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Judy Spotheim "SpJ Judy" (Belgium, Europe)
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1.0 étoiles sur 5 Just a rug scuff, 12 octobre 2014
The photo is nothing like the real scuff.
The scuff is narrow not very long and nothing is impressive with it. Waste of money and time. Beware.


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1 internaute sur 1 a trouvé ce commentaire utile :
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Photo is misleading - object is nothing like you see in the photo, 20 juillet 2013
Beware:
It is not clear from the description that this is a simple piece of cloth, cheaply made, thin, unimpressive and certainly not a poncho or a wrap around shawl.
There is no hint of this being a "tribal dance Ethnique" dress - nothing.
It is just a piece of cloth long enough to masquerade as some sort of a head scarf.
The photo of all of these from This seller "Kabbala store" does misleadingly puts the scarf in an upright position giving the impression that this is a large poncho like object - which it is not.
Avoid and save yourself the money and the disappointment.


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1 internaute sur 1 a trouvé ce commentaire utile :
1.0 étoiles sur 5 This is a simple head-scalf not a poncho or a large onject., 20 juillet 2013
Beware:
It is not clear from the description that this is a simple piece of cloth, cheaply made, thin, unimpressive and certainly not a poncho or a wrap around shawl.
There is no hint of this being a "tribal dance Ethnique" dress - nothing.
It is just a piece of cloth long enough to masquerade as some sort of a head scarf.
The photo of all of these from This seller "Kabbala store" does misleadingly puts the scarf in an upright position giving the impression that this is a large poncho like object - which it is not.
Avoid and save yourself the money and the disappointment.


Aucun titre disponible

2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 BEWARE; This is nothing like the photo shows..., 17 juillet 2013
Achat vérifié(De quoi s'agit-il ?)
It is not clear from the description that this is a simple piece of cloth, cheaply made, thin, unimpressive and certainly not a poncho or a wrap around shawl.
There is no hint of this being a "tribal dance Ethnique" dress - nothing.
It is just a piece of cloth long enough to masquerade as some sort of a head scarf. Avoid it and save yourself the money and the disappointment.


Concerto pour piano, Rhapsody in blue, Seconde Rhapsodie pour piano et orchestre
Concerto pour piano, Rhapsody in blue, Seconde Rhapsodie pour piano et orchestre
Prix : EUR 15,46

5.0 étoiles sur 5 Top rank Gershwin Piano Concerto In F, Rhapsody In Blue, Second Rhapsody, 9 mai 2013
This SACD recording by Bis is another proof their ability to deliver the goods - and how...!
The Bis recording with Freddy Kempe at the piano and Andre Litton conducting the Bergen Philharmonic, stands a formidable competition from another SACD, namely, the RCA Living-Stereo with Earl Wild at the piano and Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops.

The RCA's Rhapsody in Blue, recorded 1959, the Concerto in F & Variations on I got Rhythm, recorded 1961 (the RCA SACD was originally recorded with just few well placed omnidirectional microphones and used tube gear all over). The RCA SACD has only the front channel information while the Bis (2011 recording) has the front and the surround channels information.

And now;
RCA's Earl Wild has found his match with Freddy Kempe on this Bis recording; while Earl Wild has a formidable technical skills and power, the competition winner, Fredy Kempe, has an even more limpid technical skills and overall a greater power of expression and nuances thrown at the listener that (audible) comes all the way through with this Bis modern recording technique. The piano here has some sort of lucidity, decay time captured and an audio expression tone of the "Steinway" piano that the older RCA can not match. Also, the balance between the piano and the orchestra on this Bis recording is quite natural where the piano has sorts of 3-D and is not thrown in your face.

The Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra under Andrew Litton's baton has more 'surprises' for us behind every corner or the score (in a manner of speaking) that makes the listening to the Boston Pops (polished playing) something of a more established 'traditional-viewing' of the score (a feature also prominent with the Previn reading of these works).
With the Bergen Orchestra one discovers passages that were previously 'buried' and now comes to life (the clarinet 'sarcasm' - 'Sexy' sort pronunciation part; Rhapsody in Blue). At certain passages found all over the score of all four Gershwin works recorded here, the Bergen orchestra has more virtuosity, bursts of energy and more topping climaxes captured that eludes the older recording technique from shining thru (actually, the older recording has some congestion on the crescendos that sounds like tape saturation and tape decay; no wonder, since the tapes were transferred to Digital in 2005, some forty-four years after they have been recorded...)

