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Aeneid Book VI: A New Verse Translation
Aeneid Book VI: A New Verse Translation
par Seamus Heaney
Edition : Relié
Prix : EUR 21,78

5.0 étoiles sur 5 A different take on the Classic, 6 mai 2016
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : Aeneid Book VI: A New Verse Translation (Relié)
I was a tad worried at first as why should I buy a different translation of just book VI when I can get the whole critter for the same price.

I am more familiar with Homer. However, I have read the Robert Fagles translation of The Aeneid. I was expecting the beginning attempt by Seamus Heaney.

What I get was much more than a different translation as you can see from the introduction. On a personal note this is much more readable. Luckily you can actually read book IV almost as a standalone.

The Bilingual edition is a plus. Unfortunately I opted for Spanish and German in school and bypassed Latin. so other than just for the fun of it the bilingual part is wasted on me at this time. However it makes the book seem more real.

This would have made a grat school project.

No matter if this is your introduction or just an addition to your library it is well worth purchasing and may even turn out to be your favorite read.


The Iliad: A New Translation by Caroline Alexander
The Iliad: A New Translation by Caroline Alexander
par Homer
Edition : Relié
Prix : EUR 37,99

5.0 étoiles sur 5 The ground is dark with blood, 19 janvier 2016
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Iliad: A New Translation by Caroline Alexander (Relié)
With many books, translations are negligible, with two obvious exceptions, one is the Bible, and surprisingly the other is The Iliad. Each translation can give a different insight and feel to the story. Everyone will have a favorite. I have several.

For example:

"Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus’ son Achilles,
Murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many souls,
great fighters’ souls. But made their bodies carrion,
feasts for dogs and birds,
and the will of Zeus was moving towards its end.
Begin, Muse, when the two first broke and clashed,
Agamemnon lord of men and brilliant Achilles."
-Translated by Robert Fagles, 1990

“Sing, O Goddess, the anger of Achilles, son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a heroes did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures for so were the counsels of Zeus fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles first fell out with one another.”
-Translated by Samuel Butler, 1888

“Rage:
Sing, Goddess, Achilles’ rage,
Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks
Incalculable pain pitched countless souls
Of heroes into Hades’ dark,
And let their bodies rot as feasts
For dogs and birds, as Zeus’ will was done.
Begin with the clash between Agamemnon—
The Greek Warlord—and godlike Achilles.”
-Translated by Stanley Lombardo, 1997

“Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus’ anger, doomed and ruinous,
that caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss
and crowded brave souls into the undergloom,
leaving so many dead men—carrion
for dogs and birds; and the will of Zeus was done.
Begin it when the two men first contending
broke with one another—
the Lord Marshal Agamémnon, Atreus’ son, and Prince Akhilleus.”
-Translated by Translated by Robert Fitzgerald, 1963

“Sing, goddess, the anger of Peleus’ son of Achilleus and its devastation, which puts pains thousandfold upon the Achains,
hurled in the multitudes to the house of Hades strong souls of heroes, but gave their bodies to be the delicate feasting of dogs, of all birds, and the will of Zeus was accomplished since that time when first there stood the division of conflict Atrecus’ son the lord of men and brilliant Achilleus.”
–Translated by Richmond Lattimore, 1951

“Sing, goddess, of Peleus’ son Achilles’ anger, ruinous, that caused the Greeks untold ordeals, consigned to Hades countless valiant souls, heroes, and left their bodies prey for dogs or feast for vultures. Zeus’s will was done from when those two first quarreled and split apart, the king, Agamemnon, and matchless Achilles.”
-Translated by Herbert Jordan, 2008

“An angry man-there is my story: the bitter rancor of Achillês, prince of the house of Peleus, which brought a thousand troubles upon the Achaian host. Many a strong soul it sent down to Hadês, and left the heroes themselves a prey to the dogs and carrion birds, while the will of God moved on to fulfillment.”
-Translated and transliterated by W.H.D. Rouse, 1950

“Achilles’ wrath, to Greece the direful spring
Of woes unnumber’d, heavenly goddess, sing!
That wrath which hurl’d to Pluto’s gloomy reign
The souls of mighty chiefs untimely slain;
Whose limbs unburied on the naked shore,
Devouring dogs and hungry vultures tore.
Since great Achilles and Atrides strove,
Such was the sovereign doom,
and such the will of Jove!”
-Translated by Alexander Pope, 1720

“Achilles sing, O Goddess! Peleus’ son;
His wrath pernicious, who ten thousand woes
Caused to Achaia’s host, sent many a soul
Illustrious into Ades premature,
And Heroes gave (so stood the will of Jove)
To dogs and to all ravening fowls a prey,
When fierce dispute had separated once
The noble Chief Achilles from the son
Of Atreus, Agamemnon, King of men.”
-Translated by William Cowper, London 1791

