Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre numéro de téléphone mobile.

Prix Kindle : EUR 8,99

Économisez
EUR 6,20 (41%)

TVA incluse

Ces promotions seront appliquées à cet article :

Certaines promotions sont cumulables avec d'autres offres promotionnelles, d'autres non. Pour en savoir plus, veuillez vous référer aux conditions générales de ces promotions.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works--A True Story par [Harris, Dan]
Publicité sur l'appli Kindle

10% Happier: How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-Help That Actually Works--A True Story Format Kindle

5.0 étoiles sur 5 1 commentaire client

Voir les formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 8,99

Descriptions du produit

Amazon.fr

Dan Harris
Gretchen Rubin
Gretchin Rubin interviews Dan Harris about 10% Happier

I met Dan Harris when a mutual friend suggested that we’d enjoy talking about habits, happiness, and meditation. We had a great discussion, and in fact, Dan was one of several people who inspired me to try meditating. 10% Happier is his hilarious, thought-provoking book about his experiences with meditation. I knew Dan had done a lot of thinking about the relationship of habits and happiness, and how to use habits to foster happiness, so I was eager to hear what he had to say.

Gretchen: What’s a simple habit that consistently makes you happier?

Dan: I never in a million years thought I’d be the type of person who’d say this, but my answer is … meditation.I had always assumed that meditation was for robed gurus, acid-droppers, and people who keep yurts in their backyard. But then I heard about the explosion of scientific research that shows the practice has an almost laughably long list of health benefits, from lowering your blood pressure to boosting your immune system to essentially rewiring your brain for happiness. I started with five minutes a day, and very quickly noticed three benefits: 1. Increased focus, 2. A greater sense of calm, and 3. A vastly improved ability to jolt myself out of rumination and fantasies about the past or the future, and back to whatever was happening right in front of my face.Over time (I’ve now been at it for about four years and do 35 minutes a day), an even more substantial benefit kicked in: I created a different relationship to the voice in my head. You know the voice I’m talking about. It’s what has us reaching into the fridge when we’re not hungry, checking our e-mail while we’re in conversation with other people, and losing our temper only to regret it later. The ability to see what’s going on in your head at any given moment without reacting to it blindly—often called “mindfulness”—is a superpower.I’m certainly not arguing that meditation is a panacea. I still do tons of stupid stuff – as my wife will attest. But the practice has definitely made me happier, calmer, and nicer.

Gretchen: What’s something you know now about forming healthy habits that you didn’t know when you were 18 years old?

Dan: A neuroscientist friend of mine once told me, “The brain is a pleasure-seeking machine. ” Usually, we do what makes us feel good. What I know now about habit formation that I didn’t know then is that I generally cannot create or break habits unless there is compelling self-interest involved.So, for example, with meditation, I was motivated to start the habit by the science that says it’s good for you—and I’ve been able to maintain it because, while the act of meditating is often quite tough, the “off-the-cushion” benefits are so readily apparent to me.

Gretchen: Do you have any habits that continually get in the way of your happiness?

Dan: Two biggies:1. Multitasking: I’ve seen all the studies that say our brains are not capable of concentrating on more than one thing at a time and that multitasking is a huge drag on efficiency and productivity. And yet, I still frequently find myself flitting between email, Twitter, phone calls, and whatever work I’m actually supposed to be doing.2. Mindless eating: I try very hard to eat healthfully, but I am a huge sucker for pasta, cheeseburgers, and cookies—and when I get into a feeding frenzy, it’s hard for me to stop. These episodes are almost always followed by a shame spiral.In theory, meditation should help with the above, since it teaches you to pay careful attention to whatever you’re doing right now. Alas, I still struggle. Hence the title of my book.

Gretchen: Have you ever managed to break an unhealthy habit? If so, how?

Dan: In my early thirties, as a young reporter for ABC News, I spent many years covering wars. When I got back from one particularly long and hairy run in Baghdad, I became depressed. In an act of towering stupidity, I began to self-medicate, dabbling with cocaine and ecstasy. In hindsight, it was an attempt, at least partly, to recreate some of the thrill of the war zone.A side-effect of all of this, as my doctor later explained to me, was that the drugs increased the level of adrenaline in my brain, which is what, in all likelihood, produced a panic attack I had on live television in 2004 on Good Morning America. The shrink I consulted about this decreed in no uncertain terms that I needed to stop doing drugs—immediately. Faced with the potential demise of my career, breaking this habit was a pretty obvious call.

Gretchen: Have you ever made a flash change, where you changed a major habit very suddenly?

