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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Rafraichissant...
On m'a recommandé ce livre et en le lisant, en me basant sur le titre seulement, je m'attendais à un récit de la vie après la vie à la sauce hyper new-age, comme c'est un peu la mode pour le moment. Il n'en est rien de tout cela. Le livre a beaucoup de fraîcheur, les détails sont fort travaillés, l'histoire n'est pas aussi...
Publié le 13 octobre 2010 par M. Mathot

versus
1 internaute sur 2 a trouvé ce commentaire utile :
3.0 étoiles sur 5 une idée intéressante
The five People You Meet in Heaven part d'un concept intéressant : que reste-t-il de nos actes -bons ou mauvais- une fois que nous sommes partis.
L'idée de faire parler les 5 personnes dont la vie a été bouleversé par Eddie est séduisante, cependant, au fil des pages, on finit un peu par tourner en rond, le rythme est de plus...
Publié le 20 novembre 2004


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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Rafraichissant..., 13 octobre 2010
Par 
M. Mathot "Angie M." (Liège, Belgique) - Voir tous mes commentaires
(VRAI NOM)   
Achat vérifié(De quoi s'agit-il ?)
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven International Edition (Broché)
On m'a recommandé ce livre et en le lisant, en me basant sur le titre seulement, je m'attendais à un récit de la vie après la vie à la sauce hyper new-age, comme c'est un peu la mode pour le moment. Il n'en est rien de tout cela. Le livre a beaucoup de fraîcheur, les détails sont fort travaillés, l'histoire n'est pas aussi cliché qu'elle pourrait y sembler et le déroulement de l'histoire sait tenir le lecteur en haleine.
L'histoire nous emmène dans le passé de Eddy qui pense avoir vécu une vie d'une banalité abominable. Se voyant comme un minable ayant raté sa vie, son au-delà vient lui prouver le contraire et lui montrer que tout ce qu'il a fait compte et a affecté la vie d'autres personnes.
Une très belle histoire sur les relations que nous avons tous les uns avec les autres, et comment, sans nous en rendre compte, nous nous influençons.
J'ai dévoré le livre en moins de deux jours, il se lit très facilement et est très abordable.
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2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Fabulous, 12 juin 2012
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Broché)
This is one of the most beautiful books about man's pilgrimage through life. The plot is amazing. It is difficult for any one to say what his/her purpose in life is or whether ones' purpose has been achieved when the we die. Still it is good for us to remember the troubles of our life, recollect the memories of things, judge the impact they had on those around us or on humanity as a whole, and determine whether we achieved what we've been trying to find out in life. Life's meaning is unveiled for us to understand in this book. Reminds me of Josef Nana in Disciples of Fortune, which is another positively inspiring book.This is a page-turner to recommend.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 A heavenly tale..., 10 février 2006
Par 
FrKurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (Bloomington, IN USA) - Voir tous mes commentaires
(TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS)   
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Broché)
Heaven is a very personal place. The visions of heaven from various religious traditions tap into hopes (and fears) of people past and present, but ultimately, just as the world is different for each of us, so too must heaven be. Throughout this difference, however, is a question that is perhaps one of the more universal longings in the history of humanity - the quest to find the meaning of life, and the meaning of our lives in particular. It is this longing that Mitch Albom, best known prior to this book for his wonderful writing in `Tuesdays with Morrie'.
The tale begins at the end, not the beginning. Of course, in life, every ending is a beginning of some sort. The end here is the end of Eddie's life - Eddie, a veteran who has gone through times of trouble and tragedy as well as times of joy and optimism, didn't have the life he wanted. Like most people, what Eddie wanted shifted over time, and even when he got what he wanted, it was somehow lacking, or disappointing; on the other hand, there were unexpected things.
Eddie got married, but as with most marriages, it didn't always live up to the dream of the initial love. However, his wife Marguerite remained the love of Eddie's life, and she was one of the five people he met in heaven. This was his closest relationship, but not the only important relationship in his life.
