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Worlds of Honor (Honor Harrington - anthologies Book 2) (English Edition)
 
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Worlds of Honor (Honor Harrington - anthologies Book 2) (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

David Weber

Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 6,64
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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

In just a few short years, David Weber has shot to the forefront of science fiction! The core of his work is Honor Harrington, the toughest, smartest starship captain in the galaxy. Now Weber invites you to join him and his invitees as they explore Honor's universe.

The Host and His Guests:

David Weber himself is on board, first telling how young Honor Harrington and her treecat Nimitz faced the impossible task of rescuing the victims of an avalanche in a sub-zero blizzard, then revealing a chapter in the history of the telepathic treecats when a young human who bonded with a treecat was a Very Important Person. Specifically, she was a Manticoran crown princess and the heir to the throne of the empire....

Roland Green offers a hard-hitting account of what happened when Manticore and the People's Republic of Haven went eyeball-to-eyeball over a strategically vital planet....

Linda Evans looks at life among the treecats, before Honor.. ..

Jane Lindskold tells how Honor's monarch, Elizabeth III, had to learn the hard way what monarchy is all about....

At the publisher's request, this title is sold without DRM (Digital Rights Management).

A lifetime military history buff, David Weber has carried his interest in history into his fiction.  In the New York Times best selling Honor Harrington series, the spirit of both C.S. Forester's Horatio Hornblower and history's Admiral Nelson are evident.  With over five million copies of his books in print, David Weber is the fastest rising star in the Science Fiction universe.  His Honor Harrington series boasts over 3 million copies in print, and Weber has had over thirteen of his titles on The New York Times Best Seller List.  War of Honor, book 10 in the series appeared on over twelve Best Seller lists, including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and USA TODAY.

While he is best known for his spirited, modern-minded space operas, he has also developed a fantasy series, of which two books have been published:  Oath of Swords and The War God's Own.  David's solo work also includes three novels of the "Dahak" series, and the stand alone novels:  Path of the Fury and The Excalibur Alternative.

Weber's first published novels grew out of his work as a war game designer for the Task Force game Starfire.  With collaborator Steve White, Weber has written four novels set in that universe: Insurrection, Crusade, In Death Ground, and The Shiva Option.

Recent bestsellers in planetary adventures also include the teamwork of John Ringo in the best selling Empire of Man series where the titles March Upcountry, March to the Sea, March to the Stars and We Few have made appearances on The New York Times List.

Weber's proliferation continues with author Eric Flint, where they joined forces in the Best Selling "Ring of Fire" alternate history series, for 1634: The Baltic War, coming in May.

A popular guest at science fiction conventions, Weber makes his home in South Carolina with his wife Sharon, three children and a passel of dogs.

Biographie de l'auteur

David Weber is one of the top science fiction writers of the 1990s whose acclaimed Honor Harrington series has gained him a devoted and dedicated readership. His many other books include the epic fantasies Oath of Swords and The War God's Own (also Baen).