Dan: In the summer after I graduated from high school, I did experience a “flash change. ” I was in my car, driving to go see some friends, and I decided—seemingly out of nowhere—that after years of being a mediocre high school student, I was going to truly apply myself in the next phase of my life. The next year, when my father saw my first college report card, he nearly cried.Interestingly, the fact that I did well in college has had zero practical impact on my career in television news. I don’t think any of my employers has ever asked about my grades. But that flash change established a long-lasting habit of hard work and ambition. Which, it must be said, has sometimes been to my detriment. It was, I now believe, my fervent desire to excel at my job that led me to plunge headlong into war zones without considering the psychological consequences—which, in turn, led to the drugs and the panic attack. I’ve found that meditation has really helped me strike a better balance between striving and stress.


Revue de presse

Startling, provocative, and often very funny . . . [10% HAPPIER] will convince even the most skeptical reader of meditation’s potential. (Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project)

10% HAPPIER is hands down the best book on meditation for the uninitiated, the skeptical, or the merely curious. . . . an insightful, engaging, and hilarious tour of the mind’s darker corners and what we can do to find a bit of peace. (Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence and Focus)

The science supporting the health benefits of meditation continues to grow as does the number of Americans who count themselves as practitioners but, it took reading 10% HAPPIER to make me actually want to give it a try. (Richard E. Besser, M.D., Chief Health and Medical Editor, ABC News)

An enormously smart, clear-eyed, brave-hearted, and quite personal look at the benefits of meditation that offers new insights as to how this ancient practice can help modern lives while avoiding the pitfall of cliché. This is a book that will help people, simply put. (Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love)

This brilliant, humble, funny story shows how one man found a way to navigate the non-stop stresses and demands of modern life and back to humanity by finally learning to sit around doing nothing. (Colin Beavan, author of No Impact Man)

In 10% Happier, Dan Harris describes in fascinating detail the stresses of working as a news correspondent and the relief he has found through the practice of meditation. This is an extremely brave, funny, and insightful book. Every ambitious person should read it. (Sam Harris, author of The End of Faith)

A compellingly honest, delightfully interesting, and at times heart-warming story of one highly intelligent man’s life-changing journey towards a deeper understanding of what makes us our very best selves. As Dan’s meditation practice deepens, I look forward to him being at least 11% happier, or more. (Chade-Meng Tan, author of Search Inside Yourself)

10% Happier is a spiritual adventure from a master storyteller. Mindfulness can make you happier. Read this to find out how. (George Stephanopoulos)

Part-science, part-memoir, and part self-help, Harris outlines specific ways he learned to, well, chill the f#%k out. (GQ)

A self-help guide even skeptics will embrace . . . Harris crushes stereotypes about meditation and recounts how it slashed his stress and quieted his anxious mind. (Parade)

Revealing . . . I’d recommend this to anyone. (USA Today, Pop Candy)

Harris never loses his sense of humor as he affably spotlights one man’s quest for internal serenity while concurrently navigating the slings and arrows of a hard-won career in the contemporary media spotlight. Friendly, practical advocacy for the power of mindfulness and enlightenment. (Kirkus)

Harris’s journey of discovery brought back lessons for all of us about our lives, too. (Diane Sawyer)

Lively . . . part reporting, part personal experience . . . By letting us hear the voice in his head - before and after he starts meditating—Harris makes a convincing case that if he can do it, we can, too. (Richmond Times-Dispatch)

Nightline co-anchor Dan Harris is an unlikely ambassador for mindfulness, but his new book . . . might be just the thing that gets people to unplug and recognize that all this multitasking is making us miserable and unhealthy. (xoJane)

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 757 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 258 pages
  • Editeur : Dey Street Books; Édition : Reprint (11 mars 2014)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00FJ376CS
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5 1 commentaire client
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°83.128 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  •  Voulez-vous faire un commentaire sur des images ou nous signaler un prix inférieur ?

click to open popover

Commentaires en ligne

5.0 étoiles sur 5
5 étoiles
1
4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoile
0
Voir le commentaire client
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Meilleurs commentaires des clients

Par arhat le 17 avril 2014
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Ce livre est attachant, une certaine sincérité transparait. Dan Harris raconte son expérience sur la voix de la spiritualité. Une approche objective et critique libre des aprioris religieux.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Une personne a trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x88c78eac) étoiles sur 5 2.209 commentaires
368 internautes sur 411 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Par Casey Ellis - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Well, I *have* read the book--got it on my Kindle a few minutes after 9 p.m., read til midnight and finished it this morning. Harris is funny, self-deprecating and one hell of a writer. I've been interested in Buddhism and mindfulness since a trip to Burma last year but did nothing concrete towards pursuing a practice. Now I am enthused and confident that I see how to begin. And, more importantly, how to continue when the going gets challenging. I wish I had more stars to give.
608 internautes sur 723 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x88ccfc90) étoiles sur 5 This book reads like a meditation journal. 19 avril 2014
Par queso7 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
I just finished reading 10% happier, and I really wanted to like it. I didn't. Here is why:

- If you are someone who is actually seeking advice on meditation technique, DO NOT buy this book. Even if you are a type-A, work-in-high-stress-situations-type, you would benefit much more from an author such as Jack Kornfield, who actually gives you undiluted Buddhist technique written in an incredibly user-friendly way. Jack gives you clear directions and rationale for why certain meditation techniques work. You'll try a few and see which ones work for you, and not use the rest. This book does not give you meditation instruction that works universally.

