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Americanah par [Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi]
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Americanah Format Kindle

4.5 étoiles sur 5 40 commentaires client

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Format Kindle, 14 mai 2013
EUR 9,47

Longueur : 610 pages Word Wise: Activé Composition améliorée: Activé
Page Flip: Activé Langue : Anglais

Description du produit

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Princeton, in the summer, smelled of nothing, and although Ifemelu liked the tranquil greenness of the many trees, the clean streets and stately homes, the delicately overpriced shops, and the quiet, abiding air of earned grace, it was this, the lack of a smell, that most appealed to her, perhaps because the other American cities she knew well had all smelled distinctly. Philadelphia had the musty scent of history. New Haven smelled of neglect. Baltimore smelled of brine, and Brooklyn of sun-warmed garbage. But Princeton had no smell. She liked taking deep breaths here. She liked watching the locals who drove with pointed courtesy and parked their latest model cars outside the organic grocery store on Nassau Street or outside the sushi restaurants or outside the ice cream shop that had fifty different flavors including red pepper or outside the post office where effusive staff bounded out to greet them at the entrance. She liked the campus, grave with knowledge, the Gothic buildings with their vine-laced walls, and the way everything transformed, in the half-light of night, into a ghostly scene. She liked, most of all, that in this place of affluent ease, she could pretend to be someone else, someone specially admitted into a hallowed American club, someone adorned with certainty.
 
But she did not like that she had to go to Trenton to braid her hair. It was unreasonable to expect a braiding salon in Princeton—the few black locals she had seen were so light-skinned and lank-haired she could not imagine them wearing braids—and yet as she waited at Princeton Junction station for the train, on an afternoon ablaze with heat, she wondered why there was no place where she could braid her hair. The chocolate bar in her handbag had melted. A few other people were waiting on the platform, all of them white and lean, in short, flimsy clothes. The man standing closest to her was eating an ice cream cone; she had always found it a little irresponsible, the eating of ice cream cones by grown-up American men, especially the eating of ice cream cones by grown-up American men in public. He turned to her and said, “About time,” when the train finally creaked in, with the familiarity strangers adopt with each other after sharing in the disappointment of a public service. She smiled at him. The graying hair on the back of his head was swept forward, a comical arrangement to disguise his bald spot. He had to be an academic, but not in the humanities or he would be more self-conscious. A firm science like chemistry, maybe. Before, she would have said, “I know,” that peculiar American expression that professed agreement rather than knowledge, and then she would have started a conversation with him, to see if he would say something she could use in her blog. People were flattered to be asked about themselves and if she said nothing after they spoke, it made them say more. They were conditioned to fill silences. If they asked what she did, she would say vaguely, “I write a lifestyle blog,” because saying “I write an anonymous blog called Raceteenth or Various Observations About American Blacks (Those Formerly Known as Negroes) by a Non-American Black” would make them uncomfortable. She had said it, though, a few times. Once to a dreadlocked white man who sat next to her on the train, his hair like old twine ropes that ended in a blond fuzz, his tattered shirt worn with enough piety to convince her that he was a social warrior and might make a good guest blogger. “Race is totally overhyped these days, black people need to get over themselves, it’s all about class now, the haves and the have-nots,” he told her evenly, and she used it as the opening sentence of a post titled “Not All Dreadlocked White American Guys Are Down.” Then there was the man from Ohio, who was squeezed next to her on a flight. A middle manager, she was sure, from his boxy suit and contrast collar. He wanted to know what she meant by “lifestyle blog,” and she told him, expecting him to become reserved, or to end the conversation by saying something defensively bland like “The only race that matters is the human race.” But he said, “Ever write about adoption? Nobody wants black babies in this country, and I don’t mean biracial, I mean black. Even the black families don’t want them.”
 
