Commencez à lire You Are Now Less Dumb sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Désolé, cet article n'est pas disponible en
Image non disponible pour la
couleur :
Image non disponible
 

You Are Now Less Dumb: How to Conquer Mob Mentality, How to Buy Happiness, and All the Other Ways to Ou tsmart Yourself [Format Kindle]

David McRaney

Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 15,09
Prix Kindle : EUR 10,44 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 4,65 (31%)

App de lecture Kindle gratuite Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 10,44  
Relié EUR 22,39  
Broché EUR 15,73  
CD, Livre audio, CD, Version intégrale EUR 37,67  


Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

Praise for YOU ARE NOT SO SMART by David McRaney

"Every chapter is a welcome reminder that you are not so smart — yet you’re never made to feel dumb.  You Are Not So Smart is a dose of psychology research served in tasty anecdotes that will make you better understand both yourself and the rest of us. You’ll find new perspectives on your relationships with people you know, people you don’t, and even brands. It turns out we’re much more irrational than most of us think, so give yourself every advantage you can and read this book."
Alexis Ohanian, Co-Founder of Reddit.com

“You Are Not So Smart is positively one of the smartest books to come by this year — no illusion there.”
Maria Popova of Brain Pickings

“Simply wonderful.  An engaging and useful guide to how our brilliant brains can go badly wrong.”
Richard Wiseman, bestselling author of 59 Seconds and Quirkology

“McRaney’s sweeping overview is like taking a Psych 101 class with a witty professor and zero homework.”
Psychology Today

“You Are Not So Smart [is] the go-to blog for understanding why we all do silly things.”
Lifehacker.com

“You’d think from the title that it might be curmudgeonly; in fact, You Are Not So Smart is quite big-hearted.”
Jason Kottke, Kottke.org

“Want to get smarter quickly? Read this book”
David Eagleman — neuroscientist and author of Incognito: The Secret Lives of the

“A much-needed field guide to the limits of our so-called consciousness. McRaney presents a witty case for just how witless we all are.”
William Poundstone — bestselling author of Are you Smart Enough to Work at Googl

“Fascinating… After reading this book, you’ll never trust your brain again.”
Alex Boese — bestselling author of Elephants on Acid and Electric Sheep

“Deflating to a certain audience that wants to believe in exceptions, You Are Not So Smart is a tonic to the noxious sweetness of overachievement, an acknowledgment of ordinariness that glories in the quirks of being human without forcing them into a triumphant pyramid. That which cannot be overcome is a part as vital to the human experience as that impulse to try even harder to overcome nature. And if that fails, the flip side to a population crediting itself with falsely inflated powers of observation is that no one might notice if you, too, are not so smart.”
The Onion A.V. Club

“In an Idiocracy dominated by cable TV bobbleheads, government propagandists, and corporate spinmeisters, many of us know that mass ignorance is a huge problem. Now, thanks to David McRaney’s mind-blowing book, we can finally see the scientific roots of that problem. Anybody still self-aware enough to wonder why society now worships willful stupidity should read this book.”
David Sirota, syndicated columnist, radio host and author of “Back to Our Future

“[The] fusion of wry prose and enlightening minilessons is what makes this book so special- page after page, readers will be laughing, learning, and looking at themselves in new ways. McRaney is a fine stylist, easily balancing anecdote, analysis, and witty asides… this book is seriously informative.”
Publisher’s Weekly, Starred Review

“A lively look at our myriad self-delusions and how we can beat or exploit them.”
ParadePraise for You are Now Less Dumb

Présentation de l'éditeur

The author of the bestselling You Are Not So Smart shares more discoveries about self-delusion and irrational thinking, and gives readers a fighting chance at outsmarting their not-so-smart brains

David McRaney’s first book, You Are Not So Smart, evolved from his wildly popular blog of the same name. A mix of popular psychology and trivia, McRaney’s insights have struck a chord with thousands, and his blog--and now podcasts and videos--have become an Internet phenomenon.

Like You Are Not So Smart, You Are Now Less Dumb is grounded in the idea that we all believe ourselves to be objective observers of reality--except we’re not. But that’s okay, because our delusions keep us sane. Expanding on this premise, McRaney provides eye-opening analyses of fifteen more ways we fool ourselves every day, including:
  • The Misattribution of Arousal (Environmental factors have a greater affect on our emotional arousal than the person right in front of us)
  • Sunk Cost Fallacy (We will engage in something we don’t enjoy just to make the time or money already invested “worth it”)
  • Deindividuation (Despite our best intentions, we practically disappear when subsumed by a mob mentality)
McRaney also reveals the true price of happiness, why Benjamin Franklin was such a badass, and how to avoid falling for our own lies. This smart and highly entertaining book will be wowing readers for years to come.

Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?


Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5  94 commentaires
70 internautes sur 75 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Seriously interesting psychology - yet very entertaining 30 juillet 2013
Par D. Graves - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
As one who has always been fascinated by psychology, yet not formally educated in it (beyond a few college courses) and not inclined to read dry textbooks on the subject, this book is a treat. It blends the latest research in individual and social psychology with funny anecdotes and insights into why we behave the way we do. Don't be put off by the title if it seems a bit frivolous: this is a serious, thought-provoking book (though quite humorous and entertaining, as well).

