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Wonder [Format Kindle]

R J Palacio
4.4 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (10 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit



I know I’m not an ordinary ten-year-old kid. I mean, sure, I do ordinary things. I eat ice cream. I ride my bike. I play ball. I have an XBox. Stuff like that makes me ordinary. I guess. And I feel ordinary. Inside. But I know ordinary kids don’t make other ordinary kids run away screaming in playgrounds. I know ordinary kids don’t get stared at wherever they go.

If I found a magic lamp and I could have one wish, I would wish that I had a normal face that no one ever noticed at all. I would wish that I could walk down the street without people seeing me and then doing that look-away thing. Here’s what I think: the only reason I’m not ordinary is that no one else sees me that way.

But I’m kind of used to how I look by now. I know how to pretend I don’t see the faces people make. We’ve all gotten pretty good at that sort of thing: me, Mom and Dad, Via. Actually, I take that back: Via’s not so good at it. She can get really annoyed when people do something rude. Like, for instance, one time in the playground some older kids made some noises. I don’t even know what the noises were exactly because I didn’t hear them myself, but Via heard and she just started yelling at the kids. That’s the way she is. I’m not that way.

Via doesn’t see me as ordinary. She says she does, but if I were ordinary, she wouldn’t feel like she needs to protect me as much. And Mom and Dad don’t see me as ordinary, either. They see me as extraordinary. I think the only person in the world who realizes how ordinary I am is me.

My name is August, by the way. I won’t describe what I look like. Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.

Why I Didn’t Go to School

Next week I start fifth grade. Since I’ve never been to a real school before, I am pretty much totally and completely petrified. People think I haven’t gone to school because of the way I look, but it’s not that. It’s because of all the surgeries I’ve had. Twenty-seven since I was born. The bigger ones happened before I was even four years old, so I don’t remember those. But I’ve had two or three surgeries every year since then (some big, some small), and because I’m little for my age, and I have some other medical mysteries that doctors never really figured out, I used to get sick a lot. That’s why my parents decided it was better if I didn’t go to school. I’m much stronger now, though. The last surgery I had was eight months ago, and I probably won’t have to have any more for another couple of years.

Mom homeschools me. She used to be a children’s-book illustrator. She draws really great fairies and mermaids. Her boy stuff isn’t so hot, though. She once tried to draw me a Darth Vader, but it ended up looking like some weird mushroom-shaped robot. I haven’t seen her draw anything in a long time. I think she’s too busy taking care of me and Via.

I can’t say I always wanted to go to school because that wouldn’t be exactly true. What I wanted was to go to school, but only if I could be like every other kid going to school. Have lots of friends and hang out after school and stuff like that.

I have a few really good friends now. Christopher is my best friend, followed by Zachary and Alex. We’ve known each other since we were babies. And since they’ve always known me the way I am, they’re used to me. When we were little, we used to have playdates all the time, but then Christopher moved to Bridgeport in Connecticut. That’s more than an hour away from where I live in North River Heights, which is at the top tip of Manhattan. And Zachary and Alex started going to school. It’s funny: even though Christopher’s the one who moved far away, I still see him more than I see Zachary and Alex. They have all these new friends now. If we bump into each other on the street, they’re still nice to me, though. They always say hello.

I have other friends, too, but not as good as Christopher and Zack and Alex were. For instance, Zack and Alex always invited me to their birthday parties when we were little, but Joel and Eamonn and Gabe never did. Emma invited me once, but I haven’t seen her in a long time. And, of course, I always go to Christopher’s birthday. Maybe I’m making too big a deal about birthday parties.

How I Came to Life

I like when Mom tells this story because it makes me laugh so much. It’s not funny in the way a joke is funny, but when Mom tells it, Via and I just start cracking up.

So when I was in my mom’s stomach, no one had any idea I would come out looking the way I look. Mom had had Via four years before, and that had been such a “walk in the park” (Mom’s expression) that there was no reason to run any special tests. About two months before I was born, the doctors realized there was something wrong with my face, but they didn’t think it was going to be bad. They told Mom and Dad I had a cleft palate and some other stuff going on. They called it “small anomalies.”

There were two nurses in the delivery room the night I was born. One was very nice and sweet. The other one, Mom said, did not seem at all nice or sweet. She had very big arms and (here comes the funny part), she kept farting. Like, she’d bring Mom some ice chips, and then fart. She’d check Mom’s blood pressure, and fart. Mom says it was unbelievable because the nurse never even said excuse me! Meanwhile, Mom’s regular doctor wasn’t on duty that night, so Mom got stuck with this cranky kid doctor she and Dad nicknamed Doogie after some old TV show or something (they didn’t actually call him that to his face). But Mom says that even though everyone in the room was kind of grumpy, Dad kept making her laugh all night long.