He told her that he and his wife had adopted a black child and their neighbors looked at them as though they had chosen to become martyrs for a dubious cause. Her blog post about him, “Badly-Dressed White Middle Managers from Ohio Are Not Always What You Think,” had received the highest number of comments for that month. She still wondered if he had read it. She hoped so. Often, she would sit in cafés, or airports, or train stations, watching strangers, imagining their lives, and wondering which of them were likely to have read her blog. Now her ex-blog. She had written the final post only days ago, trailed by two hundred and seventy-four comments so far. All those readers, growing month by month, linking and cross-posting, knowing so much more than she did; they had always frightened and exhilarated her. SapphicDerrida, one of the most frequent posters, wrote: I’m a bit surprised by how personally I am taking this. Good luck as you pursue the unnamed “life change” but please come back to the blogosphere soon. You’ve used your irreverent, hectoring, funny and thought-provoking voice to create a space for real conversations about an important subject. Readers like SapphicDerrida, who reeled off statistics and used words like “reify” in their comments, made Ifemelu nervous, eager to be fresh and to impress, so that she began, over time, to feel like a vulture hacking into the carcasses of people’s stories for something she could use. Sometimes making fragile links to race. Sometimes not believing herself. The more she wrote, the less sure she became. Each post scraped off yet one more scale of self until she felt naked and false.
 
The ice-cream-eating man sat beside her on the train and, to discourage conversation, she stared fixedly at a brown stain near her feet, a spilled frozen Frappuccino, until they arrived at Trenton. The platform was crowded with black people, many of them fat, in short, flimsy clothes. It still startled her, what a difference a few minutes of train travel made. During her first year in America, when she took New Jersey Transit to Penn Station and then the subway to visit Aunty Uju in Flatlands, she was struck by how mostly slim white people got off at the stops in Manhattan and, as the train went further into Brooklyn, the people left were mostly black and fat. She had not thought of them as “fat,” though. She had thought of them as “big,” because one of the first things her friend Ginika told her was that “fat” in America was a bad word, heaving with moral judgment like “stupid” or “bastard,” and not a mere description like “short” or “tall.” So she had banished “fat” from her vocabulary. But “fat” came back to her last winter, after almost thirteen years, when a man in line behind her at the supermarket muttered, “Fat people don’t need to be eating that shit,” as she paid for her giant bag of Tostitos. She glanced at him, surprised, mildly offended, and thought it a perfect blog post, how this stranger had decided she was fat. She would file the post under the tag “race, gender and body size.” But back home, as she stood and faced the mirror’s truth, she realized that she had ignored, for too long, the new tightness of her clothes, the rubbing together of her inner thighs, the softer, rounder parts of her that shook when she moved. She was fat.
 
She said the word “fat” slowly, funneling it back and forward, and thought about all the other things she had learned not to say aloud in America. She was fat. She was not curvy or big-boned; she was fat, it was the only word that felt true. And she had ignored, too, the cement in her soul. Her blog was doing well, with thousands of unique visitors each month, and she was earning good speaking fees, and she had a fellowship at Princeton and a relationship with Blaine—“You are the absolute love of my life,” he’d written in her last birthday card—and yet there was cement in her soul. It had been there for a while, an early morning disease of fatigue, a bleakness and borderlessness. It brought with it amorphous longings, shapeless desires, brief imaginary glints of other lives she could be living, that over the months melded into a piercing homesickness. She scoured Nigerian websites, Nigerian profiles on Facebook, Nigerian blogs, and each click brought yet another story of a young person who had recently moved back home, clothed in American or British degrees, to start an investment company, a music production business, a fashion label, a magazine, a fast-food franchise. She looked at photographs of these men and women and felt the dull ache of loss, as though they had prised open her hand and taken something of hers. They were living her life. Nigeria became where she was supposed to be, the only place she could sink her roots in without the constant urge to tug them out and shake off the soil. And, of course, there was also Obinze. Her first love, her first lover, the only person with whom she had never felt the need to explain herself. He was now a husband and father, and they had not been in touch in years, yet she could not pretend that he was not a part of her homesickness, or that she did not often think of him, sifting through their past, looking for portents of what she could not name.
The rude stranger in the supermarket—who knew what problems he was wrestling with, haggard and thin-lipped as he was—had intended to offend her but had instead prodded her awake.
 
She began to plan and to dream, to apply for jobs in Lagos. She did not tell Blaine at first, because she wanted to finish her fellowship at Princeton, and then after her fellowship ended, she did not tell him because she wanted to give herself time to be sure. But as the weeks passed, she knew she would never be sure. So she told him that she was moving back home, and she added, “I have to,” knowing he would hear in her words the sound of an ending.
 