For those listeners who has a capable playback installations that can express and do justice to the virtues of the SACD and to the superb Bis recording technique with its full dynamic and full frequency response - this recording is a must have...
For those who have only front channels SACD playback installations this too, is a great offering.
And for those that has only PCM (normal CD) playback installation - the CD layer on this SACD Bis disk would top any of the PCM (CD) disks available.

Top scores for this Bis SACD - and how...!


Beethoven: Piano Trio, Op. 97 ("Archduke"); Piano Trio, Op. 1, No. 3 (SACD)
Beethoven: Piano Trio, Op. 97 ("Archduke"); Piano Trio, Op. 1, No. 3 (SACD)
Prix : EUR 23,99

5.0 étoiles sur 5 Bis SACD gem of an Archduke piano trio., 9 mai 2013
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : Beethoven: Piano Trio, Op. 97 ("Archduke"); Piano Trio, Op. 1, No. 3 (SACD) (CD)
The Beethoven Archduke Piano Trio Op.97 and Piano Trio Op.1 No.3 on this SACD-DSD recording from Bis, clears its way right to the top few in an already crowded competition and not only because of its sonic supremacy but also because of its intense, emotional, yet agile reading.

Of the few contenders here, is the Oistrakh/Oborin/Knuevitzky - Listened to the original edition EMI-Columbia Magic-note SAX 2352 Stereo LP, and to the Casals/Horoszowski original edition "Hi-Fi Stereo" LP (Philips 1959).
Sonically, both these elderly recordings shows their age and limitation.
Reading wise, the Casals (live recording) has a certain degree of excitement and nervousness in the playing that found their way into the master tape along-side with somewhat of an uncertain spots here and there - comparable to a wagon that is in-equally pulled...
The Oistrakh/Oborin has a much more smooth sailing and gets a better focused violin and cello tone while the piano is somewhat recessed. Yet, it has that full bodied Oistrakh tone and the capturing mannerism of playing.

Compared to both these giants/veteran recordings, the Bis offers a better "balanced" (bland) approach where non of the three players dominates the scene yet all of the players are pulling ahead limpidly, and at times give-in to a passage of nostalgic or ponderous mood.
Very appropriate.

The recording was made at the Academy of Music, Stockholm in 2003, and is well engineered acoustically and with a correct amount of focus and with the right reverberation and decay time together with a high accuracy of the Steinway piano tone and decay time.
The violin, a rare 'Magini Brescia' 1600 instrument, has a special 'sweetness' to its tone without gray string pull to it. The Cello sounds equally sweet and dynamic (the instrument is of an unknown origin).

Both the SACD-DSD and the two channel stereo layer are sonically exceptional in their focus and in their clear, sweet sound presentation.
Switching to and fro between the two layers reveals that both the stereo and the multichannel layers retain the same amount of focus, ambiance and sound-stage spread where the instruments are not at your-face and are not captured from a far obscure distanced horizon...

One should be able to live very happily with the stereo layer fidelity of this recording if one has no surround playback system; with a surround playback system there is a discreet added hall ambiance well judged by the engineering team without that the surround channels attracts attention and distracts from the musical pleasure presented here on this gem of a SACD.
Highly recommended.


Chostakovitch : Symphonie n° 10
Chostakovitch : Symphonie n° 10
Prix : EUR 18,91

3 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A benchmark status of Shostakovich 10th symphony - culturally, interpretation-wise, and certainly sonically-wise., 9 mai 2013
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : Chostakovitch : Symphonie n° 10 (CD)
`My aim was to convey human feelings and passions in this work,' Shostakovich said of his Tenth Symphony in 1953. Stalin was dead, and after his music had been publicly criticized for being too abstract in 1948, Shostakovich had finally gathered the courage to farther start a new composition. With the Tenth Symphony, Shostakovich has matured into being able psychologically to put his memories of Stalin to rest.

In the late seventies it was Kondrashin and Haitink that led the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra into the venue of recording more intensively and performing the Shostakovitch symphonies - and still, in later years, (2008 to 2010) with advanced recording technology, the RCO presented us with an astonishing reading of Shostakovitch Symphony No. 7 with Jansons, and Symphony No. 15 with Bernard Haiting.