When I came out of Mom’s stomach, she said the whole room got very quiet. Mom didn’t even get a chance to look at me because the nice nurse immediately rushed me out of the room. Dad was in such a hurry to follow her that he dropped the video camera, which broke into a million pieces. And then Mom got very upset and tried to get out of bed to see where they were going, but the farting nurse put her very big arms on Mom to keep her down in the bed. They were practically fighting, because Mom was hysterical and the farting nurse was yelling at her to stay calm, and then they both started screaming for the doctor. But guess what? He had fainted! Right on the floor! So when the farting nurse saw that he had fainted, she started pushing him with her foot to get him to wake up, yelling at him the whole time: “What kind of doctor are you? What kind of doctor are you? Get up! Get up!” And then all of a sudden she let out the biggest, loudest, smelliest fart in the history of farts. Mom thinks it was actually the fart that finally woke the doctor up. Anyway, when Mom tells this story, she acts out all the parts--including the farting noises--and it is so, so, so, so funny!

Mom says the farting nurse turned out to be a very nice woman. She stayed with Mom the whole time. Didn’t leave her side even after Dad came back and the doctors told them how sick I was. Mom remembers exactly what the nurse whispered in her ear when the doctor told her I probably wouldn’t live through the night: “Everyone born of God overcometh the world.” And the next day, after I had lived through the night, it was that nurse who held Mom’s hand when they brought her to meet me for the first time.

Mom says by then they had told her all about me. She had been preparing herself for the seeing of me. But she says that when she looked down into my tiny mushed-up face for the first time, all she could see was how pretty my eyes were.

Mom is beautiful, by the way. And Dad is handsome. Via is pretty. In case you were wondering.

Revue de presse

"A gem of a story. Moving and heart-warming. This book made me laugh, made me angry, made me cry" (Malorie Blackman)

"Thoughtful but never preachy. A great book" (Sophie Kinsella)

"It makes ordinary things extraordinary . . . Reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird. It has the power to move hearts and change minds" (Guardian)

"A children's book that's making grown men cry" (Observer)

"The breakout publishing sensation . . . Destined to go the way of Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time and then some. Telling the story of August, a schoolboy born with an unspecified facial deformity, it is dark, funny, touching and no Tube carriage will be without a copy this year" (The Times)

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1984 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 322 pages
  • Editeur : RHCP Digital (1 mars 2012)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0370332288
  • ISBN-13: 978-0370332284
  • ASIN: B00755MHXG
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.4 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (10 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°16.546 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Commentaires client les plus utiles
5.0 étoiles sur 5 On ne reste pas indifférent 13 décembre 2014
Par yuya46
Mon avis

August, 10 ans, n'est jamais allé à l'école, sa mère lui apprend tout. Sauf que cette année, il doit rentrer en sixième et ses parents voudraient l'inscrire dans le cursus scolaire normal parce qu'ils n'arrivent plus à suivre le rythme. Mais ils hésitent car leur fils a une déformation faciale au nom compliqué depuis la naissance. Pour sa famille, cet enfant est un cadeau du siècle, pour les autres, c'est un monstre.
Entre pitié, horreur, amitié, tolérance... August va découvrir que le monstre n'est pas celui que l'on croit.

Le roman est divisé en différentes parties dont le narrateur est à chaque fois différent, que ce soit August, Via (sa sœur), Summer ou Jack (ses amis)... Cela rend le récit plus attrayant, nous avons le point de vue des différents personnages de l'histoire, toujours centré autour d'une même personne, et nous savons ainsi ce qu'ils ressentent par rapport au garçon, au regard des autres...
Par contre, il y a une partie qui m'a totalement déplu. C'est celle sur Justin, le copain de Via. Est-ce une erreur dans mon édition ou est-ce normal qu'il n'y ait plus ni guillemets pour les dialogues, ni majuscules ? Cela m'a bien embêté dans ma lecture, c'était très moche. En plus, son point de vue n'est pas vraiment utile à l'histoire.
Et le point de vue des parents me manquent car ils doivent aussi avoir des moments où, même s'ils adorent leur fils, en ont marre.

August est vraiment un petit garçon attachant.
Lire la suite ›
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Auggie 15 septembre 2014
Par Haidji
The story is a description of a disfigured boy who transitioned from a very sheltered loving existence to the cruelty that he experience when released to the world via attending school.
Wonder is divided into eight parts with are told through a different character's perspective.
The first and last parts are told through Auggie's perspective which brings all of the parts together.
The chapters are short and the ending is a little too convenient but It is nice to read a story where the good guy wins, and a loving family makes a difference.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 A Wonder of a Book 14 juillet 2015
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
_Wonder_ is a funny, moving, glorious celebration of courage
and love. The range of voices and thought processes Palacio captures gives
her polyphonic novel an authenticity that draws you in, heart and soul.
I laughed and cried through much of it. I highly recommend this novel to
adults and adolescents alike. It really is a wonder.
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Les ado et la différence 17 novembre 2014
Par Chu
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Très chouette histoire. Montre bien l'évolution des sentiments des ado face à la différence. Intrigue qui tient le lecteur en haleine.
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Wonder by RJ Palacio 6 juillet 2015
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Wonder is an amazing book that covers lots of different subjects and can help some children who are not happy in their own skin
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