This is more or less a continuation of the author's previous book, "You Are Not So Smart", but you need not feel compelled to read the former: you don't really need to know the themes and ideas of the first book to read this one. In essence, the book shows us how knowledge and understanding of our self-delusions can be used to help us become, well, 'less dumb'. Using recent discoveries and research into behavior to help us see that we are not the objective observers of our lives we believe ourselves to be, but, rather, delusional lemmings stuck on autopilot, the author gives us 17 examples of how we fool ourselves in life.

Each example is brilliantly written and fascinating, incorporating science, funny anecdotes and trivia. But don't get the idea that this is just a whimsical 'pop psychology' book; this is a serious study of our irrational unconscious selves, yet presented in a highly entertaining way (much like how Richard Feynman could make quantum physics accessible and understandable to the average person, as Carl Sagan did with cosmology - complicated science explained in an engaging manner).

The author's central theme is that scientific method has saved - and continues to save - mankind from it's delusional dumbness. While you may deny that had you lived a few centuries ago you would have believed geese grew on trees, don't be so sure. In the example of 'Popular Belief', we learn that even today, myths and popular delusions abound: people in Korea - including highly-educated people - "know" that electric fans cause death, invisibly: If you leave a fan on when you leave the house, all of your pets will be dead when you return. But, not to worry, science will eventually save the Koreans from this delusion:

"When you believe in something, you rarely seek out evidence to the contrary to see how it matches up with your assumptions. That's the source of urban legends, folklore, superstitions, and all the rest. Skepticism is not your strong suit. In the background, while you crochet and golf and browse cat videos, people using science are fighting against your stupidity."

Thank God.

You will definitely be enlightened as to the nature of your own existence and the society you inhabit; it's that good of a book. Highly recommended.
22 internautes sur 25 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Entertaining, BUT 24 mai 2014
Par Mary W. Matthews - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
The good: I enjoyed reading this book. McRaney has a light, breezy style.

The bad: the book was so poorly edited that until the acknowledgements, I speculated that it hadn't been edited at all. For example, neither McRaney nor his editors has mastered the elicit/illicit and elusive/illusive distinctions, among other minor errors of syntax. McRaney's explanation of the Scotsman's Fallacy was unfocused, and his explanation of circular reasoning (petitio principii) was confusing.

The main reason I dinged two stars off this book, however, was McRaney's mini-biography of Freud, which was so poorly written that I initially thought it was a joke and kept hunting for the punch line. Now I keep wondering: what ELSE about this book should I find untrustworthy?
18 internautes sur 21 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Don't buy it if you read "You're not so smart" 17 mars 2014
Par Diogo Freire - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
As much as I love McRaney, I was a bit disappointed to see that this is a re-edited version of "You're not so smart". As brilliant and informative as it is, I would rather not have spent the money as I already had the first book.
8 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Dummies for Dummies 16 mars 2014
Par Pandora Spox - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
This promised to be "a course in behavioral psychology taught by a fun, clever professor… and zero homework!" (Eye-roll). It was that, I suppose, but the psychological experiments, reactions, and explanations weren't satisfying to me on the whole. They were interesting and made you think, but either it seemed obvious people would react a certain way, or what they did seemed weird and I was pretty sure I wouldn't react that way.
BUT… the author goes on to point out we rationalize and reinvent and think we're better than we are… so maybe I'm fooling myself that I'd choose more logical behaviors in an experiment or in life. Depressing thought.
He belittles the idea that anything bad that happens to us has an outcome for our greater good, saying all people have the capacity and inclination to make themselves believe that. It diminishes meaningful experiences to think I'm just naively making connections that aren't there. He goes on to say we externalize that theory to suppose some being or force is watching out for us. In the end he says we're resilient, etc., but it seems like backpeddling for the disses. It's not *that* negative, but it didn't leave me feeling enlightened… maybe a little less dumb and at the same time a little more dumb.
Also, I'm guessing the "conquer mob mentality, buy happiness, outsmart yourself" subhead was tacked on by an editor or publisher, because there's really no actionable advice to be found.
40 internautes sur 57 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Not really what the title says, but still interesting 29 septembre 2013
Par Peter Koziar - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
The book spends a lot of time saying how you're deceived, and almost no time saying how to deal with it, how to find the truth. Also, he falls prey to his own biases, especially an anti-religious bent, where plenty of examples instead abound other places (Piltdown man, anyone?). As far as he's concerned, science never gets anything wrong, but religion never gets anything right.

I think the best part of the book was the section on the "Narrative Fallacy," which helped me understand why I've been investing (sometimes unsuccessfully) the way I have been.

The worst part was probably the section on the "No True Scotsman" fallacy, which was very disorganized, and I think he got it completely wrong. The fallacy isn't about people violating the principles of the group and getting chastised (justly) for it, but, rather, someone who acts in a way that isn't considered typical for the group. For instance, "No true NRA member would campaign for bans on rifles" is not this fallacy, but saying "No true NRA member would vote democratic" would be.

The ending of the book was also a little odd. It just kind of stopped. The last chapter didn't tie things up or reach any conclusions, just dealt with another fallacy like all the rest, then it was done.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique