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Beethoven : les 9 Symphonies (Coffret 5CD)

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  • CD (26 février 2007)
  • Nombre de disques: 5
  • Label: Rca Red Seal
  • ASIN : B0000CNTLU
  • Autres éditions : CD  |  Téléchargement MP3
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Description du produit

BEETHOVEN : LES 9 SYMPHONIES (COFFRET 5CD)

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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Toscanini / NBC Sym: Beethoven: Better sound's the thing !!!! ...... 24 mars 2013
Par drdanfee - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
Judging from the somewhat sonically compromised recordings available, hearing Arturo Toscanini live really must have been a tremendous musical experience. With the current set of complete Beethoven symphonies remastered to best mono-channeled sonics to date from the archived masters, we can finally hear into the boxy, cramped acoustics of the recording studio and by hearing into the orchestra departments, we can more accurately hear the extremely high level of technical discipline which the great conductor encouraged, if not demanded from his players. Significant unanimity of instrumental attack is filled out with significant single-mindedness when it comes to releasing the note(s), and finally we can hear something like an almost uncanny one-ness of phrasing and tempo, both within instrumental groups and across them.

The spillover is music, music, music. Once he got all his players sufficiently together, Toscanini had a clear (and typically, compelling) vision of where the composer who wrote the music wanted the music to go. Surely like any gifted music-maker, Toscanini no doubt had his worse days and his better days. After listening through all nine Beethoven symphonies in remastered sonics on headphones, a modern listener can pretty much finally get enough of what Toscanini was doing with his players, and when it comes to Beethoven, it's fairly difficult in the final analysis to gainsay Toscanini as at least one way that Beethoven does sound, can sound, ... and perhaps ought to sound?

Each one of the nine stands tall as utterly indispensable in these famous Toscanini readings which, as people duly note, have hardly been out of print since their first release on vinyl. The familiar dynamism of the odd-numbered symphonies comes across without hesitation; but the even-numbered works have genuine Beethoven force and energy, too.

Most of the tempos in this set are actually mainstream, especially if we recall the upwards gear shifting of tempos and pulses that has been let loose widely by HIP instruments and musical manners. But Toscanini was in his own time a unique Trail Blazer. We might now recognize Toscanini as the kind of musical leader who helped make the tempos just one aspect of our widely embraced aspirations for music to be rendered, its expressive vision(s) all of a piece. Often Toscanini lets us hear a punchy, vital Beethoven in both the tempo/pulse and the details because his orchestra players tend towards such technical wizardry that their detailed yet single-minded execution makes Beethoven sound like his muse had set an ancient god's sandals on fire. (Hermes, Mercury, take your pick) If faster tempos are dazzling without losing substantial Beethoven weight and musical vitality, even slower tempos have a palpable sense of direction that often captures structural harmonies in proportions we cannot avoid sensing.

For a while, the controversy in New York was between Toscanini and Bruno Walter's ways with music. But a careful listen to Bruno Walter (in Beethoven, Brahms, and other composers) may show that while the Walter vision left plenty of room for shaping and flexibility of lines and textures, Bruno Walter had nearly as deep an indebtedness to the underlying sense of flow and palpable proportion as we can expect to hear from Toscanini. However exaggerated and polarized the trash talked competition between these two Great Figures tended to become, just listening to Bruno Walter in Beethoven shows that he was as tough-minded when it came to harmonic-structural roots, to tempo proportions, as Toscanini, though each conductor was so distinctive, a listener hardly ever will mistake one for the other.

Which prompts me to wonder out loud in passing: What in the world has happened to the Bruno Walter set of all nine Beethoven symphonies? If Walter's sixth symphony (Pastoral) was something like a perennial calling card on the world's best podiums, his traversal of all the symphonies is as strong and true as anybody else. And compared to some of the jet-setting Brand Name Conductors of today, few come close if we pause to play their Beethoven side by side, with either this Toscanini set or with Walter's.

Beyond superb technique, Toscanini was a past master of music's flow and inner-outer tensions. (Ditto, Bruno Walter, folks) Perhaps the only living conductor before us now who can mirror Toscanini's grasp of vertical ensemble, (so clear yet so expressive, many instruments being played as almost one voice) would be Lorin Maazel (except that Maazel is often caught in his recordings as less consistent or single-minded than either Toscanini or Walter? Okay, add in Carlos Kleiber on one of his good days?).

On recordings you could also pretty much get a similar high level grasp and breadth of vision from George Szell and Guido Cantelli. When it comes to Cantelli, I bet many listeners would take a trade for his music-making, even if we held people to giving up five newbies of today for one Cantelli.

Whatever could possibly be 'wrong' about Toscanini's traversal of these nine symphonies, the complaints would unlikely get around to accusing Arturo of 'superficiality' or of 'effects for the sake of effects.' Reaching hard to just beyond our fingers, maybe we could carp how Toscanini does not let us hear the distinctions and differences among these nine as might well be the case, nor let us hear the Beethoven change from young adulthood to old age?

Just playing the first two symphonies awakens a hunger to hear more from Beethoven. Don't be surprised if this set comes down off the shelf and the box stays open for a longer while than many other, more recent complete sets with state of the art recorded sound. Finally the NBC players can be heard richly enough to get deeper ears into their virtuosity, and the more one listens the deeper into a vital, vibrant Beethoven ethos the music-making seems to go. Yes, touches of boxiness and compression in the monophonic sound-stage remain, but the detraction and compromise of transcendent music-making is less of a downward drag than has ever been the case with a release of these discs.

Finally, Sony(BMG) getting something right? It's about time I say. And, now about those Bruno Walter master's: super-audio? Any time soon? Yeah that's what I thought you'd say.
10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Important and fine historical performances 28 octobre 2010
Par William J. Mertens - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
Let's first get the quality of the audio out of the way. These recordings were made around 1950, and even after improved mastering, the monaural sound is below that of a contemporary digital recording or for that matter the Living Stereo analog recordings that RCA was making just 10 years later. Anyone who wants sonically brilliant recordings of the Beethoven symphonies should try a different set. There are many other quite good sets available, on both digital and analog recordings and in different performing styles.

The reason to get this set is to hear Toscanini conduct and, specifically, to hear how he approached these foundational works late in his career. To my own non-expert ears, Toscanini fully earned his reputation as perhaps the greatest conductor of his time. He had precise control of his musicians' playing. He communicated a real feel for the nuances of the music. Yes, his tempos were much faster than was common at the time or that was fashionable for Beethoven performances for two decades or so after his death. Toscanini took what he called an "objective" approach to the music, which seems to have meant among other things observing Beethoven's own tempo markings. Toscanini's reputation seems to have fallen after his death for such reasons.

But fashions change. The period instrument and "historically informed performance" movement that took off in the late 1970s or so eventually led to conductors again taking Beethoven's own tempo markings seriously and observing them in performance. New and influential recordings of the Beethoven symphony cycle were released including those of the British conductors John Eliot Gardiner and Roger Norrington. They proved that faster tempos restored a drive and thrill to the music that could get lost in more stately performances, some of which, in comparison, began sounding ponderous and dull.

As this Toscanini Beethoven cycle shows, Toscanini understood that decades earlier. And these performances are thrilling, as well as intelligent and insightful. If you can get over the quality of the sound (which, really, isn't that bad), these recordings are fine simply to enjoy Beethoven's music, and they also are helpful in understanding why Toscanini was the important conductor that he was, through much of the twentieth century.
28 internautes sur 28 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Beethoven's Nine Symphonies 22 novembre 2007
Par Tristan Whalen - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
The sound quality of the symphonies vary, depending on where the recording comes from. I list that information here from the booklet included with the box set. Recordings from Carnegie Hall sound better, comparable to Deutsche Grammaphon early stereo recordings. Recordings from NBC Broadcasts generally sound like early live recordings, comparable to the sound quality of EMI's recording of Furtwangler's performance of the Ninth (Great Recordings of the Century).