Perhaps drawing on the idea of six degrees of separation, there are people connected to Eddie who are companion guides in heaven that Eddie didn't even realise he was connected to. There is the Blue Man, the side-show freak at the amusement park where Eddie worked; there was the captain from his military days; there was Ruby, for whom Ruby Pier, the amusement park's location, was named; and then there is final person, one that Eddie only knew as a shadow on earth, but who has the biggest impact, and is the one whose hands offer a very touching form of salvation.
Each person has insights and lessons to share with Eddie. Sometimes they reinterpret the events of Eddie's life; sometimes they simply share their sides of the story, that give a fullness to the narrative of life. This is no easy glossing over of reality - none of the characters attempt to explain how, at the heart of it, life really is fair. Indeed, the Blue Man explains in no uncertain terms that life is not fair, stating that if it were, `no good person would ever die young.'
There are issues of redemption and issues of forgiveness here, both of which are not easy to come by, nor always easy to accept. Eddie's life, like most of our lives, needs forgiveness, both in his own sense of life and action, and forgiveness for his own actions. He learns to forgive others as he learns that he himself can be forgiven. It is a powerful realisation.
`The Five People You Meet In Heaven' has a great potential to be melodramatic and cheesy - I must admit that at first, I didn't read the book out of fears of that very thing. It wasn't until I came across a book by another author (Brandon Gilvin, whose work I'd read before, who wrote a small companion to this book (together with Heather Godsey) entitled `Wisdom from The Five People You Meet In Heaven') that I decided the book needed to be read. I am so glad that I did.
Albom draws the story together in an interesting fashion. The scenes in heaven are interwoven with scenes from earth, with analysis from the people and historical narrative and internal dialogue of Eddie's life. There are also pieces that show the life around Eddie, and how sometimes it works and doesn't work. In the end, life goes on for those Eddie left behind; despite the fact that he had no relatives and no monuments or legacies to leave behind (his few remaining friends worried about who was to pay for the funeral), in fact his actions at amusement park served purposes far beyond what Eddie could have dreamed. Despite the feeling that he had lived his life in go-nowhere, do-nothing job, he has in fact fulfilled a great purpose, explained by a little girl - `Children. You keep them safe.' His last act on earth was to save a little girl from an amusement park ride accident, but in fact, he had been doing that all along.
Albom writes in parable form at times, and in sermon form at times, and in storytelling form at times. These weave together in a wonderful combination.
`On earth...when you fell asleep, you sometimes dreamed your heaven and those dreams helped to form it. But there was no reason for such dreams now.'
Eddie's existence goes on, as does the rest of the life of the world, in ways that we do not have the ability to follow. In our dreams, we can envision much; in Albom's writing is the stuff of dreams.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Original!, 26 novembre 2012
Par 
Achat vérifié(De quoi s'agit-il ?)
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Format Kindle)
I enjoyed this original view on what happens next once we are gone! Makes you wonder who you would meet in heaven and made me reflect on the consequences of what I do with my life....
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 A heavenly tale..., 10 février 2006
Par 
FrKurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (Bloomington, IN USA) - Voir tous mes commentaires
(TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS)   
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Broché)
Heaven is a very personal place. The visions of heaven from various religious traditions tap into hopes (and fears) of people past and present, but ultimately, just as the world is different for each of us, so too must heaven be. Throughout this difference, however, is a question that is perhaps one of the more universal longings in the history of humanity - the quest to find the meaning of life, and the meaning of our lives in particular. It is this longing that Mitch Albom, best known prior to this book for his wonderful writing in `Tuesdays with Morrie'.
The tale begins at the end, not the beginning. Of course, in life, every ending is a beginning of some sort. The end here is the end of Eddie's life - Eddie, a veteran who has gone through times of trouble and tragedy as well as times of joy and optimism, didn't have the life he wanted. Like most people, what Eddie wanted shifted over time, and even when he got what he wanted, it was somehow lacking, or disappointing; on the other hand, there were unexpected things.
Eddie got married, but as with most marriages, it didn't always live up to the dream of the initial love. However, his wife Marguerite remained the love of Eddie's life, and she was one of the five people he met in heaven. This was his closest relationship, but not the only important relationship in his life.