The recording at hand of the symphony No. 10 conducted by Mariss Jansons was made in 2009 and released only now, (four years later) sonically it is a spectacular achievement (refer here in its SACD multichannel playback auditioning on a large playback system in a large listening space).
It has just a bit more "body" to the sound compared with the 2010 recording of the Symphony No. 15 (SACD) conducted by Haitink with the sonic effort that possesses some of the most rare of "ethereal" tone properties ever captured in a recording.
This 10th symphony SACD recording at hand has a bit more transparency and "directness" of sound compared to M. Jansons 2008 (SACD) of the Shostakovich symphony No. 7 (which by itself is an award winning RCO-Live release).
So, sonically viewed, this recording of the symphony No. 10 bridges the gape between the superlative 15th and the 7th, and plucks the best sonic properties from either.

The interpretation enjoys the obvious "permanent status" of conductor Jansons now a long associate with the RCO, and with an added degree of authenticity to the reading that comes with that status.

No doubt that this SACD recording with the RCO-Live rises to a benchmark status of this Shostakovich symphony - culturally, interpretation-wise, and certainly sonically-wise.

(Note: Play time is just over the 53 minuets.
Also note that it is wise to compare various offering from other Amazon affiliates, and also to scan the internet looking for the best deal everywhere: It has been long on my mind that in a way, top sellers might be engaged in a Cartel formation where prices are concerned.
My copy was acquired, sealed-new, for about one third less of the presently lowest asking price on the Amazon pages...)
Remarque sur ce commentaire Remarque sur ce commentaire (1) | Permalien | Remarque la plus récente : Jun 22, 2013 7:13 PM MEST


Berlioz : Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem)
Berlioz : Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem)
Prix : EUR 21,90

1 internaute sur 1 a trouvé ce commentaire utile :
5.0 étoiles sur 5 I wish I could endow this recording with more than five stars., 8 mai 2013
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : Berlioz : Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem) (CD)
Guess what...
I did not started my listening session of this 2-SACD set, colossal oeuvre, with the first movement, the Requiem & Kyrie or with the Dies Irae, but instead went straight to the sixth movement, the Lacrymosa. And why?
I wanted to check first how this recording carries its sonic development (read it "how it swells, inflates"), from pianissimo to FFFF gradually, in a span of about 12 minuets; and taking into account that the SACD multichannel recording was recently made, captured during live performance 25th & 26th June 2012 at the St.Paul cathedral, I thought this test of dynamic richness, dynamic gradation and sound-stage dimensions is a most essential parameter upon which the whole listening session of such a grandeur of an oeuvre would stand or fall.

In the past efforts by EMI (late sixties and early seventies) and by DGG has proven a deep sonic disappointment; the notion back then was that following the letter of the huge score and accurately following the score's forces involved would render it impossible to capture on tape and certainly would have to be greatly compromise when transferred to the LP grooves (it would have to be seriously compressed at loud passages, and would have to have a sever attenuation of the bass dynamics and range...) in other words; it was seen as an almost-impossible prospect.

Well, contrary to previous LSO (sonically failed) digital recordings made in their Barbican hall, this session has taken the LSO and chorus outside of their soft-dead-muffled-sounding-hall and placed them in a totally different atmosphere and a totally different acoustic environment - and by that (and by grace of a keen-ear producer), the revered London ensemble got the sonic result for this oeuvre - a result that one might boldly claim to be one of the most desired, inspired, grandiose, almost as big as the live event, sonically awesome inspiring, a grand test for a big multi-channel playback system abilities in realism.
But not only that:
There is a grand-feeling of streaming along, of surrender to the greatness of this Berlioz music with Davis conducting and with the tempos he takes here that defy yearning for something grander than that.
The "Lacrymosa" has its central tune which is very easy for the mind to repeat and hold. It simply sits well on the audible memory after only one listening to the theme, but than, at the top of it after several repetitions and semi-pauses, and at the sudden apex - there comes the gong clash (sound-stage left-side) and the FFFF of the brass ensemble and the choir, all which will either get your skin into a bump-goose mode or will make you begin to sob or cry; (now be certain to read about people's reaction present at the church where this oeuvre was rehearsed for the first time ever; you will come to grip with your own reaction to this music and to the notion that even today these passages never fails to move, to impress to bring to the fore something which is universally present there in the music, and in particular in the mold of the European anima and in the listener's set-of-the-mind...)