“Achilles’ baneful wrath – resound, O goddess – that impos’d
Infinite sorrow on the Greeks, and the brave souls loos’d
From beasts heroic; sent them far, to that invisible cave*
That no light comforts; and their limbs to dogs and vultures gave:
To all which Jove’s will give effect; from whom the first strife begun
Betwixt Atrides, king of men, and Thetis’ godlike son*”
-Translated by George Chapman, 1616

“The Rage of Achilles—sing it now, goddess, sing through me
the deadly rage that caused the Achaeans such grief
and hurled down to Hades the souls of so many fighters,
leaving their naked flesh to be eaten by dogs
and carrion birds, as the will of Zeus was accomplished.
Begin at the time when bitter words first divided
that king of men, Agamemnon, and godlike Achilles.”
-Translated by Stephen Mitchell

“Sing now, goddess, the wrath of Achilles the scion of Peleus,
ruinous rage which brought the Achaians uncounted afflictions;
many of the powerful souls it sent to the dwelling of Hades,
those of the heroes, and spoil for the dogs it made it their bodies,
plunder for the birds, and the purpose of Zeus was accomplished__”
-Translated by Rodney Merrill

“Sing, goddess, the anger of Achilles, Peleus’ son,
the accused anger which brought the Achaeans countless
agonies and hurled many mighty shades of heroes into Hades,
causing them to become the prey of dogs
and all kinds of birds; and the plan of Zeus was fulfilled.”
-Translated by Anthony Verity
Antony does not attempt to be poetic. The line numbers are close to the original.

“Of Peleus’ son, Achilles, sing, O Muse,
The vengeance, deep and deadly; whence to Greece
Unnumbered ills arose; which many a soul
Of mighty warriors to the viewless shades
Ultimately sent; they on the battle plain
Unburied lay, to rav’ning dogs,
And carrion birds; but had Jove decreed,”
-Translated by Edward Smith-Stanly 1862

“Sing, Goddess of the rage of Achilles, son of Peleus-
that murderous anger witch condemned Achaeans
to countless agonies and threw many warrior souls
deep into Hades, leaving their dead bodies
carrion food for dogs and birds-
all in the fulfillment of the will of Zeus”
- Translated by Professor Ian Johnston, British Columbia 2006

“The rage, sing O goddess, of Achilles, son of Peleus,
The destructive anger that brought ten-thousand pains to the
Achaeans and sent many brave souls of fighting men to the house
of Hades and made their bodies a feast for dogs
and all kinds of birds. For such was the will of Zeus.”
- Translated by Barry B. Powell

“Wrath, goddess, sing of Achilles Pēleus’s son’s calamitous wrath, which hit the Achaians countless ills many the valiant souls it saw off down to Hādēs, souls of heroes, their selves left as carrion for dogs and all birds of prey, and the plan of Zeus was fulfilled from the first moment those two men parted in fury, Atreus’s son, king of men, and the godlike Achilles.”
-Translated by Peter Green

“Sing, goddess, the wrath of Achilles Peleus' son, the ruinous wrath that brought on the Achaians woes innumerable, and hurled down into Hades many strong souls of heroes, and gave their bodies to be a prey to dogs and all winged fowls; and so the counsel of Zeus wrought out its accomplishment from the day when first strife parted Atreides king of men and noble Achilles.”
- Translated by Andrew Lang, M.A., Walter Leaf, Litt.D., And Ernest Myers, M.A.
Books I. - IX. . . . . W. Leaf.
" X. - XVI. . . . . A. Lang.
" XVII. - XXIV. . . . . E. Myers.

Another translation is by Ennis Samuel Rees, Jr. (March 17, 1925 – March 24, 2009)

Greek Latin
——- ——-
Zeus. Jupiter.
Hera. Juno.
(Pallas) Athene. Minerva.
Aphrodite. Venus.
Poseidon. Neptune.
Ares. Mars.
Hephaestus. Vulcan.
--------
Wrath–sing, goddess, of the ruinous wrath of Peleus’ son Achilles,
that inflicted woes without number upon the Achaeans,
hurled fourth two Hades many strong souls of warriors
and rendered their bodies prey for the dogs,
for all birds, and the will of Zeus was accomplished;
sing from when they to first stood in conflict-
Ateus’ son, lord of men, and godlike Achilles.
-Translated by Caroline Alexander

You will find that some translations are easier to read but others are easier to listen to on recordings, lectures, Kindle, and the like. If you do not see information on specific translators, it is still worth the speculation and purchase. Right after the translation readability and understanding, do not overlook the introduction which gives an inset to what you are about to read.

