though football season is long over. Every day, Tiny miraculously manages to wedge himself into the chair-desk beside mine in precalc, and every day, I am amazed he can do it.

So Tiny squeezes into his chair, I am duly amazed, and then he turns to me and he whispers really loudly because secretly he wants other people to hear, "I'm in love." I roll my eyes, because he falls in love every hour on the hour with some poor new boy. They all look the same: skinny and sweaty and tan, the last an abomination, because all February tans in Chicago are fake, and boys who fake tan—I don't care whether they're gay—are ridiculous.

"You're so cynical," Tiny says, waving his hand at me.

"I'm not cynical, Tiny," I answer. "I'm practical."

"You're a robot," he says. Tiny thinks that I am incapable of what humans call emotion because I have not cried since my seventh birthday, when I saw the movie All Dogs Go to Heaven. I suppose I should have known from the title that it wouldn't end merrily, but in my defense, I was seven. Anyway, I haven't cried since then. I don't really understand the point of crying. Also, I feel that crying is almost—like, aside from deaths of relatives or whatever—totally avoidable if you follow two very simple rules: 1. Don't care too much. 2. Shut up. Everything unfortunate that has ever happened to me has stemmed from failure to follow one of the rules.

"I know love is real because I feel it," Tiny says.

Apparently, class has started without our knowing, because Mr. Applebaum, who is ostensibly teaching us precalculus but is mostly teaching me that pain and suffering must be endured stoically, says, "You feel what, Tiny?"

"Love!" says Tiny. "I feel love." And everyone turns around and either laughs or groans at Tiny, and because I'm sitting next to him and he's my best and only friend, they're laughing and groaning at me, too, which is precisely why I would not choose Tiny Cooper as my friend. He draws too much attention. Also, he has a pathological inability to follow either of my two rules. And so he waltzes around, caring too much and ceaselessly talking, and then he's baffled when the world craps on him. And, of course, due to sheer proximity, this means the world craps on me, too.

After class, I'm staring into my locker, wondering how I managed to leave The Scarlet Letter at home, when Tiny comes up with his Gay-Straight Alliance friends Gary (who is gay) and Jane (who may or may not be—I've never asked), and Tiny says to me, "Apparently, everyone thinks I professed my love for you in precalc. Me in love with Will Grayson. Isn't that the silliest crap you ever heard?"

"Great," I say.

"People are just such idiots," Tiny says. "As if there's something wrong with being in love."

Gary groans then. If you could pick your friends, I'd consider Gary. Tiny got close with Gary and Jane and Gary's boyfriend, Nick, when he joined the GSA during my tenure as a member of the Group of Friends. I barely know Gary, since I've only been hanging around Tiny again for about two weeks, but he seems like the normalest person Tiny has ever befriended.

"There's a difference," Gary points out, "between being in love and announcing it in precalc." Tiny starts to talk and Gary cuts him off. "I mean, don't get me wrong. You have every right to love Zach."

"Billy," says Tiny.

"Wait, what happened to Zach?" I ask, because I could have sworn Tiny was in love with a Zach during precalc. But forty-seven minutes have passed since his proclamation, so maybe he's changed gears. Tiny has had about 3,900 boyfriends—half of them Internet-only.

Gary, who seems as flummoxed by the emergence of Billy as I am, leans against the lockers and bangs his head softly against the steel. "Tiny, you being a makeout whore is so not good for the cause."

I look way up at Tiny and say, "Can we quell the rumors of our love? It hurts my chances with the ladies."

"Calling them ‘the ladies' doesn't help either," Jane tells me.

Tiny laughs. "But seriously," I tell him, "I always catch shit about it." Tiny looks at me seriously for once and nods a little.

"Although for the record," Gary says, "you could do worse than Will Grayson."

"And he has," I note.

Tiny spins in a balletic pirouette out into the middle of the hallway and, laughing, shouts, "Dear World, I am not hot for Will Grayson. But world, there's something else you should know about Will Grayson." And then he begins to sing, a Broadway baritone as big as his waist, "I can't live without him!"

People laugh and whoop and clap as Tiny continues the serenade while I walk off to English. It's a long walk, and it only gets longer when someone stops you and asks how it feels to be sodomized by Tiny Cooper, and how you find Tiny Cooper's "gay little pencil prick" behind his fat belly. I respond the way I always do: by looking down and walking straight and fast. I know they're kidding. I know part of knowing someone is being mean to them or whatever. Tiny always has some brilliant thing to say back, like, "For someone who theoretically doesn't want me, you sure spend a lot of time thinking and talking about my penis." Maybe that works for Tiny, but it never works for me. Shutting up works. Following the rules works. So I shut up, and I don't care, and I keep walking, and soon it's over.

The last time I said anything of note was the time I wrote the fricking letter to the editor about fricking Tiny Cooper and his fricking right to be a fricking star on our horrible football team. I don't regret writing the letter in the least, but I regret signing it. Signing it was a clear violation of the rule about shutting up, and look where it got me: alone on a Tuesday afternoon, staring at my black Chuck Taylors.


That night, not long after I order pizza for me and my parents, who are—as always—late at the hospital, Tiny Cooper calls me and, real quiet and fast, he blurts out, "Neutral Milk Hotel is supposedly playing a reunion show at the Hideout and it's totally not advertised and no one even knows about it and holy shit, Grayson, holy shit!"

"Holy shit!" I shout. One thing you can say for Tiny: whenever something awesome happens, Tiny is always the first to hear.

Now, I am not generally given over to excitement, but Neutral Milk Hotel sort of changed my life. They released this absolutely fantastic album called In the Aeroplane Over the Sea in 1998 and haven't been heard from since, purportedly because their lead singer lives in a cave in New Zealand. But anyway, he's a genius. "When?"

"Dunno. I just heard. I'm gonna call Jane, too. She likes them almost as much as you do. Okay, so now. Now. Let's go to the Hideout now."

"I'm literally on my way," I answer, opening the door to the garage.


I call my mom from the car. I tell her Neutral Milk Hotel is playing at the Hideout and she says, "Who? What? You're hiding out?" And then I hum a few bars of one of their songs and Mom says, "Oh, I know that song. It's on the mix you made me," and I say, "Right," and she says, "Well you have to be back by eleven," and I say, "Mom this is a historical event. History doesn't have a curfew," and she says, "Back by ...

Revue de presse

Funny, rude and original (New York Times)

A terrific high-energy tale (Booklist)

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Commentaires client les plus utiles
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Drôle, émouvant et sacrément bien écrit 10 mai 2011
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
C'est une plongée généreuse, à 4 mains et à 2 voix, dans le monde des ados américains d'aujourd'hui: dépressifs, homos/hétéros, obèses, timorés, formidables. Une écriture virtuose et inventive - beaucoup de trouvailles qu'on a envie de garder comme des pépites - une structure originale. Ça interroge le thème de l'identité à-travers le prisme la mécanique quantique et du chat de Schrödinger. Bon, lisez-le, quoi!
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Courtesy of Teens Read Too 27 août 2011
Par TeensReadToo TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS
Format:Broché
Two of today's most popular young adult authors have collaborated together on an entertaining journey into the lives of two characters, both named Will Grayson.

Told in alternating chapters and voices, each Will Grayson is introduced to the reader. Each Will slowly reveals the inner workings of their minds. John Green's Will Grayson has bounced from his friend, Tiny Cooper, to a sporty group of friends, back to Tiny Cooper.

Tiny is anything but Tiny. He's a hulking gay football player of a boy. Tiny is proud to be gay and is pushing to have the school let him put on his production Tiny Dancer: The Tiny Cooper Story. Tiny always puts Will in crazy or uncomfortable situations. Tiny is trying to set Will up with their friend, Jane. Will is attracted to Jane but can't bring himself to pursue her.

