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Beethoven : Concertos pour piano n° 4 et n° 5 "Empereur"

3 étoiles sur 5
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3 étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires provenant des USA

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Détails sur le produit

  • Chef d'orchestre: Colin Davis
  • Compositeur: Ludwig van Beethoven
  • CD (26 mars 2012)
  • Nombre de disques: 1
  • Label: Decca
  • ASIN : B005JS7VK0
  • Autres versions : CD  |  Téléchargement MP3
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30
18:30
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2
30
5:30
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3
30
9:04
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4
30
20:28
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5
30
9:08
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6
30
10:09
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Description du produit

CONCERTO POUR PIANO N°4-5

Commentaires en ligne

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Amazon.com: 3.0 étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A somewhat controversial pair of performances which will either meet with approval or disapproval but not indifference 26 novembre 2012
Par I. Giles - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
Stephen Kovacevich's survey of the 5 Beethoven concertos has been a staple item in the Philips catalogue for years. They are the sort of performance that is regularly referred back to as a benchmark issue.

In this case these performances have switched label to Decca, part of the same group, and are differently coupled. Both performances have the same hallmarks as both are strongly presented with sharply underlined accents and with the most being made of the dynamics. The orchestras are both well directed in the same manner by Colin Davis who is at one with the overall concept. There is a strong forward pace maintained. The recordings are well defined and are full toned.

It is at this point that some would find this series of performances controversially direct, even matter-of-fact to the point of being aggressive. Others find the performances refreshingly direct and, lacking in excess warmth, correctly placed in style as Classical rather than Romantic in period.

Consequently therefore, if your taste in these late Beethoven concertos is for strong and virile performances that avoid much in the way of expressive phrasing and which concentrate on an accurate delivery of the notes, then I would suggest that these may well be added to the short-list, particularly at their present advantageous price point. This is not Beethoven for cautious people though but will suit those who like to stride ahead purposefully!

There are other versions to consider which could claim to be within period but without any suggestion of aggressiveness. Either of the Kempff sets would be an obvious reference. A more modern alternative might be the set by Paul Lewis and for those interested in a more period aware performance without using any more than period brass, there is the excellent set by Bronfman with Zinman at bargain price.

For those who would like to add more drama there are the excellent re-mastered Fleisher performances with Szell and for a fine romantically inclined version of this same coupling there is an excellent re-mastered disc with Arrau where Davis takes a very different view to match.

These two performances by Bishop and Davis with most likely be controversial meeting either with approval or Disapproval but not indifference.
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2.0 étoiles sur 5 ** 1/2 Aggressive readings that have raised eyebrows for a long time 30 janvier 2013
Par Santa Fe Listener - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
The young Stephen Kovacevich and Colin Davis were a productive team in the seventies, much loved by British critics, and some of their recordings, like the three Bartok concertos, have stood up well over the years. Their Beethoven concerto cycle, however, divides opinion. There aren't may rivals to this Fourth Cto. that decide, as Davis and Kovacevich do, to thrust the work aggressively into the world of the emperor Cto. Davis's conducting is brusque and without charm. The BBC Sym. are no better than good enough, and the original engineering from Philips puts the piano so far forward that the orchestra becomes background noise, allowing almost no woodwind detail to emerge. The finale is taken at a fast clip with an inflexible rhythm that destroys any grace that Kovacevich might have reached for, not that he does.

The Emperor is on a big scale, with the LSO - sounding considerably more accomplished than the BBC - punching out the long orchestral introduction to the first movement with crash-and-bang crudeness. Kovacevich follows suit, only to drop intermittently into exaggerated sotto voce before the next explosion. the overall impresison is callow. Everything settles down for the subdued lyricism of the slow movement, which here sounds too matter-of-fact, as if showing affection for the music is forbidden. Kovacevich indulges in barely audible pianissimo at times, which consorts oddly with his obviously impatient phrasing. The best movement is probably the finale, where it's still crash-and-bang but aiming at bravura rather than tepid classicism.

In all, a strange approach that ha raised eyebrows from its appearance and still does.
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