No. 1 - Recorded December 21, 1951 in Carnegie Hall

No. 2 - Recorded November 7, 1949 & October 9, 1951 in Carnegie Hall

No. 3 - NBC Broadcast of December 6, 1953 in Carnegie Hall
Note: Unfortunately the worst sound-quality of the set; some coughs are audible in the quiet parts; I want to go back in time and give the guy a cough drop. But the performance is incredible; indeed an honorable mention for this work in "1001 Classical Recordings You Must Hear Before You Die". I think it's worth it to have Toscanini's performance over one with better sound but muddled conducting (ahem...Karajan 1963...ahem)

No. 4 - NBC Broadcast of February 3, 1951 in Carnegie Hall

No. 5 - NBC Broadcast of March 22, 1952 in Carnegie Hall
Note: Fortunately, this one is an exception and sounds much better than the other broadcasts. I think Toscanini does the BEST rendition of the famous eight note intro (even better than Kleiber's too melodramatic reading).

No. 6 - Recorded January 14, 1952 in Carnegie Hall
Note: Smooth and lush sound, a beautiful piece in Toscanini's hands that doesn't get "smothered" in "sentimentality" (quoted from the booklet). The booklet states that Toscanini's "retouchings of Beethoven's orchestration" in the 4th mvmt's storm provide one example to counter the "absurd notion" that Toscanini played everything "exactly as written". What, I ask, is the problem with playing pieces exactly as written? I guess we can't give Beethoven too much credit (sarcasm).

No. 7 - Recorded November 9, 1951 & NBC broadcast of November 10, 1951 in Carnegie Hall

No. 8 - Recorded November 10, 1952 in Carnegie Hall

No. 9 - Recorded March 31-April 1, 1952 in Carnegie Hall
Note: Best sound of them all, and the perfect finish is worth the whole set. Compare Toscanini's 2nd mvmt time - 13:09 - to Furtwangler's 12:00, Karajan's 11:00, and Fricsay's 10:32, and decide of Toscanini conducts to fast. An essential Ninth.

Audiophiles with high performance speakers will probably settle for inferior (or less faithful) performances of these symphonies for high-tech recordings, so I don't recommend this for them. But I do recommend this for anyone who wants to hear all nine of Ludwig van Beethoven's symphonies.

My original review:
As a new fan of Beethoven, I searched for a set of his nine symphonies to listen to for the first time in my life. Needless to say, it had to be near perfection (and still fit into my college-student budget), and so I came upon this set of Toscanini's performances around 1950. A little research said that this was certainly a must-have, and a quick glance at the incredible price sealed the deal. As soon as it arrived, I spent the next couple of weeks finding a little place to be alone and listen to an entire symphony, and every single time it was amazing.

The sound quality is fine...reading the reviews made me worry that there'd be static or fuzz throughout the recording (bringing me bitter memories of my Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall set, where the static overwhelmed the music). But no, the beautiful sound came through clear and pure.

I would recommend this even to beginners at classical music, since Toscanini's performances are powerful, intense, fun, and glorious...whatever Beethoven would have wanted.

The CDs are in a nice cardboard box and each CD is in its own cardboard sleeve with similar art as the cover you see pictured. Also included is a nice booklet (in three languages) that gives a neat history and brief analysis of each symphony, plus there was a picture of a page of Beethoven's draft of the Fifth and of his earpiece. The entire package is a nice and elegant presentation.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Beethven unsurpassed! 9 mars 2016
Par Van - Publié sur Amazon.com
Achat vérifié
These seem to be the Cargegie Hall recordings (lacking the "dead" room sound of Studio 8-H). If I am wrong I apologize. The performances are pure Toscanini..that is to say pure genius and pure Beethoven. Maestro Tocscanini in these remastered but very comfortable monophonic recordings has never been surpassed.
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Stretch your ears! 2 septembre 2010
Par S. Dawes - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
Listen beyond the archival tone of these recordings and you will easily find a master craftsman at work. The legendary maestro elevated his NBC Symphony Orchestra to great heights of precision and excellence. The beauty and majesty of Beethoven's symphonies are preserved here in typical Toscanini perfection.

There are endless recordings of the Beethoven symphony cycle, and many are worthy of your time and consideration. But if you seek the ideal bond of composer and interpreter, without a demand for state-of-the-art fidelity, this is your collection. Indispensable!!!
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