Perhaps drawing on the idea of six degrees of separation, there are people connected to Eddie who are companion guides in heaven that Eddie didn't even realise he was connected to. There is the Blue Man, the side-show freak at the amusement park where Eddie worked; there was the captain from his military days; there was Ruby, for whom Ruby Pier, the amusement park's location, was named; and then there is final person, one that Eddie only knew as a shadow on earth, but who has the biggest impact, and is the one whose hands offer a very touching form of salvation.
Each person has insights and lessons to share with Eddie. Sometimes they reinterpret the events of Eddie's life; sometimes they simply share their sides of the story, that give a fullness to the narrative of life. This is no easy glossing over of reality - none of the characters attempt to explain how, at the heart of it, life really is fair. Indeed, the Blue Man explains in no uncertain terms that life is not fair, stating that if it were, `no good person would ever die young.'
There are issues of redemption and issues of forgiveness here, both of which are not easy to come by, nor always easy to accept. Eddie's life, like most of our lives, needs forgiveness, both in his own sense of life and action, and forgiveness for his own actions. He learns to forgive others as he learns that he himself can be forgiven. It is a powerful realisation.
`The Five People You Meet In Heaven' has a great potential to be melodramatic and cheesy - I must admit that at first, I didn't read the book out of fears of that very thing. It wasn't until I came across a book by another author (Brandon Gilvin, whose work I'd read before, who wrote a small companion to this book (together with Heather Godsey) entitled `Wisdom from The Five People You Meet In Heaven') that I decided the book needed to be read. I am so glad that I did.
Albom draws the story together in an interesting fashion. The scenes in heaven are interwoven with scenes from earth, with analysis from the people and historical narrative and internal dialogue of Eddie's life. There are also pieces that show the life around Eddie, and how sometimes it works and doesn't work. In the end, life goes on for those Eddie left behind; despite the fact that he had no relatives and no monuments or legacies to leave behind (his few remaining friends worried about who was to pay for the funeral), in fact his actions at amusement park served purposes far beyond what Eddie could have dreamed. Despite the feeling that he had lived his life in go-nowhere, do-nothing job, he has in fact fulfilled a great purpose, explained by a little girl - `Children. You keep them safe.' His last act on earth was to save a little girl from an amusement park ride accident, but in fact, he had been doing that all along.
Albom writes in parable form at times, and in sermon form at times, and in storytelling form at times. These weave together in a wonderful combination.
`On earth...when you fell asleep, you sometimes dreamed your heaven and those dreams helped to form it. But there was no reason for such dreams now.'
Eddie's existence goes on, as does the rest of the life of the world, in ways that we do not have the ability to follow. In our dreams, we can envision much; in Albom's writing is the stuff of dreams.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 deux livres, 16 mai 2009
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Broché)
fivr people you meet in Heaven et en plus Mardi avec morrie. Les deux livres sont superbe
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3.0 étoiles sur 5 une idée intéressante, 20 novembre 2004
Par Un client
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Broché)
The five People You Meet in Heaven part d'un concept intéressant : que reste-t-il de nos actes -bons ou mauvais- une fois que nous sommes partis.
L'idée de faire parler les 5 personnes dont la vie a été bouleversé par Eddie est séduisante, cependant, au fil des pages, on finit un peu par tourner en rond, le rythme est de plus en plus lent... il manque un petit quelque chose pour en faire un "vrai bon roman". Dommage!
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Aucun internaute (sur 1) n'a trouvé ce commentaire utile :
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Pas très compréhensible, 23 mars 2013
Achat vérifié(De quoi s'agit-il ?)
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Format Kindle)
Je trouve que ce livre n'est pas facile du point de vue style. Il n'est pas évident à comprendre. Le style est très particulier et il faut vraiment lire entre les lignes pour le comprendre.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Buy this book and read it NOW !, 20 juin 2004
Par Un client
Ce commentaire fait référence à cette édition : The Five People You Meet in Heaven (Relié)
I couldn't put it down - a great book - am lloking forward to ththe other books by this author.
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