undrgrnd Cliquez ici Livres Fête des Mères nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos cliquez_ici Cliquez ici Acheter Fire Acheter Kindle Paperwhite cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo Fête des Mères

Commentaires client

5,0 sur 5 étoiles4
5,0 sur 5 étoiles
5 étoiles
4
4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoile
0
Format: Broché|Modifier
Prix:16,40 €+ Livraison gratuite avec Amazon Premium

Votre évaluation :(Effacer)Evaluez cet article
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Un problème s'est produit lors du filtrage des commentaires. Veuillez réessayer ultérieurement.

le 15 mars 2004
This book is better than "The Machine That changed the World." For that matter this book is more useful than most in the field, and not just for lean thinking. James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones are unique in the approach this book takes in trying to understand the existing industry and realistic ways to implement lean thinking.
The major thing I found that helped me to read this book is that they are writing this book as some god consultant that tells how he single-handedly corrected a company as their all knowing all and seeing consultant. They took several industries and companies that there is no vested interest in and explain with realistic diagrams, how lean thinking differs from most traditional concepts and procedures.
The only thing I found disturbing was how they make the existing systems seem more complex than they are (The creation of soda cans from bauxite to bottler) and simplified the recycling procedure The point they are making is clear, It is just the way they show the examples that are skewed. It is like trying to sell a microwave egg cooker and telling you that this way the bacon grease will not splatter on your naked body. So who cooks eggs naked? And what if you still want bacon?
They describe that lean thinking is not just, an other form of existing systems, as MRP or JIT. I only wish they did not try to use so many Japanese words when the English ones work just fine.
Ignoring my quirks, this book is up to date and maybe ahead of its time. However while we just talk about other systems, we are implementing this one as we speak.
0Commentaire|3 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 15 mars 2004
This book is better than "The Machine That changed the World." For that matter this book is more useful than most in the field, and not just for lean thinking. James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones are unique in the approach this book takes in trying to understand the existing industry and realistic ways to implement lean thinking.
The major thing I found that helped me to read this book is that they are writing this book as some god consultant that tells how he single-handedly corrected a company as their all knowing all and seeing consultant. They took several industries and companies that there is no vested interest in and explain with realistic diagrams, how lean thinking differs from most traditional concepts and procedures.
The only thing I found disturbing was how they make the existing systems seem more complex than they are (The creation of soda cans from bauxite to bottler) and simplified the recycling procedure the point they are making is clear, it is just the way they show the examples that are skewed. It is like trying to sell a microwave egg cooker and telling you that this way the bacon grease will not splatter on your naked body. So who cooks eggs naked? And what if you still want bacon?
They describe that lean thinking is not just, an other form of existing systems, as MRP or JIT. I only wish they did not try to use so many Japanese words when the English ones work just fine.
Ignoring my quirks, this book is up to date and maybe ahead of its time. However while we just talk about other systems, we are implementing this one as we speak.
0Commentaire|2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 21 avril 2014
Le livre de référence du Lean management : il développe de façon simple et accessible les fameux 5 principes (... de Womack et Jones).
Avec des exemples pertinents, il permettra (à ceux qui n'ont rien compris) de visualiser que le Lean n'est pas une méthode mais un état d'esprit et une remise en question permanente ... A la fin du livre on trouvera tous les éléments et étapes de lancement et de maintien d'une démarche lean
A lire absolument ...
0Commentaire|Une personne a trouvé cela utile. Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus
le 18 décembre 2012
Une référence qui parle d'une méthodologie - voir d'une philosophie - de référence depuis les années 60 et qui a très bien été protégé pendant son transport viaa un carton renforcé adapté
0Commentaire|Ce commentaire vous a-t-il été utile ?OuiNonSignaler un abus

Liens Sponsorisés

  (De quoi s'agit-il?)