undrgrnd Cliquez ici Toys NEWNEEEW nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos FIFA16 cliquez_ici Rentrée scolaire Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo

Commentaires client

39
4,7 sur 5 étoiles
Thinking, Fast and Slow
Format: BrochéModifier
Prix:9,50 €+Livraison gratuite avec Amazon Premium
Votre évaluation :(Effacer)Evaluez cet article


Un problème s'est produit lors du filtrage des commentaires. Veuillez réessayer ultérieurement.

17 sur 17 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 7 avril 2012
Je suis d'accord avec ce que d'autres ont déjà dit à ce sujet. Ce livre deviendra une référence. Il devrait être obligatoire dans toutes les écoles/collèges. Il est important d'être conscient des limitations de notre cerveau intuitif et rapide et des nombreuses manières dont il influence notre cerveau analytique paresseux. Exemple parmi tant d'autres: si on vous demandait de choisir entre deux expériences dont l'une vous a déjà fait souffrir physiquement pendant 60 secondes, l'autre pendant 90 secondes, laquelle choisiriez vous? Lisez et comprenez comment le phénomène de "peak-end" vous fera choisir la solution la plus longue!!! Je confirme que si vous ne deviez lire qu'un seul livre cette année, lisez celui ci.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
12 sur 12 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 20 mai 2012
Ce livre est fantastique... En 5 parties, il commence par reprendre la plupart de ses théories (Choices values and frames et la Prospect Theory) puis vient la partie 5 : et là, Kahneman parle de sa théorie sur le "experiencing self" versus le "remembering self".
Pour cette 5eme partie, Kahneman mérite un autre Nobel.
Offrez-vous ce bonheur !
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
4 sur 4 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
*A full executive summary of this book is available at newbooksinbrief dot com.

The adage ‘you are what you eat’ is no doubt literally true, but when it comes to getting at the heart of what we are it is certainly more accurate to say ‘you are what you think’; for our identity emerges out of the life of the mind, and our decisions and actions (including what we eat) is determined by our thoughts. An exploration of how we think therefore cuts to the core of what we are, and offers a clear path to gaining a better understanding of ourselves and why we behave as we do. In addition, while many of us are fairly happy with how our mind works, few of us would say that we could not afford to improve here at least in some respects; and therefore, an exploration of how we think also promises to point the way towards fruitful self-improvement (which stands to help us both in our personal and professional lives). While thinking about thinking was traditionally a speculative practice (embarked upon by philosophers and economists) it has recently received a more empirical treatment through the disciplines of psychology and neuroscience. It is from the latter angle that the Nobel Prize winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman approaches the subject in his new book 'Thinking, Fast and Slow'.

As the title would suggest, Kahneman breaks down thinking into 2 modes or systems. Slow thinking is the system that we normally think of as thought in the strictest sense. It is deliberate and conscious, and we naturally feel as though we are in control of it (Kahneman refers to it as system 2). System 2 is in play when we actively consider what we want to have for dinner tonight, or when we choose what stocks to buy, or when we perform a mathematical calculation. System 1, by contrast, is automatic and unconscious, and hums along continuously in the background. It constantly surveys the environment, and processes the incoming stimuli with razor speed.

System 1 is informed by natural drives and instincts but is also capable of learning, which it does by way of association (that is, connecting up novel stimuli with known stimuli according to shared characteristics, contiguity in time and place, or causality). The system is designed to give us an impression of our environment as quickly as possible, thus allowing us to respond to it immediately, which is especially important in times of danger. In order to do so, system 1 relies on general rules and guidelines (called heuristics). These heuristics are primarily geared to help us in the moment and are tilted towards protecting us from danger, and in this respect they are mostly very useful. Still, mistakes can be made, and the system was specifically designed to work in the environment in which we evolved, which is quite different from our current one, so this adds to its errors.

Over and above this, the impressions that system 1 forms are also fed up to system 2. Indeed, whenever system 1 senses something out of the ordinary or dangerous, system 2 is automatically mobilized to help out with the situation. And even when system 2 is not mobilized specifically out of danger, it is constantly being fed suggestions by system 1. Now, while the impressions of system 1 are fairly effective in protecting us from moment to moment, they are much less effective in long-term planning; and therefore, they are much more problematic here. Of course, system 2 is capable of overriding the impressions of system 1, and of avoiding the errors. However, as Kahneman points out, system 2 is often completely unaware that it is being influenced (and misled) by system 1; and therefore, is not naturally well-equipped to catch the errors. Much of the book is spent exploring the activities and biases of system 1, in order to make us more aware of how this system works and how it influences (and often misleads) system 2.

This is only half the battle, though, for while system 2 may be naturally poorly equipped to catch the errors of system 1, it is also often poorly equipped to correct these errors. Indeed, Kahneman argues that system 2 is simply not a paragon of rationality (as is often assumed in economics), and could stand to use a good deal of help in this regard. The most glaring deficiency of system 2, according to Kahneman, is that it is naturally very poor with probabilities and statistics. Fortunately, system 2 can be trained to improve here, and this is another major concern of the book.

Kahneman does a very good job of breaking down the workings of the mind, and presenting his findings in a very readable way. My only objection to the book is that the arguments are sometimes drawn out much more than needed, and there is a fair bit of repetition. A full executive summary of the book is available at newbooksinbrief dot com; a podcast discussion of the book will be available shortly thereafter.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
3 sur 3 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
Our decisions are biased. What we consider as a rational choice is in fact heavily influenced by our affects and by the immediate clues given by our environment. Prof. Daniel Kahneman, who has studied humain frailty in judgment for decades, states in no uncertain terms that the rational economic agent of university textbooks simply does not exist. We (more or less) all make the same mistakes in evaluating a situation with no obvious outcomes.
I want to give a high mark to this book because I love its clarity, its humor and its scientific approach to the psychological vagaries of our decision-making processes. The sad truth is that even the most skilled professionals are prone to patently prejudiced choices.
Remember Prof. Kahneman the next time you ask your pratician whether surgery is needed in your case !
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
12 sur 14 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 12 avril 2012
C'est de loin le meilleur livre sur la psychologie que vous pourrez trouver. Et il est fait pour les non psychologues bien sûr.

Très complet et très bien écrit, Kahneman a pris en compte les limitations de notre cerveau dans la construction du livre. Les chapitres sont courts, les exemples très nombreux et participatifs pour nous permettre de nous rendre compte par nous même des biais dont l'auteur parle (et donc mieux les comprendre et les intégrer).

Pour tous ceux qui sont amené à prendre des décisions de manière fréquente dans leur travail, je ne doute pas que ce livre les aidera à comprendre leurs choix et éventuellement à corriger leurs méthodes.

Le tout étant passionant et facile à lire, je ne peux que conseiller très vivement.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
2 sur 2 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 18 février 2013
Un compte-rendu passionant de la recherche en psychologie des 30 dernieres années sur la manière dont nous (notre cerveau) prenons des décisions. Il illustre en particulier le rôle de la pensée intuitive (décisions rapides et non raisonnées consciemment) par rapport à la pensée réfléchie consciemment. Je ne lui donne que 4 étoiles parce qu'il n'est probablement pas si facile a lire pour un novice complet.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
1 sur 1 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 11 septembre 2012
Je n'ai pas encore terminé la lecture. C'est le genre de livre que l'on n'a pas envie de déposer une fois que l'on a commencé à le lire. J'apprends des tas de choses sur le fonctionnement du cerveau. A lire en parallèle avec le livre de Iain McGilchrist "The Master and his Emissary" ([...]) qui est aussi un livre que l'on arrive pas à quitter. Je me sens souvent conscient de faire des choix paresseux pour répondre à des petits problèmes de la vie courante et ce livre est une aide à la réflexion.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
1 sur 1 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 7 juillet 2013
Definitely worth to read once in your life (actually as soon as possible). If you are interested in human behaviors, decision-making process in mind (to know what's going on there), this book is highly recommended.

The thing I liked about the book is that it doesn't just give you the "the procedure" of the human-behaviors, it is not the just what the author observed, but it gives you very deep analytical opinions derived from those observations.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
1 sur 1 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 24 juillet 2014
Vraiment un bon bouquin. Ca change des ouvrages 'business' genre Good2Great et companie ou tout est alonge inutilement pour en faire un livre.
Ici c'est plutot "une publicaiton scientifique par chapitre". A lire plutot 'un par un' qu'a devorer de bout en bout. Il y a beaucoup de matiere a digerer.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
1 sur 1 personnes ont trouvé le commentaire suivant utile
le 19 juillet 2012
A fascinating read: if offers a simple model that explains why believing in basic mathematical "rationality" is irrational. The examples provided are often surprising - until you realize that you really think that way yourself. I found it hard to put down.
0CommentaireCe commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonEnvoi de commentaires en cours...
Merci de votre commentaire.
Malheureusement, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus
     
 
Les clients ayant consulté cet article ont également regardé
Système 1 / Système 2 : Les deux vitesses de la pensée
Système 1 / Système 2 : Les deux vitesses de la pensée de Daniel Kahneman (Broché - 28 septembre 2012)
EUR 25,00

How To Win Friends And Influence People
How To Win Friends And Influence People de Dale Carnegie (Poche - 27 avril 2010)
EUR 8,00

Freakonomics
Freakonomics de Steven D. Levitt (Poche - 1 septembre 2009)
EUR 5,96