I believe that there is no need now to farther elaborate upon the Dies Irae sonic (the overwhelming chorus of trombones, tubas, trumpets, of tympani - which are potentially a roof raisers...) the Sanctus or the Agnuis Dei sonic - all are at the cutting-edge of what this very special LSO superb SACD multi-channel recording achieves here.
The tenor soloist passages, though quite short, are sung with elan, with an angelic-smooth voice, taking the notes which are all almost at the top end of the tenor-voice-range (should be a "tenorino" voice with the use of "kopf-tone') and producing them with great accuracy, pitch, and delicacy...

The booklet that accompany the 2-SACD does not elaborate on the recording equipment and components used for this 2012 recording, but judging from the results; sweet, in-intrusive, harmonically correct, more analogue-like presentation of the sound than usual - these must be the best of the best gear available to this recording team.

However; one should not overlook the almost sixty years old Munch/Boston recording (available on SACD front channel only), which in his high-days was considered to be a mile-stone of a recording.
In a direct comparison with this LSO SACD multichannel recording the Living Stereo images sounds somewhat closer to the listener, somewhat more defined, somewhat grainier and flat in texture and limited in dynamic and frequency range. (other front-channel only CD recording/non SACD - becomes now irrelevant and obsolete altogether and that includes the Telarc CD).

This SACD multi-channel recording of Colin Davis/LSO should be up-front, high on the list of every Berlioz aficionado.
Equally, it is imperative now for the LSO label to comes to grip with reality and for the sake of superior future recording with the LSO - abandon the Barbican hall as a recording location altogether.
The sonic and artistic achievement present here with this LSO recording (outside its hall) and in an appropriate acoustic environment for the specific work at hand, supports the SACD medium/technique claim to superiority.

I wish I could endow this recording with more than the five stars...!


Berlioz : Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem)
Berlioz : Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem)
Prix : EUR 21,90

2 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 I wish I could endow this recording with more than five stars., 8 mai 2013
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : Berlioz : Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem) (CD)
Guess what...
I did not started my listening session of this 2-SACD set, colossal oeuvre, with the first movement, the Requiem & Kyrie or with the Dies Irae, but instead went straight to the sixth movement, the Lacrymosa. And why?
I wanted to check first how this recording carries its sonic development (read it "how it swells, inflates"), from pianissimo to FFFF gradually, in a span of about 12 minuets; and taking into account that the SACD multichannel recording was recently made, captured during live performance 25th & 26th June 2012 at the St.Paul cathedral, I thought this test of dynamic richness, dynamic gradation and sound-stage dimensions is a most essential parameter upon which the whole listening session of such a grandeur of an oeuvre would stand or fall.

In the past efforts by EMI (late sixties and early seventies) and by DGG has proven a deep sonic disappointment; the notion back then was that following the letter of the huge score and accurately following the score's forces involved would render it impossible to capture on tape and certainly would have to be greatly compromise when transferred to the LP grooves (it would have to be seriously compressed at loud passages, and would have to have a sever attenuation of the bass dynamics and range...) in other words; it was seen as an almost-impossible prospect.

Well, contrary to previous LSO (sonically failed) digital recordings made in their Barbican hall, this session has taken the LSO and chorus outside of their soft-dead-muffled-sounding-hall and placed them in a totally different atmosphere and a totally different acoustic environment - and by that (and by grace of a keen-ear producer), the revered London ensemble got the sonic result for this oeuvre - a result that one might boldly claim to be one of the most desired, inspired, grandiose, almost as big as the live event, sonically awesome inspiring, a grand test for a big multi-channel playback system abilities in realism.
But not only that:
There is a grand-feeling of streaming along, of surrender to the greatness of this Berlioz music with Davis conducting and with the tempos he takes here that defy yearning for something grander than that.
The "Lacrymosa" has its central tune which is very easy for the mind to repeat and hold. It simply sits well on the audible memory after only one listening to the theme, but than, at the top of it after several repetitions and semi-pauses, and at the sudden apex - there comes the gong clash (sound-stage left-side) and the FFFF of the brass ensemble and the choir, all which will either get your skin into a bump-goose mode or will make you begin to sob or cry; (now be certain to read about people's reaction present at the church where this oeuvre was rehearsed for the first time ever; you will come to grip with your own reaction to this music and to the notion that even today these passages never fails to move, to impress to bring to the fore something which is universally present there in the music, and in particular in the mold of the European anima and in the listener's set-of-the-mind...)