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 623 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 416 pages
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Illimité
  • Editeur : Baen Books; Édition : 1 (4 décembre 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00AP91SG6
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°35.943 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.2 étoiles sur 5  42 commentaires
15 internautes sur 16 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 More treecats and less fighting 28 mai 2000
Par Kevin W. Parker - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
Honor Harrington now appears to be a franchise, something that makes me a little bit uncomfortable; however, my wife bought me this book, and I willingly read it, so that says something, I suppose.
As my title indicates, these stories focus more on the treecats and less on Our Heroine. As a cat lover myself, I had little problem with this, and in fact the stories could pretty much be ordered in quality based on how much the treecats were involved.
I thought the first two stories were the best. "The Stray" involves a brutal crime that a treecat helps to solve - in the early days of human contact when treecats were still very mysterious and not to be trusted. David Weber's "What Price Dreams?" is from a similar era and focuses on the appeal of humans to treecats. Both are emotional, bittersweet stories, rather different from the usual HH fare.
"Queen's Gambit" focuses more on politics and the investigation of an assassination, but a treecat proves helpful nonetheless. This one wasn't quite as strong as the other two and seemed to end somewhat inconclusively, as if it would have been better as the first or middle third of a full novel rather than a story to itself.
The last two I didn't like at all. Despite having Harrington as a major character (the only story of the five to do so), Weber's "The Hard Way Home" has a contrived situation (Harrington dealing with an officious boss first during a military exercise and then while trying to save the victims of a massive avalanche) and too many expository blurbs unaccompanied by progress in the story. And "Deck Load Strike" is simply dreadful: confusing and badly characterized, it reads about as I would imagine an imaginatively annotated description of a militaristic computer or board game would.
My recommendation: buy the book only if you're fond of treecats and even then only read the first three stories.
8 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 All but one ... 11 avril 2000
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I didn't know anything about Weber, or Harrington, or treecats last Friday night when I first picked this up, idly, at a local bookstore. By Saturday night, when I finished the last story, I still didn't know that much about Harrington (or care all that much, based on the glimpse in "The Hard Way Home,") -- but Treecats were a different proposition altogether -- and that's why I thought "Deck Load Strike" shouldn't even have been included in this book. Its only mention of treecats is in a metaphoric phrase more than three-quarters of the way into a story that, unfortunately, is just another tired old war tale in which ultimately only the bad guys survive, and nobody really wins. However ... the other stories make the book well worth the cover price. What I'd really like to see is a fleshing out of the tale by Linda Evans; "Hard Way Home" has a pair of interesting proto-protagonists, and "Queen's Gambit" is a lovely bit of insight into not just 'cat culture, but people culture too -- specifically, the awful pain people can inflict on one another in the name of love. "What Price Dreams" brought tears to my eyes. Now, if only the last whole useless story had been left out, this would be a gem of an introduction into Weber's universe of treecats, chivalric services, and all-too-human royal families. What didn't I like about the last story, besides the lack of treecats? It's gratuitously profane and vulgar, it has very little originality and its style was tired before Ernie Pyle ever saw his first battlefield with the WWII USMC. Green should be ashamed -- and so should Weber, for letting this junk pollute what could have been quite a pleasing read.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 More background of the Honorverse 9 décembre 2005
Par rnorton828 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
Worlds of Honor is a collection of five short stories set in the universe of David Weber's Honor Harrington series. I have enjoyed the HH novels immensely, and I am finding the short story collections are quite good as well. The first story, The Stray, by Linda Evans, is a murder mystery set on Sphinx with a human doctor and a treecat working together to solve the crime. Weber himself checks in with What Price Dreams about the first adoption of a member of the Manticore Royal Family by a treecat, told largely from the 'cat's perspective. Queen's Gambit, by Jane Linskold, is a more politically-driven story about the rise of Queen Elizabeth III to the throne of the Royal Kingdom of Manticore and the investigation into the assassination of Elizabeth's father. Weber delivers again with The Hard Way Home, the only story in which Honor Harrington puts in an appearance. This story gets away from the usual military or political conflicts found in an HH story and gets more into a man versus nature with the Attica Avalanche. This is probably my favorite story of the five. Finally, Roland J. Green checks in with Deck Load Strike about a raid on a distant backwater planet. This is my least favorite story in this volume. If you're looking for a regular entry in the Honor Harrington series, stick with the full-length novels, but altogether, Worlds of Honor is a fascinating read which, like More Than Honor, helps to further deepen the reader's understanding of the Honorverse.