“Why?” Blaine asked, almost automatically, stunned by her announcement. There they were, in his living room in New Haven, awash in soft jazz and daylight, and she looked at him, her good, bewildered man, and felt the day take on a sad, epic quality. They had lived together for three years, three years free of crease, like a smoothly ironed sheet, until their only fight, months ago, when Blaine’s eyes froze with blame and he refused to speak to her. But they had survived that fight, mostly because of Barack Obama, bonding anew over their shared passion. On election night, before Blaine kissed her, his face wet with tears, he held her tightly as though Obama’s victory was also their personal victory. And now here she was telling him it was over.
“Why?” he asked. He taught ideas of nuance and complexity in his classes and yet he was asking her for a single reason, the cause. But she had not had a bold epiphany and there was no cause; it was simply that layer after layer of discontent had settled in her, and formed a mass that now propelled her. She did not tell him this, because it would hurt him to know she had felt that way for a while, that her relationship with him was like being content in a house but always sitting by the window and looking out.
 
“Take the plant,” he said to her, on the last day she saw him, when she was packing the clothes she kept in his apartment. He looked defeated, standing slump-shouldered in the kitchen. It was his houseplant, hopeful green leaves rising from three bamboo stems, and when she took it, a sudden crushing loneliness lanced through her and stayed with her for weeks. Sometimes, she still felt it. How was it possible to miss something you no longer wanted? Blaine needed what she was unable to give and she needed what he was unable to give, and she grieved this, the loss of what could have been.

Revue de presse

An extremely thoughtful, subtly provocative exploration of structural inequality, of different kinds of oppression, of gender roles, of the idea of home. Subtle, but not afraid to pull its punches Alex Clark, Guardian

Her new novel is a tour de force ... The artistry with which Adichie keeps her story moving, while animating the complex anxieties in which the characters live and work, is hugely impressive Mail on Sunday

A brilliant novel: epic in scope, personal in resonance and with lots to say Elizabeth Day, Observer

Her observations about race are fresh and incisive ... Read Americanah to find out and enjoy the chance to visit three continents, observe a wide array of subcultures and meet complicated and interesting characters and to go wherever Adichie chooses to take us Sunday Times

Adichie writes superb dialogue straight from the mouth of her people ... This is a delicious, important novel from a writer with a great deal to say The Times

A brilliant exploration of being African in America ... an urgent and important book, further evidence that its author is a real talent Sunday Telegraph

Adichie is terrific on human interactions ... Adichie s writing always has an elegant shimmer to is ... [Americanah is] wise, entertaining and unendingly perceptive Independent on Sunday

As she did so masterfully with Half of a Yellow Sun, Adichie paints on a grand canvas, boldly and confidently, equally adept at conveying the complicated political backdrop of Lagos as she is in bringing us into the day-to-day lives of her many new Americans ... This is a very funny, very warm and moving intergenerational epic that confirms Adiche s virtuosity, boundless empathy and searing social acuity. Dave Eggers

Superb ... a large, ambitious book ... powerful, heartfelt and evocative. Once again Adichie excels with her depiction of Nigeria ...The dialogue sparkles ... she is a writer of huge talent who just keeps getting better Literary Review