On the other side of the city is David Levithan's Will Grayson. This Will is a loner. His only friend is an Internet buddy, Isaac, who lives in Ohio. There's Maura, a girl from school who thinks she's Will's friend, but Will finds her intrusive and bothersome. Maura is convinced Will is gay, but Will refuses to divulge anything personal to her.

As the story develops, both Wills unexpectedly find themselves in the same bizarre porn shop in Chicago. Neither expected to be there, and when they realize they have the same name, they find themselves sitting outside trying to figure things out. Enter Tiny and Jane, and the night is about to get even more bizarre.

Each author has a distinctive style, and it's quite easy to distinguish between the two while reading WILL GRAYSON, WILL GRAYSON. I found one of the author's Will Grayson characters much more appealing than the other, but both are well-written and have fascinating stories to share.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Drôle et engagé 25 juin 2014
Format:Broché
On retrouve le style propre à John Green.
Si vous avez aimé ses autres bouquins, vous aimerez celui-là!

L'histoire de plusieurs étudiants, de leurs soucis de jeunesses, et des problèmes de la société dans laquelle ils vivent.
Tous ça avec humour. On s'attache aux personnages, à leurs défauts et à leurs faiblesses.

A lire d'une traite!
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0 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Bof! 17 février 2013
Par dumas
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
J'ai lu environ cinquante pages de ce roman. Et je n'ai pas pu aller plus loin. Quel ennui!!!Peut-être cela tient-il au style??
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Amazon.com: 4.3 étoiles sur 5  478 commentaires
76 internautes sur 79 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Powerhouse of Awesome 12 avril 2010
Par amandapsychedelia - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I've been waiting for this book to come out since it was announced. Some background on my reading history: I love all of John Green's books and I love what I've read of David Levithan. So, naturally, I had high hopes for this awesome collision of genius.

Will Grayson, Will Grayson is the story of two guys named Will Grayson: they are not related, they have close to nothing in common, and neither, in fact, knows that the other one exists. That is, until their volatile meeting in the middle of this book. In a porn store. In life-crumbling circumstances.

As usual with these two authors, the characters are realistically crafted and easy to relate to. There were times throughout the story that I felt myself nodding in sympathy or feeling vindictive hatred for the unfortunately dead-on portrayal of selfishness and angst that's common in most high school teenagers. What I love about these characters is that they are decidedly fluid individuals who learn life lessons and cry and hope and dissect situations to ridiculous extremes and hold grudges and appreciate love and friendship. This is the kind of book that reminds you what a coming of age tale is supposed to be.

My favorite character was Tiny Cooper. If I had to choose my favorite Will Grayson, I would choose Tiny Cooper. He was just that awesome. Tiny is the very large, very gay, and very fabulous best friend of John Green's Will Grayson. He has received funding from the student council in order to put on a musical he wrote himself called Tiny Dancer--which is, of course, all about Tiny Cooper. He is the show stealer of the book.

On the opposite end of the character spectrum, I never felt much of a connection with Jane, the love interest of John Green's Will Grayson. This is probably because I've come to expect much of John Green's girls. I was infatuated with Alaska Young and Margo was a fantastic multi-dimensional character. I had the same sort of problem with Jane as I did with the heroine of An Abundance of Katherines--I just never fell in love with her.

As for Levithan, I'm still pondering why he chose to write his portion using no capitals. I like to think that it's because his Will Grayson is just too apathetic to care about using a shift key. Authors trying to be innovative with the stylizing their narrative is usually a hit or miss for me. In Levithan's case, the innovation wasn't so over the top that it became pretentious, which--and I'm not naming any names--tends to happen.