I believe that there is no need now to farther elaborate upon the Dies Irae sonic (the overwhelming chorus of trombones, tubas, trumpets, of tympani - which are potentially a roof raisers...) the Sanctus or the Agnuis Dei sonic - all are at the cutting-edge of what this very special LSO superb SACD multi-channel recording achieves here.
The tenor soloist passages, though quite short, are sung with elan, with an angelic-smooth voice, taking the notes which are all almost at the top end of the tenor-voice-range (should be a "tenorino" voice with the use of "kopf-tone') and producing them with great accuracy, pitch, and delicacy...

The booklet that accompany the 2-SACD does not elaborate on the recording equipment and components used for this 2012 recording, but judging from the results; sweet, in-intrusive, harmonically correct, more analogue-like presentation of the sound than usual - these must be the best of the best gear available to this recording team.

However; one should not overlook the almost sixty years old Munch/Boston recording (available on SACD front channel only), which in his high-days was considered to be a mile-stone of a recording.
In a direct comparison with this LSO SACD multichannel recording the Living Stereo images sounds somewhat closer to the listener, somewhat more defined, somewhat grainier and flat in texture and limited in dynamic and frequency range. (other front-channel only CD recording/non SACD - becomes now irrelevant and obsolete altogether and that includes the Telarc CD).

This SACD multi-channel recording of Colin Davis/LSO should be up-front, high on the list of every Berlioz aficionado.
Equally, it is imperative now for the LSO label to comes to grip with reality and for the sake of superior future recording with the LSO - abandon the Barbican hall as a recording location altogether.
The sonic and artistic achievement present here with this LSO recording (outside its hall) and in an appropriate acoustic environment for the specific work at hand, supports the SACD medium/technique claim to superiority.

I wish I could endow this recording with more than the five stars...!


La Cetra, opus 9 (12 Concertos pour violon)
La Cetra, opus 9 (12 Concertos pour violon)
Prix : EUR 25,01

4 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Nice notes but not a great acoustics sound in the round, 28 juin 2012
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : La Cetra, opus 9 (12 Concertos pour violon) (CD)
No doubts that this is a 'curiosa' assemblage of lesser known petite-scale-Vivaldi-concertos with the occasional scattered tiny semi-precious-stones here and there - not even close to Vivaldi 4-seasons glory, and do not expect a four-seasons-for-runner here...
My concern here is more with the audio properties of this 2-SACD set.

During the first few minuets of listening to this SACD recording one is reminded of the sonic properties or finger print if you will, of the now legendary, analogue recording "Music ancient du Greece" made in the seventies by French Harmonia-Mundi (which also features period instruments), or to the "Devil's Trill" - Palladian Ensemble SACD recording by Linn (also with period instruments - and also recorded in a church) - but the similarity in sonic and sonority with this La-Cetra ends right there;
Where the French Harmonia-Mundi recording and the Linn SACD Palladians recording (featuring Tartini and Veracini) has more body, more focus, more presence, more depth and clues about the instruments location in relationship to each other - this Channel-Classics SACD (listened to in multichannel mode) has too much reverberation, haze throughout the sound field and around the instruments which lends it an added vagueness.
And what's more; the engineers went out-board here, with the rear channels emphasized beyond proportion to the front channels;
one has to tame the rear-channel's volume DRASTICALLY (almost attenuating them to zero output) in order to achieve any sensible sound-picture of what's going on on the front channels.

Simply put, the more one listens to this recording the more one become tired of that church acoustics, the reverberation captured and the haze that prevail there.
For such a bonbon-pack-low-key Vivaldi oeuvres this is wrong.
Make no mistake; the recording chain used here is one of the best in the business: Best calibrated microphones (too many of those for that simple revenue), great interconnect cables, best Analogue to Digital converter by Grim Audio, etc... and yet, and yet...
A good small to mid-size hall, furnished, draped and carpeted, would have done more justice to these Vivaldi short 'concert pieces'.

As it stands right now, this is not a very attractive SACD offer and certainly the praises endowed on this item are grossly misleading.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Remarques sur ce commentaire (6) | Permalien | Remarque la plus récente : Sep 4, 2012 3:25 PM MEST


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