The Stephen Mitchell translation goes though each of the major characters so well that you think you know them before you starts reading. Other introductions explain the struggle between different types of power. Rodney Merrill’s 28 page introduction focuses on singing.

The Peter Green translation is easy to read. It is almost a transliteration. However it is the all the scholarly supplemental information that give worth to his contribution.

The Oxford University Press Barry B. Powell has an extensive introduction with real “MAPS”. Also there is information of the finder Schliemann. We even get annotation on the meaning being conveyed.

The Caroline Alexander Translation is most excellent for a first translation reading. While other translation rely so much on being scholarly, her translation with plenty of white space make you feel that you are partaking in listening in awe. The only thing missing is the background music.

Our story takes place in the ninth year of the ongoing war. We get some introduction to the first nine years but they are just a background to this tale of pride, sorrow and revenge. The story will also end abruptly before the end of the war.

We have the wide conflict between the Trojans and Achaeans over a matter of pride; the gods get to take sides and many times direct spears and shields.

Although the more focused conflict is the power struggle between two different types of power. That of Achilles, son of Peleus and the greatest individual warrior and that of Agamemnon, lord of men, whose power comes form position.

We are treated to a blow by blow inside story as to what each is thinking and an unvarnished description of the perils of war and the search for Arête (to be more like Aries, God of War.)


The Earth Dies Screaming [Import anglais]
The Earth Dies Screaming [Import anglais]
DVD ~ Willard Parker
Prix : EUR 20,51

5.0 étoiles sur 5 Electrifying Terror as the Earth dies screaming, 4 janvier 2016
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Earth Dies Screaming [Import anglais] (DVD)
Yep I counted five good screams in less than an hour.

Like in “The Village of the Damned” everyone falls asleep or possibly dead.
Jeff Nolan (Willard Parker), Peggy (Virginia Field) and a hand full of others survive to face an enemy that will make your eyes bug out.

The plot taken from many B movie themes is a mixture of “Target Earth” (Which also had only one or two robots), tossed in with some of those Walking dead things. The only thing they forgot to do is use flame throwers and threaten little dogs.


The Island of Dr. Moreau
The Island of Dr. Moreau
par H.G. Wells
Edition : Poche
Prix : EUR 4,59

4.0 étoiles sur 5 "I hope, or I could not live", 31 décembre 2015
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Island of Dr. Moreau (Poche)
As with many of H.G.'s stories, it is a tail told by a narrator. Also at first, you may not notice his slipping in of social underpinnings.

Pendrick, our narrator starts out trying to tell how he was disenshipped and disappeared at sea for a year to turn up alive. His explanation is so fantastic that no one believes him. However after we read his account, we do.

He spent the bulk of his time on an isolated island with the mysterious Dr. Moreau, Moreau's right hand man Montgomery, and a menagerie of unique people. Where did they come from and what are they doing on this island? As the story unfolds, Pendrick realizes he is the next either on the operating table or for supper or maybe something more sinister.

This story has shades of William Golding's "Lord of the Flies". However, I can swear that I work with the very same creatures every day. Moreover, I will never look at my cat in the same way.

Somehow, I missed the movie version of this book, so I cannot compare them.


Hamlet (English Edition)
Hamlet (English Edition)
Prix : EUR 0,99

5.0 étoiles sur 5 You will be absorbed into the story, 31 décembre 2015
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : Hamlet (English Edition) (Format Kindle)
Hamlet is Hamlet. If you are buying the revised edition it is for the add-on information.

This really is "The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark" and not only the Prince but also his family. Not only his family but his friends. The tragedy started in the previous generation. Will it end with Hamlet?

Many people are interested in dissecting underlying themes and read more into the characters actions than was probably intended. Many of phrases from Hamlet now challenge Bible for those popular quotes that no one remembers where they came from. The real fun is in just reading the story and as you find that it is not as foreign as you may have thought; you see many characters like these around you today.

A synopsis, Old Hamlet conquered Old Fortinbras seizing Fortinbras' land. Now that Old Hamlet is dead, Young Fortinbras wants his land back and is willing to take it by force. Meanwhile back in Dänemark Prince Hamlet who is excessively grieving the loss of his father, the king, gets an interesting insight from his father's ghost. Looks like Old Hamlet was a victim of a "murder most foul". On top of that they even get married before the funeral meats are cold.

The story is about Hamlet's vacillating as to what to do about his father's murder. However he does surprise many with his persistence and insight.

You will find many great movie presentations and imitations of the story; this is an intriguing read but was really meant to be watched.


American Experience: Sister Aimee [Import USA Zone 1]
American Experience: Sister Aimee [Import USA Zone 1]

5.0 étoiles sur 5 A true American Experience: Sister Aimee, 31 décembre 2015
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : American Experience: Sister Aimee [Import USA Zone 1] (DVD)
This is a well balanced documentary narrated by Blair Brown. Even if you know the whole story you will find something you missed in this presentation. For people that only know the name Aimee Semple McPherson (October 9, 1890 - September 27, 1944), you will get the whole story of the life of Aimee Elizabeth Kennedy, a farm girl from Salford, Ontario, Canada and her extraordinary life's journey.

According to Aimee Miracles are still possible

I was born too late to meet her. However I grew up in the Foursquare Church with neighbors and friends. I never really thought of it as unique but was amazed when I moved from California to Texas and found one here.

Anyway this is part of all our cultural history and needs to be watched. For those interested in Los Angles politics there are interesting insights as to its working.

The presentation shows actual photos and movie dramatizations. We get to see this in a soundbite mode so as Aimee grows up each presented gets to say one line or two at each milestone.

The only drawback is that you can only say so much in this short period of time.


Who Am I This Time [Import USA Zone 1]
Who Am I This Time [Import USA Zone 1]
DVD ~ Susan Sarandon
Proposé par RAREWAVES USA
Prix : EUR 14,53

5.0 étoiles sur 5 Better than the real thing., 30 décembre 2015
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : Who Am I This Time [Import USA Zone 1] (DVD)
What am I saying? This is the real thing. Exceptional acting and well put together. They not only pick the correct main actors Susan Sarandon, and Christopher Walken, but the rest of the cast as well.

Helene Shaw (Susan Sarandon) has always been in love with actors in films. Hardwar store clerk, Harry Nash (Christopher Walken) is a method actor who has played many characters hence the title "Who am I this time? It looks like chemistry is about to take its own course or off course. Or a new course all together.

This film American Playhouse: Season 1, Episode 4 "Who Am I This Time?" is based on a short story by Kurt Vonnegut. I have to admit that I have not read the short story yet. However if this performance is any indication it looks like I missed one.

I watched the DVD that has a few extras:
Author's Bio
Director's Bio
Neal Miller's Bio
Actor Bios
Study guide (requires a computer)
Trailer


The Tao of physics
The Tao of physics
par Fritjof Capra
Edition : Broché

4.0 étoiles sur 5 Parallels are not equivalents., 30 décembre 2015
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Tao of physics (Broché)
There are many solid books on connections and continuity in history and religion and physics. However Jacob Bronowski, "The Ascent of Man", would turn me over in my grave if he found out that I was reading such books as this. There are too many quasi science quasi religion books that want to take some principle and reinterpret it to be a New age truth or prove the some old blind philosopher beat us too it for example (The Seat of the Soul.)

Dr. Capra is drawing parallels in two fields and not trying to say, "See I told you so". He takes the time and pages to describe the science and also does a pretty good job of distilling complex religions down to single chapters. I leave it up to Dr. Capra and you to determine if there really is any parallel. A parallel does not mean equivalents. If you are a Gary Zukav sort of person this book will not help you at all.


The Voyage of the Beagle
The Voyage of the Beagle
par Professor Charles Darwin
Edition : Broché
Prix : EUR 28,02

5.0 étoiles sur 5 You can't tell me he wasn't having fun, 30 décembre 2015
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Voyage of the Beagle (Broché)
Remember this says "Journal" and that is what it is. It is his first parson adventures on and off the Beagle. He even includes stories about the people on the ship, the ship's life, and maintenance. He is always going ashore and venturing beyond the ship charter to go where no Englishman has gone before. He makes friends with tyrants and the down trodden. Once, to get an animal to come to him, he lay on his back and waved his arms and legs in the air. Whatever you do, do not turn your back on him. He is always knocking something on the head and taking it back for study. It is fun trying to match the old names for places with the new.


The Voyage of the Beagle
The Voyage of the Beagle
par Professor Charles Darwin
Edition : Broché
Prix : EUR 23,71

5.0 étoiles sur 5 You can't tell me he wasn't having fun, 30 décembre 2015
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Voyage of the Beagle (Broché)
Remember this says "Journal" and that is what it is. It is his first parson adventures on and off the Beagle. He even includes stories about the people on the ship, the ship's life, and maintenance. He is always going ashore and venturing beyond the ship charter to go where no Englishman has gone before. He makes friends with tyrants and the down trodden. Once, to get an animal to come to him, he lay on his back and waved his arms and legs in the air. Whatever you do, do not turn your back on him. He is always knocking something on the head and taking it back for study. It is fun trying to match the old names for places with the new.


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