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Beethoven: Violin Concerto / Brahms: Violin Concerto CD, Enregistrement original remasterisé, Import

4,4 étoiles sur 5
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4,4 étoiles sur 5 8 commentaires provenant des USA

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Détails sur le produit

  • Chef d'orchestre: William Steinberg
  • Compositeur: Ludwig Van Beethoven, Johannes Brahms
  • CD (11 septembre 2001)
  • Nombre de disques: 1
  • Format : CD, Enregistrement original remasterisé, Import
  • Label: Mis
  • ASIN : B00005NW05
  • Autres versions : Téléchargement MP3
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  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 389.028 en Musique (Voir les 100 premiers en Musique)
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21:13
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9:17
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8:48
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19:36
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30
8:55
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7:39
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Commentaires en ligne

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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta) (Peut contenir des commentaires issus du programme Early Reviewer Rewards)

Amazon.com: 4.4 étoiles sur 5 8 commentaires
17 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Milstein at the top of his Game 8 septembre 2006
Par Doug - Haydn Fan - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
Recorded in 1957 and 1954 respectfully, these are not for those of you who insist on modern digital recordings. However, if you love great violin playing look no further. Amazon has lowered the price to under eight dollars as further inducement, though to be brutally honest there are thousands of classical reissues that go for far more as "rarities" and cannot hold a candle to Milstein's playing. As early as 1955 David Hall was touting Milstein's recording of the Brahms Concerto offered here as "doing him full justice as an artist and a musician". Since then Milstein's achievement has been universally acknowledged as perhaps his single greatest recording. Almost all critics believe he was one of the very top violinists of the last century. This performance shows why.
Milstein wrote the cadenzas for both concertos, and both show refinement and melodic thoughtfulness over busywork or facile display. I am fortunate to have the original records, the first issued in the early days of long-playing records. To my ear an A - B comparison reveals the remastering was very successful with most of Milstein's extraordinary and entrancing tone intact on the CD.
Steinberg who was always underrated does a fine job here with the Pittsburg Symphony Orchestra. In several places the older sound flattens their tone out, but generally they sound good and always are alert, consistently on hand to offer the soloist well-integrated bracing support. This was an orchestra that played Beethoven very well under Steinberg - they would later go on to record a complete cycle of the symphonies when it was still considered something of an undertaking. Their perfromance of the Beethoven seventh symphony (in fine stereo) shines out from that series - a fine example of musical architecture and propulsion. Steinberg could be very good - his DG recording of the Planets and Also Sprach with the Boston Symphony shows him at his best - it is a modern day classic recorded near the end of his career.
But this recording belongs to Milstein, and if you are not familiar with him and love violin playing you could do no better than this issue. And for playing like this the sooner the better! Wonderful CD.
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Milstein shines 15 janvier 2007
Par Anthony Westgate - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
No other violinist has a silvery tone quite like Nathan Milstein. To have a coupling of his recordings of the two greatest violin concertos is a rare treat indeed. His perfomance of the Beethoven is unsurpassed in its lightness of touch - the slow movement really is heavenly!

The orchestral accompaniment is well judged; it's just a shame that, even with digital remastering, it doesn't come over with the quite the depth and clarity of detail of a modern recording. However, given the choice between that and a fine performance, I'll choose the latter every time.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Five Stars 26 octobre 2014
Par David E. Miller - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
Very good
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 splendid performances in very good mid-50's sound 6 juillet 2014
Par Stanley Crowe - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
These performances were recorded in 1954 (Brahms) and 1955 (Beethoven), and the sound is remarkably good in this remastering, with the 1955 sound seeming just a bit the more focused of the two. It's in the Legge class, with a good balance between soloist and orchestra, and the performances are characterful and lively. Credit is due to William Steinberg here, who conducts with tremendous drive, really pushing forward, and yet allowing Milstein the expressive freedom to make adjustments of tempo and dynamics in the solo parts that keep the music from sounding too bland or too driven. What Steinberg provides is just what's missing from Zinman's orchestral setting for Hilary Hahn's playing -- variety, energy, and wit.

Milstein is simply superb -- the sound well-focused, the phrasing alert, the transitions well-managed, and his own good-sounding cadenzas well played. There is no technical challenge that seems beyond Milstein (b. 1903) in these performances. In the finales of both concertos, he finds a sense of fun, and its a pleasure to hear him. The slow movements are played with eloquence and restraint. For my taste, Grumiaux and Schneiderhan catch a bit more of the sublimity in these slow movements. The long first movements are totally successful, though -- they're both very long, and the energy and variety that Milstein and Steinberg command keep them fresh and the listener freshly responsive. Back when I started collecting recorded music in the late 1960's, recordings by Milstein were commonly seen in the shops -- I heard him live once, c. 1970, with Dorati and the National Symphony -- but one doesn't hear much of him nowadays. He was the real deal, though.

NOTE: Milstein re-recorded the Brahms concerto with Fistoulari and the Philharmonia in stereo around 1960. Paired with the Tchaikovsky (with Steinberg), it's available on a Seraphim CD, and I have a review of it. It's a fine performance, but I like this one better.
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Sweetness and purity of tone allied to scrupulous musicianship 12 novembre 2010
Par Ralph Moore - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
Let me say that the only reason for my deducting a star from these magical performances is to acknowledge, and warn potential buyers, that they are in mono only. The Beethoven is from 1957 and the Brahms 1954 and thus obviously just before the stereo era; otherwise the sound is very clean and clear and the silver purity of Milstein's totally unfussy playing is more than enough justification for recommending these accounts over modern, stereo recordings, as long as you are tolerant of the cramped acoustic.

I am one of those utterly seduced by Milstein's virtuosity; he possessed a brilliant but never cool tone, impeccable intonation and extraordinary dexterity. The cadenzas are, bravely, his own, but there is nothing of the showman about his approach: his respect for Steinberg and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra results in a genuine partnership. These are taut, yet lyrical, performances creating exactly the right kind of virile tension these two most masculine of composers demand; no soupy lingering yet many moments of real tenderness, especially when the Brahms moves from the strenuous protestations of the introduction to the first movement into the soaring, stratospheric melody of the first subject. It is in the Brahms in particular that I hear the evidence for the claim that Milstein was the greatest violinist of the 20C; I'm not inclined to argue with that assertion.
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