--Literary Review


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 4495 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 610 pages
  • Editeur : Anchor (14 mai 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00A9ET4MC
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Lecteur d’écran : Pris en charge
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.5 étoiles sur 5 40 commentaires client
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Un livre très dense centré sur l'identité raciale (ici une africaine aux USA). Bien écrit, on a envie de continuer, bien observé, intéressant. La fin, très happy end, m'a déçue, fin heureuse à l'eau de rose de roman de gare. Sinon, bon roman.
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Une histoire très moderne et très juste sur l'immigration et la question de "race" aux Etats-unis et en Europe.
Obinze et Efu sont touchants et leur histoire nous ouvre les yeux sur les difficultés et les obstacles rencontrés par les personnes cherchant à émigrer puis à s'intégrer dans un nouveau pays.
C'est un roman agréable à lire et souvent très drôle. Je recommande!
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Par C why le 13 mars 2017
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I heard several times about this book before buying it. The author does a very realistic of what life can be for immigrants in Europe and US. My only regret in this book is the way things end up between Obinze and Efumela. Reading the pieces of Efumela blog about race was a delight!
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I enjoy all her books and enthusiastically recommend her to anyone who's listening. Beautifully descriptive and well defined narrative. Loved!
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Le résumé du livre se suffit en lui-même et pour vous laisser découvrir l'histoire, je vais me contenter de vous dire ce que j'ai ressenti en lisant ce livre.
Elle nous parle de « race » en décomplexant complètement le sujet, elle le ramène à la compréhension de monsieur tout le monde. Elle dit des vérités de façon subtile sans pointer du doigt le moindre coupable. Elle dit des choses qu'on ressent tous les jours et cela fait plaisir de savoir qu'à l'autre bout du monde quelqu'un d'autre éprouve, ressent les mêmes choses que vous et surtout sait les retranscrire avec autant de brio.
C'est bien écrit, c'est émouvant, parfois c'est drôle, souvent triste lorsqu'on se rend compte de l'importance encore accordée à la race dans nos sociétés actuelles. Nous faisons toujours face aux mêmes barrières raciales, religieuses (que ce soit aux USA où se situe l'histoire ou ailleurs) alors que les nouvelles technologies sont censés nous rapprocher. Le monde n'a pas encore changé, pour le moment on se cache c'est tout....
Bref j'adore, j'adore, j'adore et le conseille à tous ceux qui s'intéressent à de tels sujets traités avec réalisme, compréhension et une profonde compassion.
Cet auteur est génial. Elle prend le temps d'écrire et à chaque fois l'attente valait largement la peine.
Vous pouvez la découvrir en commençant par son ouvrage « Half of a yellow sun » quelque chose de tout aussi fabuleux.
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J'attendais avec impatience le dernier Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie et je n'ai pas été déçue. Sa plume est toujours aussi fine. Ce n'est pas seulement qu'elle écrit bien, elle a surtout cette capacité à pointer le doigt là où ça fait mal avec une ironie et une subtilité qui forcent l'admiration.

Sa façon de traiter de la question de la race aux Etats-unis est à la fois intelligente et drôle et surtout tellement vrai. Pas de fausse pudeur, pas de politiquement correct, c'est un plaisir à chaque page. Ses personnages - tous, les principaux comme les secondaires- sont attachants jamais caricaturaux, tout en subtilité ( oui encore!). L'histoire d'amour ( ou les histoires d'amour) sont décrites avec poésie, humour et précision. Ca renvoie à des choses que l'on a pu ressentir ou observer mais elle trouve les mots justes. Bref, un vrai bon moment qui se prolonge parce qu'on y repense encore et encore.

Et comme on se le disait avec une amie, on a juste envie de dire à l'auteur, do you want to be my best friend ? We would have so much fun !
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Une love story qui n'a rien de mièvre , mais avant tout, à travers le personnage central et son blog , à travers ses rencontres et son vécu , un tableau très pointu de la société au Nigéria , à Londres et surtout sur la côte est des USA ; une description brillante des comportements face au problème de l'intégration et du racisme au moment où Obama est élu président .
Un gros livre qu'on ne lâche pas !!!
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Lors d'une interview aux Etats-Unis, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie ("CNA") s'est offusquée lorsque la journaliste qui l'interrogeait a qualifié Americanah d'"Autant en emporte le vent" nigérian.
Et pourtant il y a de ça dans l'histoire d'amour d'Ifemelu. Une femme belle, intelligente et indépendante va conquérir le monde (et qui plus est le Nouveau Monde) grâce à son esprit et malgré la couleur de sa peau, connaître l'amour avec un riche homme blanc et blond et un séduisant professeur noir de Yale (qu'espérer de mieux dans la hiérarchie du partenaire désirable aux Etats-Unis ?) avant de retourner dans son Nigeria natal pour renouer avec son amour de lycée devenu puissant magnat de l'immobilier. Celui-ci divorcera brutalement de sa (sublime) femme en jurant de tout faire pour voir tous les jours sa petite fille de trois ans (Rhett Butler n'aurait pas été jusque là, mais il faut vivre avec son époque) pour vivre avec elle un amour qui aura résisté au temps (quinze années), à la distance (deux continents) et à la compétition (bien que lui ne semble pas avoir eu autant de partenaires qu'elle). L'histoire d'amour est sans aucun doute charmante et pleine de rebondissements mais oui, n'en déplaise à CNA, il y a de l'"Autant en emporte le vent" dans cette relation entre Ifemelu et Obinze qui fait chavirer les cœurs tendres.
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