For what's it worth, I have absolutely no regrets for paying the twenty dollar price for this book. John Green and David Levithan are a witty powerhouse of a team and I hope that they decide to do more work together in the future. I recommend Will Grayson, Will Grayson to all fans of humorous, romantic, intelligent coming of age tales.
43 internautes sur 46 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Fabulous, But Not Consistent 12 avril 2010
Par Pat Shand - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I'm usually not one for sweeping statements (at least when Joss Whedon isn't the subject of conversation), but here's where I have to give in to the sweepiness: John Green is the best YA writer there is.

Now that that's out of the way, let's get into the book. "Will Grayson, Will Grayson" is a book about two teenagers named Will Grayson. John Green wrote the odd numbered chapters, which feature Will Grayson #1, a guy who keeps to himself in order to keep from getting hurt. He's surrounded by a supporting cast of characters who simply radiate awesome; most of all, Tiny Cooper. David Levithan wrote the even numbered chapters, which feature the depressed and lower-case using Will Grayson #2.

So let me just stress again how fantastic John Green is, so the following sentence has the appropriate amount of weight. After reading Levithan's first chapter, I almost gave up on the book. Yes, that's after reading Green's first wonderful chapter. Yes, that's with the knowledge that I had nine more chapters of Greenery to come. But Levithan's first (and second) chapters are literally the most sterotypical emo stuff I've ever read, to the point where it almost reads like parody. Basically, your essential "I hate my life to the point where I'm mean to my awesome mother AND ALSO I AM SO DEPRESSED THAT I NEVER EAT CEREAL" bull. Every cliche "emo kid" idea you could come up with is thrown in there. It was very grating to read those chapters, hence the almost-giving-up.

But then.

I kept reading, mostly because I trust John Green as a writer and reader. On Levithan's third chapter, there is a clear shift. His Will Grayson suddenly has depth. He's suddenly witty. Suddenly readable. Suddenly nice to his mom. Suddenly, although he is still depressed, Levithan's take on depression becomes well written, instead of the annoying cliched take in his first two chapters. At the sake of narrative consistency, Levithan changed his character and thus made the book readable.

And from that point on, the book is excellent. John Green is insightful, funny, and pretty much what his fans have come to expect from his writing. Levithan, after the horrid beginning, is very readable and has touches of excellence. Overall, the book, the characters, and the reading experience was, as Tiny Cooper would say, fabulous.

8/10
28 internautes sur 33 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Once more, with feeling! 6 avril 2010
Par The Compulsive Reader - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Will Grayson has been Tiny Cooper's best friend since elementary school. Tiny is, according to Will, "the world's largest person who is really, really gay" and constantly falling in and out of love--and dragging Will with him everywhere. When his latest attempt to hook Will up with a girl fails, Will meets Will Grayson, another teen who is depressed and discouraged. Both Wills make an effort not to feel too much in life, but are changed after meeting, and continue to change as Tiny puts on his extravagant and fabulous autobiographical musical, "Tiny Dancer", culminating in an unforgettable and powerful night.

John Green and David Levithan have created a very unique, surprising, and downright hilarious novel. The book is told in alternating chapters, and it's very easy to distinguish which point of view each author is writing from. Their characters are so different, but at the same time the book is very cohesive and engaging. Green's Will is a lot like some of his previous characters: funny, self-deprecating, and a bit nerdy and self conscious, but he is a terrific friend and an honest person. Levithan's Will is a bit darker. He is lonely and depressed, and it's evident throughout most of the book that he is hurting and doesn't know how to be himself, or even be happy. Each Will possesses his own authentic voice, and the chapters flow seamless together, playing off each other well with Tiny as a good (albeit a little self-centered) central character.

The plot is complex, and the change in each Will may be gradual as each one sorts out their own myriad of problems and issues, but the journey is funny, rough, and best of all, smart (for example, Schrondinger's cat is used as an extended metaphor throughout much of the book). Will Grayson, Will Grayson is brilliant and intelligent read about love, appreciation, and feeling with an unflinching and bold style that many teens will appreciate.