- The book ends with a a list of mindfulness "how-to's." The problem with this list is that, unlike the list of a truly experienced meditator who has the ability to distill really hard stuff into universally applicable guidance, Dan's list is HIS list. It didn't resonate for me. "Don't be a jerk" - that's not something that'll pop up in my head when someone is cutting me off on the highway. "Hide the Zen." "Meditate." (Seriously??) "The price of security is insecurity" - this is something of a Harris family catchphrase, but has absolutely zero meaning to me. Reading this book versus, say, The Joy of Living is akin to the experience of going to an university-level calculus class that's taught by the best professor in the school versus a crappy TA. A great teacher can boil really, really hard stuff down to a level that anyone can enjoy. A bad TA has you falling asleep in your chair. This book was written by the TA.

- A massive amount of this story is about how Dan Harris found Buddhism. In the meantime, he tries drugs and speaks to a few uber-religious pastor-types and spiritual "gurus." This next sentence will save you 85 pages of reading: if you already know you don't like organized religion, don't take advice from leaders of organized religion, or anyone who calls him/herself a guru. If you are truly type A, you would probably not want to wade through 85 pages just to get to this point.

If you want real meditation advice, or are wading into 'spiritual' waters, here are some of the books that have worked for me (an overly driven and anxious individual who turned to meditation to calm the - down):

Anything by Jack Kornfield, but A Path with Heart stands out (for a meditation beginner, this book stands out)
The Joy of Living, Yongey Rinpoche Mingyur / Eric Swanson (not as much technique, but a solid read and incorporates research findings)
The Heart of Yoga, Desikachar (getting more into yoga, but yoga philosophy and meditation are fundamentally linked... this book can also give you a nice alternative in case vipassana Buddhist meditation is not your thing).
29 internautes sur 32 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x88ccfc54) étoiles sur 5 A Skeptic's Guide to Meditation 28 mars 2014
Par L. Erickson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
This is a really great book for anyone who is skeptical about meditation, or who is turned off by the new-age or spiritual language that often accompanies it. Dan studies Insight meditation, which is rooted in Theraveda Buddhism and is a form of Vipassana, but many people who practice it consider themselves secular, and practice it apart from a Buddhist-based belief system. Dan covers a lot of the medical research into the benefits of meditation, as well as organizations that are teaching it, such as the Marines, Target Corporation, and General Mills.

Dan is very funny, and provides a lot of entertaining stories about challenges in his career, and his experiences on a 10-day silent meditation retreat. He also offers basic mindfulness meditation instructions, and an FAQ for beginning (and skeptical) meditators. My only complaint is that at times he is a bit judgmental of spiritual teachers such as Eckhart Tolle and Deepak Chopra. But on the other hand, this may resonate with his target audience. I know some people feel the book is very egotistical, but to me it came across as more of a newscaster/comedian voice. He opens up quite a bit about himself, including admitting to drug use early in his career, and various unsavory thoughts, so that humanized him in my eyes, and made me willing to put up with the occasionally arrogant or judgmental tone. He comes across as sincere in his desire to introduce people to meditation, and I can't really see any benefit to him in doing that, so I take his word for it that he just wants to share something that has been good for him.

The title comes from his attempts to explain his reasons for meditating to friends and colleagues. He finds that replying that meditation makes him '10% Happier' intrigues people, because it sounds real and attainable, but also makes it worth it. So overall, this book is a great memoir and introduction to meditation for anyone still on the fence about it, or skeptical.
58 internautes sur 69 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x88ccff48) étoiles sur 5 Thanks, Dan Harris, for a well-done book 12 mars 2014
Par Carol - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
People who have not read books should not be reviewing them! . Good for Dan who is willing to share a moving and authentic journey. Very funny and so well written. I admire this guy and kind of envy him. Thanks for all your hard found wisdom!
47 internautes sur 56 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x88ccffa8) étoiles sur 5 Awesome Book, Real Life Journey To Happiness! 3 novembre 2014
Par Steve Davis - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Awesome Book!! Opened my eyes to Meditation and Increased Happiness!!
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous