undrgrnd Cliquez ici Litte nav-sa-clothing-shoes nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos cliquez_ici nav_WSHT16 Cliquez ici Acheter Fire Cliquez ici cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo soldes montres soldes bijoux

Commentaires client

4,3 sur 5 étoiles19
4,3 sur 5 étoiles
Format: Broché|Modifier
Prix:10,66 €+ Livraison gratuite avec Amazon Premium
Votre évaluation :(Effacer)Evaluez cet article


Un problème s'est produit lors du filtrage des commentaires. Veuillez réessayer ultérieurement.

le 18 octobre 2011
Reading The House of Mirth today, it's easy to overlook the obvious: that it was not written as a "period piece," but as a modern novel. Readers can get so caught up in the early 20th Century details (the Edwardian-era clothing, the carriages, both horseless and horse-drawn, the elaborate social rituals), that they tend to forget that for Wharton and her first readers this story had all the timeliness of, say, Sex and the City, a book which will probably seem just as dated as Wharton's by the 22nd Century, and less well written.

What Wharton set out to do, and did so effectively in the final analysis, was to present a picture of a then "modern woman," one endowed with beauty and intelligence, placed in a privileged yet precarious position, and to show how a tragic combination of character and circumstance could lead her from the promise of a glittering future to her ultimate degradation and destruction.

Lily Bart, the woman at the center of the novel, was modern in the sense that she was a product of both her era and her social class when the novel was published in 1905. Born and raised on the fringes of upper-class New York society before the turn of the last century, yet orphaned young without inherited wealth, she was expected and prepared to be the wife of a wealthy gentleman. Though refined in the moral as well the esthetic sense, she was prized by her society primarily as an ornament. A beautiful ornament, it's true, but so long as she remained unmarried her "mission" in life could never be considered fulfilled, despite her numerous and varied attributes.

Lily is 29 at the novel's start, and in that era dangerously close to becoming an old maid. The longer a woman in such a situation remained unwed, the more exposed she was to unfavorable or even vicious comments from those whom she most needed to ingratiate herself with in order to maintain a place in their charmed circles and to marry well. A woman in Lily's circumstances could ill afford to be considered too independent, or too careless of her reputation, as she belatedly discovered.

When, through a series of costly reversals, brought about either by accident (Wharton's novel is filled with momentous chance encounters), or due to her own proclivity to sabotage the advances of her prosperous suitors, Lily is cast out of "polite society" and ultimately forced to earn a living through manual labor, she discovers how unprepared she is for what she considers the "dingy" side of life. And not mere dinginess and toil, but the prospect of poverty and abject humiliation are what she faces as the novel nears its conclusion.

A sharp descent indeed for someone who started out so near the pinnacle of worldly success, and was so intimately received by those that had already achieved it.

When today's readers encounter Lily and her plight in Wharton's novel, there may be an urge to dismiss this story as unrelated to our modern society, where social rules are not so inflexible, and women (in most cases) are routinely expected to be able to earn their own living. But Wharton was not a reporter, she was a gifted novelist, and her tale of a character trapped in an infernal machine from which she can find no escape still has the power to move us deeply. Beyond the period details, The House of Mirth offers us a believable story in which a character struggles to survive a catastrophe partly of her own making, and partly of others'. Such a tragic tale, so skillfully narrated, is timeless.
22 commentaires|9 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 23 juin 2013
Sous ce titre plutôt abstrait pour les anglicistes de la première heure (traduit en français par "Chez les heureux du monde", mais il se traduirait littéralement par "la maison des rires" (mirth= joie éphémère, rire léger) se cache un magnifique livre qui critique la haute société Américaine du début du XXe siècle. Wharton délivre un portrait précis mais cinglant de cette société autours de son héroïne au destin tragique qui va graduellement descendre les échelons sociaux, jusqu'à devenir une couturière, c'est à dire une femme qui travaille à une époque où cette position sociale est vue comme étant la plus basse possible pour une femme!
L'histoire est poignante, parfois retorse à cause du style "hautain" mais toujours agréable à lire.

Cet e-book vaut vraiment le coup qu'on y jette un oeil!
0Commentaire|2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 15 janvier 2014
J'ai étudié ce roman parce qu'il était au programme de l'agrégation d'anglais 2013-2014 et je ne me lasse pas de le relire. Pour les étudiants comme pour les curieux, cette édition est assortie d'un appareil critique qui permet de mettre la lecture de l’œuvre en perspective et de mieux comprendre l'esprit de l'époque d'Edith Wharton.
0Commentaire|3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 7 juillet 2013
Quel bonheur de lire un anglais aussi éblouissant ! E. Wharton décrit avec tant de finesse les états d'âme des personnages. On ne peut que recommanderla lecture de ce roman.
0Commentaire|Une personne a trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 16 juin 2013
excellent plume d'Edith Wharton, en plus des commentaires de ses contemporains - très precieux. N'a pas vielli d'un cran. Je le recommende vivement.
0Commentaire|Une personne a trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 16 juillet 2013
Wharton dépeint brillamment la haute société hypocrite et matérialiste du Golden Age. On suit le destin tragique de Lily, fleur trop fragile pour ce monde de brutes. C'est un beau réquisitoire contre les lois économiques machistes de l'époque qui soumettait les femmes à des mariages d'argent.
0Commentaire|Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 27 septembre 2014
il manque des pages dans cet édition . on passe des ligne 314 à 331. bienque le delai de 30 jours soit ecoulé, je réclame pouvoir le changer si possible merci ou bien prendre une autre édition, quitte à payer la difference.

merci
0Commentaire|Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 4 février 2014
a 1905 book all relevant today a century laler, did we grow up?
it is enlightening to read such a portrait of US bourgeois society and its pervertions, limitations and violent hypocricy, a sad story, an unexpected fall...
0Commentaire|Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 12 juillet 2014
Article arrivé dans les temps prévus. Livre très intéressant, avec des articles en plus. A recommander même pour le plaisir; mon année d'agrégation promet d'être intéressante!
0Commentaire|Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 30 janvier 2014
A voyage through time, of undying love of tragic fate, of colours and sentiments so vivid that the reader is often under the impression of living in that bygone era.
0Commentaire|Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus

Les client ont également visualisé ces articles

2,82 €