8 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Tasty, Yet Less Filling 4 juin 2001
Par Rodney Meek - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
First off, let me state that the Honor Harrington series is one of the best things to happen to the science fiction field for quite awhile, at least since the quiet death of the cyberpunk movement. Military SF has been moving into vogue lately, and David Weber's work is the best of the lot. He has created a vivid, detailed, and intricate setting that remains internally consistent, which is no mean feat. He has also developed a large number of characters for whom the reader will feel a significant attachment.
However, this short story collection, by various authors and including Mr. Weber, falls somewhat short of the mark, unless you really like "all treecats, all the time". The first story, "The Stray", is adequate but overly long because the same events are related from multiple points of view. Done well, this can be intriguing; here, it is simply annoying when it takes the injured human hero 40 pages to crawl to his aircar, especially as this takes place in a flashback, so we know that he made it.
The last story, "Deck Load Strike", is much shorter but not terribly interesting. The good guys meet the bad guys and a short fight ensues. Yeah, this is the essence of the vast majority of SF, I suppose, but here it seemed to be stripped to its bare bones and the characters simply fail to come to life. Also, the timing of some of the events of the battle sequence are just plain odd. I mean, a century-old fish-factory ship launches aerial troop transports for the raid, yet somehow crosses many kilometers of ocean to arrive at the strike point at the same time? Fast ship.
"What Price Dreams?" offers a nice glimpse of treecat society and a well-thought-out look at how bad guys set up their plots within plots with their high-tech resources. However, the two primary high points can be seen coming from miles away and are utterly predictable, albeit satisfyingly executed.
"Queen's Gambit" provides some backstory for Honor's Manticoran monarch, Elizabeth III. While the conspiracy portions of the story are rather fascinating, the investigation aspect is a bit dull. Some of it seems so casually done that I kept expecting the Mystery Machine to pull up and disgorge Scooby Doo and friends, crying out, "Let's look for clues!" However, the resolution, with its balance of political compromises, is well depicted.
Best of the bunch is "The Hard Way Home", which features Honor herself in a tale set previous to the series premiere. Here, treecats fortunately do not serve as the deus ex machina to save the day. And for a nice change of pace, the conflict is not military or political in nature, but rather humanity against the elements. Weber has a deft touch with characterization and can sketch out even supporting characters with just a few strokes.
If you want to make your Honor Harrington collection complete, go ahead and pick this one up. But certainly, if you've never read any of the books, skip this one and start with "On Basilisk Station"--you'll be far better off.
8 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Manticore Tales 11 février 2001
Par Daniel C. Sobral - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
For those of you new to David Weber, World of Honor has five tales in the universe of the Honor Harrington series (which started with On Basilisk Station). You *do not* need to have read the series to enjoy this book, though! One of the tales mention facts only brought to light in the nineth book of the series, but it is not really any spoiler, in my opinion.
On the other hand, you _might_ want to read More Than Honor first, at least the "A Beautiful Friendship" tale before reading the treecat stories in this book. It gives a better sense of continuity. That, though, is entirely optional too.
Now, for the stories in this book. The first story, The Stray, was described by some as a detective story. I disagree. While the main plot is, indeed, a detective story, most of it actually deals with Scott MacDallan's relationship with his treecat, his adoption, and a desperate fight for survival as Scott gets seriously wounded in the middle of nowhere. As for the adoption, it's not exactly how David Weber describes it in a few respects, but this is a minor detail. Man&Treecat vs Nature, treecat lifestyle, man & treecat relationships, that's what this tale is mostly about.
The second tale, What Price Dreams, tells the story of the adoption of Princess Adrienne of Manticore, the first member of the royal family to get adopted by a treecat, and how Seeker of Dreams, said treecat, helps save Adrienne's life and her relationship with her father. It also kind of shows why members of the royal family can't get a life insurance. :-)
The third tale, Queen's Gambit, shows how Queen Elizabeth III (the monarch at the start of the HH series) came to power, and how the people who plotted to get her there came to deeply regret it. Finally, it shows Her Majesty paying a high price for her throne.
Fourth tale, The Hard Way Home, tells the story of the Attica Avalanche, when one XO Commander Harrington help save some lives. Actually, though, the show belongs to one Susan Hibson, a 12 years old girl.
I'm afraid I haven't read the fifth tale, though, as it's not directly related to any of my favorite themes, nor written by Weber. All of the other stories are worth it, though, even if none would rate an "excellent".
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