Cover Comments: I really like this cover! It is very fitting that since there is a musical in the book there is a spotlight on the cover, and the perspective is different. The font is also pretty cool--I like how some of the letters of the title run into each other. This is just a really excellent cover!
42 internautes sur 52 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Not a favorite for me 19 mai 2011
Par teacher mom - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Before reading WG/WG, I had never read anything by John Green or David Levithan. A few friends of mine are fans of John Green's, so I decided to give this a try. I enjoyed Green's odd chapters much more than Levithan's even chapters.

PROS: The concept is intriguing. I was hooked from reading the back cover. I worried that two authors collaborating in such a way (alternating chapters and essentially creating separate books that collide in the middle) was too ambitious, but they pulled it off. It really works. John Green's character Tiny is larger-than-life (literally and figuratively). His Will Grayson is my favorite, because he's a normal kid who struggles with normal issues. He has a love interest, and his feelings are so real; even when he's contradicting himself, you know exactly what he's going through. The ending was good, if a bit cheesy. (OK, so it's a lot cheesy, actually. It's the kind of ending you'd expect during a season finale of "Glee.") Still, it's enjoyable.

CONS: Levithan's WG character is depressing and whiny and just a.w.f.u.l. It's just tedious and repetitive, and it was just too easy to put the book down when I finished an odd chapter. I had to make myself read the first 4 even chapters, but then finally (near the middle), it got interesting. I can see a lot of other readers putting the book down and never reaching the best part, which incidentally happens during the last 4 chapters.

On a side note, I read this book for book club. We chose it based on the item description. We were not aware it was an LGBT title until we started reading it. I wish this was part of the item description. YA covers a wide area, and there are some parents who might not want their younger teens reading this. (The language was pretty intense.) I wish there could be a rating system for YA books similar to movies, so parents can determine if a book is appropriate for their child or not.

Note: The voting buttons are for the review's helpfulness, not whether you agree or disagree with the reviewer's opinion. It's much more valuable to have well-written reviews that are both critical and high-rating than for everyone to rate the book the same.
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Will Grayson, Will Grayson 1 mai 2010
Par Runa - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
I don't know if I can properly express my love for this book. I'm a proud nerdfighter, so I've been looking forward to the day when John Green's new book would be coming out ever since I first heard about its existence. Upon reading it, I was kind of shocked. Sure, John Green's Will Grayson was a really great character...but David Levithan's will grayson, David Levithan, whose only other work I've read was a short story in Geektastic, made me want to jump into the book and give him a massive shower of hugs. And while John Green is responsible for the creation of Tiny Cooper, it's David Levithan's Tiny that really goes places. So anyways, one of the best things about these two authors is their authenticity. It's like they've grown up without having lost their teenage selves, and are fully able to capture those teenage emotions and write them into an emotionally moving story.
Give me another moment to fangirl over will grayson. I know many people have expressed an intense dislike of David's will's inability to use the shift key. But here's the thing: when depression strikes, it honestly feels like your universal shift key is missing, like nothing you can say deserves capitalization, or in a weird way, recognition and ownership. Your proper nouns are not important enough to be capitalized. So I found myself really relating to that lack of capitalization. Simply speaking, David Levithan broke my heart with will grayson, especially after bringing Tiny Cooper into will's story.
John's contribution to the story was okay, but I felt like it was the same John Green formula we've all seen already. Typical teenage guy, with his larger-than-life sidekick that takes him on a wild journey through the big wide wonderful world. The Love Interest, Jane, bored the heck out of me, and overall, though the writing was predictably spectacular, I was just disinterested in Will Grayson and his story.
I did not want this book to end. I felt like it incorporated every possible teenage high school problem that teens, real teens, have at some point had to deal with. I don't think it's possible to finish this book without wanting your own personal Tiny Cooper.
Anyone else desperately wishing for a soundtrack to this, with big, cheesy, over-the-top musical numbers? Youtube musical theater nerdfighters, get on that!

Rating: 5/5
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